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Found 451 results

  1. Welcome to the board Marty! Would you care to expand on your admonition? Cafe Deluxe doesn't get much attention on this board, but I find it to be a perfectly acceptable, even very good lunch spot, and they serve Sunday brunch starting at 10:30 am. I particularly like their roasted tomato soup and their roasted lamb and goat cheese on sourdough sandwich. BlakeG can probably expand more on what's good there too. I really enjoy 2Amys, but it can sometimes be crazy busy on Sundays.
  2. I went to a get-together with a large group at Homestead last night (my first time eating in Petworth). We were on the top floor of 3, where there was a bar and some tables, and they handled us well (large group of various people showing up anywhere between 6 and 9 p.m.). I like the space and the host was friendly and welcoming. I only had a small taste of the menu, but it was excellent. The things I ordered aren't on the online menu at http://homesteaddc.com/starters/ because their menu changes daily, although a number of items on the online menu were on the menu last night (quail, raclette, catfish, buttermilk hot chicken, half roasted chicken, Homestead burger). A salad of berries (blueberries and strawberries), goat cheese, hazelnuts and greens was great - very fresh, interesting greens that weren't the typical "mixed greens," though I can't tell you what they were. Good goat cheese and fresh, tasty berries. Large serving, too. Grilled squid was tiny tiny whole squid (baby squid, but much smaller than baby squid I've had before, about the size of a thumbnail), with drizzles of a delicious yellow sauce that tasted of Spain (I don't recall what was in it, maybe saffron?), and bits of diced fruit (pineapple? don't recall), on top of salad greens. Not what I expected, but very good. There was a saffron soup on the menu and I was very curious but didn't end up getting it. My husband got the half roasted chicken with vegetables and he was happy with it; someone else got the burger, and I snagged a few fries, which were good. Someone else was very happy with her tuna tartare over avocado, which looked appealing. There were many interesting cocktails on the menu (drinks menu isn't online). No mocktails, but I got a nonalcoholic version of a drink that had blackberries (or maybe blueberries, can't recall), cardamom syrup, and lemon. Very nice. Followed it with a ginger beer. There's outdoor seating on the second level (maybe 8 tables) and lots of space throughout the building. I'd definitely go back.
  3. Opening day drink menu Opening day menu Their imminent opening on H Street intrigues me, and to tell you the truth I'm not sure what to expect. The charcuterie and cheese has pedigree, the team looks pretty solid, and the menu looks fun as well. The "featured cocktails" exude confidence on paper; I've had the Lion's Tail at the Passenger and at home many times, and it's not an easy recipe to execute. Ditto, to a lesser degree, for the Seelbach. And the Five and Dime (ROOT, maple syrup, egg white, and Black IPA) is only locally eclipsed in opening menu audaciousness by SOVA/Derek Browns' placement of the coffee cocktail (cognac, port, a whole egg, and simple syrup, as well as a particularly strong shaker such as Jamie MacBain).
  4. Chef Spike Gjerde has opened his long awaited farm-to-table restaurant in Clipper Mill. The wife and I went there last night and were shocked at the full dining room, given the restaurant's out-of-the-way location. No matter though, we had made reservations and were seated promptly in the loft overlooking the dining room. The renovation to the building is stunning. The exposed brick walls and recycled old-growth lumber that were used are dramatically illuminated, looking both elegant and cozy at the same time. A wood burning oven is the center piece of the open kitchen, and most of the food on the menu seems to be cooked in it. We ordered: Oysters (raw and roasted) Chicken liver parfait Hamburger Autumn vegetables Everything was very good: the food, the service, and the space. We'll be back soon. Woodberry Kitchen
  5. Tim Carman just posted a fairly positive write-up of this latest franchise from the Tennessee-based chain. Having dined at a couple of the Memphis-area locations over the years, my expectations are very high and I will be investigating shortly. It's pretty spicy (but nothing like Nashville Hot) fried chicken and typical southern sides (menu here) in a relaxed atmosphere - at the downtown Memphis location, it was common to see folks waiting on a table with a 40oz bottle of malt liquor from the shop around the corner. Opening this thread in the hopes that someone has beaten me to the spot and can tell me if I should make the trip or just wait until I'm back in Memphis to visit family.
  6. Has anyone had an opportunity to visit Fireworks Wood Fired Pizza in Leesburg, Virginia? http://www.fireworkspizza.com/HOME2.htm My family and I have eaten at the restaurant once, and ordered take out twice. On our first visit, the first pie we ordered was the: quattro carni. The second (take out) was the: smokey blue, and the third (take out) was the: fire cracker. Our favorite pie thus far has been the: smokey blue, but felt that the service each time has been poor. During our first visit, the wait staff neglected to remember one-half of the order for my family. As a result causing the food delivery to be staggered. Each time we have called to place take out orders, the phone manners from the wait staff/bartender taking the order has been less than stellar.
  7. Greetings Rockwellers, Just got off the phone with Patrick Bazin, the former executive chef at Occidental in D.C., who is poised to welcome guests to his new namesake restaurant tomorrow evening. Bazin has about two dozen dishes on his debut menu, including items like a Southwestern chicken soup with black beans and grilled radicchio, ricotta ravioli in a Meyer lemon sauce and a "double thick" Iowa pork chop served with vanilla sweet potatoes and braised Swiss chard. Most appetizers appear to be under $10 and the entrees top out at $26 for the crab cakes. The restaurant is located at 111 Church Street NW in Old Town Vienna and doors open at 5 p.m. for dinner. Just thought you'd like to know.....
  8. It looks like Agraria's second location will be Founding Farmers, at the IMF building. See links here and here.
  9. Appleby's Hell Was out in Chantilly yesterday for the gun show, and my buddy and I were really hungry so we decided to go to Appleby's only because we hoped it would work in a pinch. So go in and get sat, then waiter who might be about 20 comes to table to take order. We ordered the boneless chicken wings, then both got burgers, one coke and one diet coke. When I asked that my burger be cooked medium and with the barbeque sauce on the side, he tells me that he thinks they have to cook it medium-well, but he will check with the manager. As for the buffalo tenders he goes into lenghty explanation of mild vs spicy. I opt for spicy. About five minutes later, he brings the sodas to the table, asking who gets diet-regular, we tell him. About ten minutes later the burgers come to the table. I looked at him and inquired as to the whereabouts of the buffalo tenders. DEER IN THE HEADLIGHT LOOK. Oh, do you guys still want those he asked, n ot quite sure himself. Yes, I say as I ask him for soda refills for both of us. Start in on burger and notice that sauce is on the side, yet also on the burger! My buddy ordered the same burger and got no sauce at all. He surived. Walking dead returns with the sodas only to auction them off. The kid only had 2 tables to deal with. The funny thing was this was kind of enjoyable to experience, with his 2.3 minute responses. Buffalo tenders come out near completion of the burgers and we start eating them. No more than 4 minutes had passed when Keeanu comes back and asked if were done. A simple no is my response, but I'm thinking that this guy is Agraria/Extra Virgin waiter material. Check is dropped about 10 minutes after that and the bill is $25.34 and "I'll take that when your ready" is gladly optioned to us. We throw down $40.00-2 twenty's and take a bet as to whether or not he is going to ask us if we want change. Personally I feel a 60% tip was a bit much, but who am I to question. Sure enough, he picks up the check and asks the million dollar question--" do you guys need change", trying not to either laugh/grab him by the neck and shake him, I just said Yes. It's always a roll of the dice in these places, and the meal was what we expected-decent for what we ordered. He was no Justin Guthrie, but hey, who is.
  10. I got the last seat at the bar at a crowded Riggsby, and immediately got an odd impression about the bartender. This was going to be an unusual evening - I felt it. He handed me the cocktail list, full of ordinary wines a touch too expensive for my blood, but I flipped it over, and there were some graphics showing some of the more upscale drinks; the problem, is that both the graphics and the text were so faded that they were barely readable. Strike one. But I wanted a Gin & Tonic, and that was the one list in the top-right corner, touting that it was made with Hendricks Gin and Fever Tree Tonic Water - I don't love Hendricks in my G&Ts, but I can live with it, so I ordered it. You're out of Fever Tree Tonic Water? Oh. Normally, I'd say Strike two, but you'd just been First Bitten the day before, so, no pitch. And plus, you told me you had their Ginger Beer, so I looked below it at their Moscow Mule. A picture of a beautiful copper tankard was accompanied by the description that the drink was made with a "high-quality" vodka with Fever Tree Ginger Beer, a little lime juice, and a wedge of lime - sounded good to me, so I went with it. Oh, you don't serve these in copper tankards like you have them pictured? Well, I'd say Strike two, but that's not really you're fault, so no pitch. Sure, why not. So I started my meal with a Moscow Mule ($8), and the vodka he used was pulled up from under the bar and poured like he was trying desperately to empty the bottle. The lime juice was measured, however - I thought it was supposed to be the other way around? It was a *strong* drink, but it didn't taste bad, and after all, it used Fever Tree Ginger Beer. But what was that vodka? It was in a blue bottle, and I became curious. I nursed my drink while perusing the menu, and by the time I got to the bottom, I was ready for another, and when he asked me, I asked him what type of Vodka he used in that first drink. He pulled the bottle up from underneath the bar, and held it before my eyes: Skyy. Strike two, my friend: this is a $14 bottle of rot-gut, and it's no wonder you were trying to get rid of it - what happened to the "high-quality vodka" in the description? Well, at least it was an $8 drink. He told me I could have it made with any of their shelf vodka's ... Tito's, Ketel One, Grey Goose ... okay, better. This one, I got with Ketel One. And he measured the vodka, and short-poured me - filling the measuring cup only about 3/4 of the way before taking a scoop of ice so large that there was ice 3-4 inches above the top of my glass which needed to be whisked off. The rest of the drink was made normally, but it's amazing how small of a cocktail you can get when your glass is absolutely full with small ice cubes. It tasted like a mocktail with no alcohol in it. And damned if I didn't get charged $12 for the drink. Strike three. He knew what he was doing; he was just anti-customer, or so I thought. I ordered my meal, a Schnitzel "a la Holstein" ($29), and asked what it came with - "warm, German potato salad," he said. Okay, it sounded potentially acidic, but I took my chances, and with it, I ordered as a second side order, something from the bar menu: Chorizo-Stuffed Mushrooms ($7) which took him aback - I guess people aren't ordering these things as sides with their meals, but it sounded like it would go just fine with my meal, so I verified with him, yes, I'd like it with my meal; not as an appetizer. No problem. A short while later, everything arrived from behind me, and I could see why my bartender had raised an eyebrow - my entree and its "German potato salad" had been cooked to order; my chorizo stuffed mushrooms were made earlier in the day and reheated - they were dried out, and really did look like pass-around canapes, or bar snacks. But the flavors were all there, and they did, in fact, go with everything else. The schnitzel itself was delicious, but pounded more thinly than I've ever seen a schnitzel presented before - I was hoping for something nearly twice this thick for $29. So they not only get you with a high price, but also with deceptively small amounts of meat. Still, the batter was delicious, the schnitzel was cooked very well, and it came with some anchovies (for some much-needed salt), capers, and a runny egg. Every so often I'd spear a new potato from its iron skillet sitting next to my plate (this was my "German Potato Salad" - it was halved new potatoes, with a little onion on the bottom and cooked with some jus, perhaps from the schnitzel, and they were *delicious* - a nice surprise in a meal where I felt like I was getting nickled-and-dimed. Likewise, I did the same with my chorizo-stuffed mushrooms, which were about the same size as the potatoes - yes, they were older and dried out, but when put on my plate and cut in half, they went very well with my other two items. Right when the food came, my bartender asked me if I'd wanted another drink, and I told him I was thinking about a glass of wine. He thought for a moment, and said, "I've got something for you to try," before pouring me a generous glass of Vermentino ($11), which is exactly the wine I would have chosen for myself. I complimented him on his call, and he began to warm up. So I enjoyed my rather expensive meal (the final bill was $73.70 before tip), then asked for the check. I reached for my wallet and mouthed the words, 'Oh, my God.' He saw me do this, obviously read my lips, and knew something was wrong. I had forgotten my wallet in the car. Embarrassed, I explained this all to him, and handed him my keys and iPhone, saying I'd be back in five minutes. (I did have the wits about me to take my car key off the ring.) No problem, he said, and I showed up a bit later, left a $15 tip, and all was well. "I could tell something bad had happened when I saw your face," he laughed. So, all's well that ends well, and I enjoyed my meal even though I was out $88.70. And the bartender wasn't such a bad chap after all.
  11. Just got this email off the dc-beer email list: Props to Thomas Cizauskas for the info. Will definitely be interesting to see how this place develops, maybe a good spot for a meal before a show at Rock and Roll Hotel? That area is still pretty rough, though, and it's a pain in the ass to get there without a car. Still, very interesting...
  12. No, but it's now open, and here are the website and current menus. Note that there's a pop-up window advertising heritage turkey dinners (complete dinners) to go for Thanksgiving this year - they're asking you to order early (note to NRG: That window is showing up every time you click on something on the website - it would be nice if you saw it only once). Dinner: Charcuterie: Beer: Drinks and Wine:
  13. Old Arlington Grill - which is on the opposite side of the entrance to Arlington Cinema 'N' Drafthouse as the underrated Mazagan, is closed, and there's a banner up for a new restaurant which is coming. For the life of me, I can't remember the name of the restaurant (it caught me off-guard), but it's something ethnic - maybe Thai. If anyone is driving by on Columbia Pike, take a peak at the sign and let us know?
  14. Got this notification from Thrillist on the planned opening of The Bayou in DC. "Taking over the old Rookery space, Bayou's a two story New Orleans-themed jazz-taurant rocking vintage black and white pics of the Big Easy and a large mural of a jazz band on Frenchman St. under chandeliers. They're hawking everything from po' boys to "St. Charles Fried Oysters", and live-tuning light jazz Thurs-Saturday evenings, followed by later-night rump-shakers like "Old Man Brown" and "Buster Brown and the Get Down", which actually isn't the name of the band, but rather instructions to Buster Brown while walking some of NO's rougher neighborhoods. The Deep South crew is hosting a party for the Saints playoff game Saturday, so check the menu here beforehand at bayoudc.com" TSchaad
  15. Of the new crop of restaurants on Columbia Heights' 11th Street strip, I've been to Kangaroo Boxing Club the most--four times. This isn't by design, but it's easy, comfortable, welcoming, and has enough high points that it's easy to look past the weak ones. The pastrami, for instance. I'm no expert, but this is by far the best I've ever had. I mean, outstanding, off-the-charts, off-the-hook terrific. The rye bread holds up to it and I don't know how it's possible, but the mustard makes it all even better. Seriously: get the pastrami. I'm not as wild about the other meats. The Smokey Joe is okay--too much, too strong, too salty sauce mixed with over-shredded beef that's only remarkable if you get a couple of the awesome smoky end pieces in the mix. The chocolate BBQ on the pulled chicken is also pretty spicy, and the chicken is fine. I don't remember much about the pulled pork (not a good sign, but it was a couple of months ago) except that I couldn't really find a sauce I liked--I think they all were too spicy for me*--and the bottom bun was soaked through with grease. I clearly need to give it another go. Those sandwich buns are good though. The beans vex me. They vex me so. The first time they were amazing; the second time they tasted like someone had spilled a bottle of vinegar on them; the third time, amazing again; the fourth time vinegar again, plus something else not so good. What the hell? Seems to me that we've got two chefs making two different recipes, and it makes me sad because I've clearly got a 50-50 chance of getting a ramekin of yuck, and those odds just aren't fair. But when they're done right, the beans are the best side on the menu, along with the johnny cakes. The mac and cheese is pretty darn good, and the greens and salad are run-of-the-mill. The garlic fries are nice, but it's the dipping sauce that makes them dangerously addictive. I think they only have three beer taps, but they're stocked with good stuff (the Redtober and Mojo are my recent faves) so I haven't explored the bottles. I stay away from the cocktails, which, even when on special, just aren't that well made. The service is across the board terrific, but the joint is seriously tiny. The bar has been full pretty much every time I've been in, and every seat in the place tends to be taken by 6:30. *Is BBQ usually this spicy? I'm sort of on the mild-to-medium end of the spectrum, but I was surprised that every sauce was so firey. Sigh. Guess I'll have to stick with the pastrami (poor me!).
  16. The Branded Saloon is a corner neighborhood bar with a somewhat kitschy Western theme - wagon wheel chandelier, stuffed animals heads mounted on the wall, you get the picture. The small front room has a friendly looking bar and stools along with a handful of booths. The back room hosts live music and other events nightly and the basement has a pool table. A small patio area is out front for a sunny day. The Brussel sprout hash with bacon, potatoes, poached eggs, garlic cilantro hollandaise made for a good brunch dish, the accompanying "white toast" was supermarket quality and had spent maybe 10 seconds near a toaster. Very good Bloody Mary. The beer list skewed local. I'm not sure anyone would go out of their way to go to the Branded Saloon, but it's the sort of neighborhood bar that should be supported.
  17. DGDB (website) is currently open for dinner, rolling out brunch and lunch in the next few weeks. Boulud said this restaurant was going to be the most American of his French restaurants. Also it is noted because it will be serving the "Crabbie" with a nod to SpongeBob. But all that makes it sound so much less of what the opening showed it is likely to be. The bar, with marble and mirrored walls with etched quotes about libations was playful. I liked the height of the space and it made it feel a little less loud while quite packed on opening night. Wine, beer, cocktails were served, we tasted two of the cocktails which I have to say even on a packed night they were shaking up quickly and consistently, so kudos on that. The upstairs private dining was much more normal corporate feel with carpeted floors and blue walls, it wasn't as colorful, but still had fun views with big windows on each side. The upstairs was very loud, but there were also a lot of people up there because of the raw bar. I hope the guys shucking oysters aren't there normal crew because one guy was kind of butchering all of his. On the main floor going back towards the dining room from the bar there were shelves with plates painted by other chefs, cookbooks and other items. The plates were really the coolest part. Some chefs (cough cough Cathral Armstrong) were phoning it in, and some are really cool. A few are so well done I wonder if they had someone do theirs for them. But they were fun to see and some of the chefs I didn't know I was looking up to see what restaurants they were from. It gave it a very casual feel, while not being super casual, reminiscent of a less Southern Empire State South. The back wall can open up completely to the inner courtyard there of City Center which was a really nice feature, it really made the space feel open and kept that section a little less noisy even when really full. I assume they are going to have some patio space, which would be nice given the large courtyard. As to the food, there were a lot of excellent bites at the opening that represented dishes off the main menu. I think the food will be casual, but thoughtful enough to pull off casual well. There was an anchovy dip that wasn't bagna cauda that was really unusual, but so good, I hope this shows up somewhere on the main menu. There were some nice surprise tastes in what might be a very seen it dish, such as their tuna with harissa, and amazing roasted eggplant with very melt in your mouth soft flavorful lamb and an escargot dish that was more than just butter and garlic, in a good way. I thought the sausages in the chorizo ish hot dogs were well made and really flavorful. You could tell from the menu this is a place that will be able to serve all day, which I think in this area of town is a good thing. A huge advantage they have for them is the the bread will be from Mark Furstenberg. A French restaurant with decidedly excellent bread can never be a bad thing. This shouldn't be a surprise, but especially in DC it sometimes is, if the desserts on the menu are as excellent as the opening this is going to be a really strong portion of the menu, which is something I think is exciting. The desserts are the items that really stayed in my head and would make me want to go back. Overall based on the opening, I am excited to see the menu and try some dishes. I think it will represent as another solid option in that area. So we will see. But the opening was a lot of fun. If nothing else the man can throw a great party and be the star of it very well.
  18. ARLnow.com is reporting a new "gastropub" (I hate that term) named The Green Pig Bistro is coming to this space.
  19. jandres (I *hate* it when I can't address our members by their first names, but I can't!), Am I reading the article correctly in that Thompson Hospitality owns Austin Grill, is closing it, and reopening Hen Quarter in the same location in July? [Well, I guess either way, Hen Quarter gets its own thread (oddly, had this been the last Austin Grill - and I assume that day will come - the existing thread would simply be renamed), so one day in the future, whichever restaurant replaces the final Austin Grill - assuming it, too, is owned by Thompson Hospitality - is going to have a *lot* of posts and views in its thread on day one. I use *such* a simple algorithm for using existing threads, or creating new ones, but regardless of its simplicity, its permutations are seemingly endless.]
  20. I'm really looking forward to trying this place. Has anyone been yet? Thrillest article: http://www.thrillist.com/eat/washington-dc/20003/beucherts-saloon?utm_content=feature&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Washington%20DC&utm_campaign=2.13.13%20DC:%20Beuchert%27s%20Saloon Restaurant website
  21. How about Equinox? Who has been there and what were your thoughts? I have searched this forum and haven't seen mention of it.
  22. Mar 14, 2017 - "Bel-Loc Diner To Close March 26 after 53 Years" by Rachael Pacella on baltimoresun.com Note: Bel-Loc Diner has taken its place on the "Oldest Restaurants in the Baltimore and Annapolis Area" list.
  23. I couldn't find a thread about Logan Tavern on DR.com, just Merkado it's ugly stepsister. I have had a few pretty good dinners at LT - not fine dining, for sure, but pleasant. Today a few friends and I tried it for brunch. We were pretty happy with the results. The scene is slightly more diverse at brunch. Still a heavy guppy presence, but also families, straight folks, etc. When we arrived around noon, the friendly hostess told us it would be a fifteen minute wait. Three barstools quickly opened up so we opted to to eat there. I wanted breakfast and had the french toast with caramelized pecan sauce and bacon. We also ordered a side of scrambled eggs when we saw a platter of them go by; they looked REAL GOOD! Hangover food. The french toast, two large thick pieces of it, was delicious, and also came with potatoes (not noted on the menu) which were good but with everything else, maybe overkill. The bacon was a little sad - just two skinny strips - but tasted good. My friends had the steak and cheese with grilled onions and mushrooms, and grilled cheese with tomato and slab bacon, both with fries (our kind bartender steered them away from the cole slaw). The grilled cheese came with horseradish mayo or something to that effect, but it was much better paired with the steak and cheese. By the time we finished, the joint was jumpin'. Everyone was stuffed and sated, and the bill for three of us (no drinks) was about $32.