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#551 zoramargolis

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 04:27 PM

You can grind meat in a food processor. cut into chunks and put in the freezer for about 15 minutes, then pulse. I do it all the time. But you can do a quick stew in bbq sauce. Brown chunks of round quickly, and cook in the sauce--thinned with some water so it won't stick and burn--just until tender. Some sauteed onion and garlic, and aromatic herbs can only make it tastier.



#552 dcandohio

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 05:06 PM

You can grind meat in a food processor. cut into chunks and put in the freezer for about 15 minutes, then pulse. I do it all the time. But you can do a quick stew in bbq sauce. Brown chunks of round quickly, and cook in the sauce--thinned with some water so it won't stick and burn--just until tender. Some sauteed onion and garlic, and aromatic herbs can only make it tastier.


Thanks. That's what i'll do!

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#553 The Hersch

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 07:36 PM

Thanks. That's what i'll do!

 

If you had taken my Swiss steak suggestion, you could have had this:

SwissSteak_zps7f1b4740.jpg


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#554 dcandohio

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 09:16 PM

If you had taken my Swiss steak suggestion, you could have had this:
SwissSteak_zps7f1b4740.jpg


That looks delicious but my friend would have thought...yuk...which is why I went the safe "BBQ" route.

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#555 dcandohio

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 07:53 AM

Question: I have some good local bacon and am going to make candied bacon as an appetizer for two parties. The thought occurred to me that if I made a batch, cooled it well, and vacuum sealed it (I have that contraption), I could bring it as a gift when I travel for the holidays. I would make it the day before travel, and we would probably eat it within 2-3 days. I realize the bacon may soften, but would this be safe? Bacon is cured, it would be fully cooked...I'm thinking it would be OK. You?

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#556 Pat

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 09:52 AM

Precooked bacon is available for sale, unrefrigerated, in grocery stores, but it appears they do something extra special to preserve it.  This is what the USDA Bacon and Food Safety FAQ says about it:  

 
How is cooked bacon made shelf stable?
To make bacon safe to store at room temperature (shelf stable), it is precooked in the plant to have a water activity at or below 0.85 to control Staphylococcus aureus. The cooked yield is 40% of the raw weight.

 

 

I don't know how candying figures into that water activity situation.



#557 dcandohio

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 08:19 AM

OK, I experimented! I did three tests.
1. Candied bacon stored in a ziplock bag overnight, zapped in microwave for 12 seconds on a brown paper bag and left to crisp as it cooled. This piece was fine.
2. same storage, stored two days, and microwaved. Fine.
3. Candied bacon, vacuum sealed, stored for 4 days, then microwaved. It was OK. Flavor was fine, bacon stayed a bit softer than previous experiments. I ate it and did not feel sick!

I am not sure the vacuum sealing is worth the time unless I was bringing this treat somewhere where only a microwave was available. Given how easy candied bacon is to make, how tantalizing the house smells while it is cooking, and the wide availability of ingredients, I think I would rather just make it on site.

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#558 porcupine

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 08:22 AM

Bought a celeriac at the market yesterday - I've never cooked one.  Planning to make a soup out of it, with chicken stock and maybe an apple.  Any recipes you'd recommend, or tips?  Sure is an ugly thing.


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#559 lperry

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 09:12 AM

If I may suggest a different route, celery root and apple, shredded, salted to get some water out, tossed with rĂ©moulade, capers, and Italian parsley, well, it's a beautiful thing.  :)


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#560 porcupine

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 12:27 PM

Sounds lovely, but it's 36 degrees out with snow in the forecast.  Later today I'm firing up the woodstove, and soup is on the menu.  :-)  Possibly hot cocoa and chocolate chip cookies for dessert.  I'll try the salad when it's warmer outside.


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#561 hillvalley

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 12:40 PM

I love celeriac.  Besides the soup I treat it like a potato and make a mash or make oven fries.  Sounds like the start to a perfect afternoon.  Word of warning with the apple though-I find it can over power the celeriac. 


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#562 Pat

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 01:05 PM

I like mixing celeriac with potatoes for a puree.  I have a Molly O'Neill recipe from the Times in the 90s that I generally use, but I think most recipes for that kind of mash or puree are pretty similar.  And you could add stock to it and make a soup :) .


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#563 lperry

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:10 PM

OK, going the hot route I'll add that you can slice thinly and layer with potatoes into a lovely gratin. 


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#564 zoramargolis

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 07:18 PM

I'm probably a little late to this party, but I can't help chiming in. Soup of the evening. Celery root, potato, leek, onion, chicken broth, aromatic herbs, when everything is cooked, puree and add some cream. Perfection on a cold night.



#565 porcupine

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 07:10 AM

What I made was not dissimilar to yours, Zora.  Celeriac and a tiny amount of onion, cooked with bay leaf and thyme in chicken stock and apple cider, then pureed and finished with a little heavy cream and minced parsley.  I added a garnish of thinly sliced tiny new sorrel leaves and a tiny bit of serrano ham, each of which was almost overpowering; weird, because the soup was so pungent.  Still, really tasty.

 

hillvalley, re: treating like potato: could you make latkes out of it?


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#566 zoramargolis

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 11:12 AM

I'm not hillvalley, but I'm highly opinionated so I'll respond as well. The texture of celeriac is different than potato--it's more watery, less starchy. I think to make latkes with celeriac, the best strategy would be to mix it with potato. That, as I'm imagining it in my mind's palate, would be fabulous.


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#567 Pat

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 01:19 PM

After having used up the last bit of superfine sugar I had a while back, I need some for a tart I am making tomorrow and can't find any more.  I tried 3 different grocery chains.  After that fail, it occurred to me that I should have checked the aisle with cocktail items in addition to the baking aisle, since it's probably used most often in the US in drinks rather than baking.  Grrr.  Not going back out to look again.  

 

The sugar gets creamed with butter as part of a filling for a frangipane tart (British recipe), so the rate at which it dissolves shouldn't matter much.  I don't see any reason I can't use regular granulated sugar, but do I need to adjust the amount to account for a different granularity?  I'd think not since the measure is weight, not volume, but I thought I'd ask for confirmation of that.  

 

 

The relevant ingredients (plus a Tbsp. cognac):  

3 large free-range eggs

150g ground almonds
125g butter
125g caster sugar
50g plain flour
 
Thanks!


#568 porcupine

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 01:31 PM

A few thoughts:  first, if it's by weight, no adjustment needed.  The more finely something is ground, the less space it takes up, so for volumetric measure you absolutely have to compensate.  But, mass doesn't change, therefore weight doesn't change (so long as you're still on Earth).

 

Second, you can grind regular granulated sugar in a food processor to get superfine sugar.

 

Third, isn't caster sugar the same thing as confectioners' sugar?  In which case you might have a problem.  Is this for the crust?

 

edited to add: nevermind, with that much egg it has to be for the filling, right?

 

edited again:  I was wrong.  caster = superfine.  Go ahead and substitute granulated sugar; give it a whir in the food processor first if you can, but don't sweat it.


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#569 Pat

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 01:44 PM

Third, isn't caster sugar the same thing as confectioners' sugar?  In which case you might have a problem.  Is this for the crust?

 

To my understanding, confectioners' sugar is completely powdered, while caster is an intermediate point between that and granulated.  This is getting creamed with butter as part of a filling for a tart.  That's why I thought going with plain granulated wouldn't matter.  I even considered using part brown sugar to make it softer.

 

I have confectioners' sugar, but that doesn't seem right for this type of application.  I considered trying to whiz the granulated stuff in the food processor, but I have no idea what kind of consistency I might end up with doing that.



#570 lperry

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 01:48 PM

^ You can't use American confectioner's sugar as a substitute because it contains corn starch.  I have no idea why.  I would just use regular sugar and beat the mixture another minute or two to dissolve the larger granules.  I don't think there should be a problem at all, and it sounds like a lovely Valentine's dessert. :)



#571 zoramargolis

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 04:37 PM

Agree with those above who say caster sugar=superfine sugar. I don't buy it, I just run granulated sugar in my food processor for a couple of minutes.

#572 Pat

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 09:07 AM

The coarser sugar worked okay in the recipe.  My food processor bowl was being run through the dishwasher while I was assembling the filling, so I didn't try crushing the sugar into finer granules.  I could tell that smaller crystals would have been better, though, as I tasted smidgens of the filling leftover in the bowl and there were distinct hard sugar crystals in it.  It all seemed to dissolve down just fine in the baking process, though.

 

Thanks for all the feedback!


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#573 ktmoomau

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 04:47 PM

I didn't mean to buy maple bacon.  Goodness, it is really maple flavored bacon.  I grabbed it because it was thick cut and I thought it was just regular thick cut bacon.  How should I use the stuff?  It was gross on a sandwich with turkey and avocado, too sweet.  We don't eat a lot of dessert, so I would prefer to eat it in a savory application, but I think some of it might have to be used in a dessert.


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Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
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#574 Pat

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 05:01 PM

I didn't mean to buy maple bacon.  Goodness, it is really maple flavored bacon.  I grabbed it because it was thick cut and I thought it was just regular thick cut bacon.  How should I use the stuff?  It was gross on a sandwich with turkey and avocado, too sweet.  We don't eat a lot of dessert, so I would prefer to eat it in a savory application, but I think some of it might have to be used in a dessert.

 

You could try cooking it partway and putting the bits into pancake batter or waffles.  It would also be good cooked up and served alongside eggs or a frittata or scrapple.  Pork and maple go together really well.  It's the balance that's the issue.

 

I'm sure there are plenty of cupcake recipes and such that could use it, but I understand not wanting to use it in sweets.

 

Just think of situations where you might want to add maple syrup and go there.  Given that some salad dressings include maple syrup, maybe the bacon bits would be good just added to a salad.


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#575 The Hersch

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 06:34 PM

I didn't mean to buy maple bacon.  Goodness, it is really maple flavored bacon.  I grabbed it because it was thick cut and I thought it was just regular thick cut bacon.  How should I use the stuff?  It was gross on a sandwich with turkey and avocado, too sweet.  We don't eat a lot of dessert, so I would prefer to eat it in a savory application, but I think some of it might have to be used in a dessert.

 

Have you tried blanching it before frying? That might suck out some of the sweetness.


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#576 ktmoomau

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 10:08 PM

Have you tried blanching it before frying? That might suck out some of the sweetness.

So par boil then could you put it in the oven or would you have to fry it in a pan?


But I learned fast how to keep my head up 'cause I
Know I got this side of me that
Wants to grab the yoke from the pilot and just
Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
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#577 The Hersch

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 06:03 PM

So par boil then could you put it in the oven or would you have to fry it in a pan?

 

I don't see any reason you coudn't do it either way.


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Who taught my grief to thee?


#578 PollyG

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Posted 20 February 2015 - 09:43 PM

I didn't mean to buy maple bacon.  Goodness, it is really maple flavored bacon.  I grabbed it because it was thick cut and I thought it was just regular thick cut bacon.  How should I use the stuff?  It was gross on a sandwich with turkey and avocado, too sweet.  We don't eat a lot of dessert, so I would prefer to eat it in a savory application, but I think some of it might have to be used in a dessert.

Google "bacon brittle" and you have a dessert solution. I made that a few years ago and it was okay as a novelty dessert at a big party.  Do NOT, I repeat, do NOT put it in maple ice cream.  Once upon a time in the Amherst, MA area, the rest of the family enjoyed their plain maple soft-serve while I went for the bacon maple ice cream and enured the horror of the wet cardboard texture of bacon that has been sitting in ice cream. 



#579 legant

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 09:17 PM

Tofu: one recipe calls for blanching the tofu in boiling water for 30 seconds; the other: simmer while the rest of the ingredients are prepped. Both are alternatives to the "drain and press" method. I really liked the texture of the blanched and pan-fried tofu in a mushroom and mustard greens dish.

 

My question: why does blanching tofu draw out excess moisture more effectively than draining and pressing? It seems counterintuitive.



#580 ktmoomau

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 10:17 PM

Tofu: one recipe calls for blanching the tofu in boiling water for 30 seconds; the other: simmer while the rest of the ingredients are prepped. Both are alternatives to the "drain and press" method. I really liked the texture of the blanched and pan-fried tofu in a mushroom and mustard greens dish.

 

My question: why does blanching tofu draw out excess moisture more effectively than draining and pressing? It seems counterintuitive.

Absolute guess but maybe in cooking, the molecules expand and expel out water?


But I learned fast how to keep my head up 'cause I
Know I got this side of me that
Wants to grab the yoke from the pilot and just
Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
www.rrbmdk.com
www.katelintaylor.com


#581 porcupine

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 07:08 AM

legant, I tried researching your question (I'm curious, too!) but ran out of time.  I expect the answer is rather involved, chemically.  I think boiling changes the protein structure, maybe causing more extensive networking of proteins, leading to a firmer texture (analogous to way heat-cycling tires causes them to become harder through cross-polymerization).  This might feel similar on the tongue to simple mechanical expulsion of moisture, but is really quite different.  A more complex protein network would certainly not disintegrate as quickly as one that simple had moisture removed.

 

I would love it if someone could come up with a real answer.


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#582 ktmoomau

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Posted 01 March 2015 - 12:26 PM

You could try cooking it partway and putting the bits into pancake batter or waffles.  It would also be good cooked up and served alongside eggs or a frittata or scrapple.  Pork and maple go together really well.  It's the balance that's the issue.

 

I'm sure there are plenty of cupcake recipes and such that could use it, but I understand not wanting to use it in sweets.

 

Just think of situations where you might want to add maple syrup and go there.  Given that some salad dressings include maple syrup, maybe the bacon bits would be good just added to a salad.

Have you tried blanching it before frying? That might suck out some of the sweetness.

 

So I ended up using the rest in two ways.  One successful, one not, but it is gone and was not wasted.  I really dislike wasting food.  The unsuccessful was with spinach, leeks, along side baked apples on top of carolina gold rice.  This just didn't work, although I think it would have with just the apples on top of grits.  The second I pulsed the rest of the baked apples in my food processor and made pancakes with baked apples and maple bacon.  Those were good.  Although I never eat pancakes and am now quite full.  Won't make that mistake again. 


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But I learned fast how to keep my head up 'cause I
Know I got this side of me that
Wants to grab the yoke from the pilot and just
Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
www.rrbmdk.com
www.katelintaylor.com


#583 porcupine

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Posted 10 March 2015 - 09:54 AM

Does anyone have a good, tested recipe for a lamb ragu (with tomato, and not ground lamb)?  Nephew #3 is coming over to work on my motorcycle and I promised him dinner; he asked for "pasta with some sort of meat".


Elizabeth Miller
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#584 Pat

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Posted 10 March 2015 - 11:30 AM

I can't say how well tested it is by me, since I combined this with a few other recipes when I "made" it, but this seems to be what you're looking for.  It seems that it was tested by the person who created it, though, if you read the narrative.







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