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Found 14 results

  1. Having had an exceptional experience in Hong Kong with a Yakitori place there (which I still need to write up and post about), we looked for someplace in the DC metro area and came up empty. We tried a place on our recent trip to NYC called Yakitori Tora. It wasn't as good as the place in Hong Kong, but it was still very good! Yakitori is, I think, most often char-grilled skewers of meats, mainly chicken. The place in Hong Kong, aside from cheese (yes cheese), it was pure chicken. This place had more than that. We had chicken in many forms, thigh, heart, skin (a very, very inventive rendition and tremendous), and liver of course. Oh and duck meatball. And bacon wrapped mushrooms. Fun and good. It's a meal you can make as long or as short as you like and since each thing you order is pretty small, you can dig in for the long haul or just stop in for a snack before you go somewhere else. I'd go here again. Photos
  2. I'm intrigued by Chicken 65, which I've never tried before. Northern Virginia Table Tennis Center is less than two miles from here, so I'll be trying this dish soon. Does anyone know of other Southern Indian restaurants that have Chicken 65? I don't recall ever seeing it on a menu.
  3. Chicken 65

    Up in Columbia, I have seen Chicken 65 at both Mirchi Wok and Chutney before. I don't see it on their online menu right now though, so they might have been specials or they might just not be listed online?
  4. Just heard that Nando's is opening their first US store in Chinatown at the Asylum Skate Shop space at 819 7th St NW. Don't exactly know when it will open though, but in the near future. Will update as I find out. If you are not familiar with Nando's, it is a South African chain that specializes in Peri-Peri Chicken. Their sauces have been on sale at Whole Foods and elsewhere for a while. This will be their first US restaurant. I've had many an enjoyable meal there in South Africa and the UK. Pretty excited to have another cheap dining option in Chinatown.
  5. I have not been able to find any DC-area Yakitori restaurants. There are certainly some in NYC. Am I overlooking and just missing it if there is one around here?
  6. You know, I just don't love cold, steamed, Chinese chicken, no matter what the prep is. I like it, but I don't love it, and it's one of the few things I actively avoid - maybe because it's often served at refrigerator temperature rather than "slightly warm," and the fat (whatever's not strained) seems to stay slightly congealed and I'm not a big Chicken Fat guy.
  7. I generally agree with the sentiment, but for what it's worth the roast chicken with bread salad at Zuni Cafe is $54 and TOTALLY worth it. The menu here looks undoubtedly impressive, though my inclination would be to try Metier first as well.
  8. Next time you find yourself near Suitland and you're wanting some good seafood at very reasonable prices, go find Food for Life Cuisine on Suitland Road. I've made two visits and I'm amazed at the amount of food you get for the price. Oh, and it's good, too. Today I'm enjoying the whiting nuggets (about 8-9 large nuggets for $6.00) and hushbabies (10 large puppies for $3.50; not sure why they're called "babies"). Good hushpuppies can be hard to find around here, but I found some! Looks like they mainly have whiting, tilapia, and salmon. They also have some chicken items and burgers, southern style sides, desserts, and carrot fries (which I have yet to try). You get two sauces with your order, which I believe are made in-house. I'd post a link to their website, but for some odd reason I'm having trouble pasting here. You can copy and paste this: fflcuisineonline.com.
  9. You folks are too rich for me. But I enjoy my vicarious gratification while munching my pretzels. Is there a thread on Chik-fil-A?
  10. There have been the Peruvian chicken threads, but I decided to start one just for Crisp & Juicy. I went to the one in the Wheaton Mall and got the usual chicken and fried yucca. But also decided to get the fried plantains and potato salad. The plantains were okay - not caramelized the way I usually like them. The potato salad was really good though, with green beans and corn, it gave it a fresher, crisper edge instead of the heavier slog.
  11. Grover and I decided it would be a good idea to end 2011 with an over-indulgence in chicken, after all, what could be a better way to finish up the year? We headed out to Loehmann's Plaza in beautiful West Falls Church to explore Ultimate Chicken Bistro (from now on, UCB). The bright red banner announcing UCB and Grand Opening made it pretty easy to spot. UCB has only been open about a month but seems to have settled into a easy pattern of getting you seated, getting menus and taking drink orders. The menu features Chicken. Chicken Italian Style, Chicken Japanese Style, Chicken Chinese Style and (for us, the best) Chicken Korean Style. We ordered Korean style (naturally). A large serving of Popcorn Chicken and a small Fried Chicken. For sides, we had french fries (not known as a Korean side dish), pickled radish, and fried rice. Service is done in typical Korean style. Whatever cooks first gets served first. The fries were first. While they weren't hand cut and quintuple fried and dipped in ice water and all the other things that people do to tart up potatoes, they were decent. A nice firm outer, potatoey, flavorful interior. Next came the popcorn chicken. If you've been to Cheogajip, you are probably familiar with the popcorn chicken concept. Small, boneless pieces of breaded chicken, fried Korean style. The popcorn chicken comes with two dipping sauces, one mild and one spicy. Both of these are apparently aimed at Mee-Guks (non-Koreans). Both sauces were flavorful but the spicy wasn't spicy in the normal Korean sense. The chicken was very nice and moist and had a almost crunchy coating. The large was large, the plate was piled high. Next came the fried chicken. There were about six pieces and it was HOT (heat, not spicy) and it was extraordinary. A golden brown crunchy covering (it's not breaded, it's Korean chicken after all) over some of the nicest, moist, flavorful chicken I've had in a long time. If you expect to find those distinct pieces of chicken (legs, thighs, you know, the stuff they sell in Giant) you're going to be disappointed. The chicken is cut in the distinct Asian way. Lot's of meat and almost no bone on some pieces, other pieces with some bone. This requires a bit of caution while eating but nothing that can't be handled with a bit of care. The takeout service seems to be really popular. There must have been 10 takeout orders that were picked up while we were there. We left stuffed and with a bag of left-overs that consisted of one piece of chicken and the fried rice which we never even touched. Grover paid the bill (she's such a sweetheart ), so I have no idea what the final cost was but here's the menu. You can get an idea from that. We both enjoyed the food very much.
  12. "Audit Gives China Green Light To Process U.S. Chicken" by Bill Tomson and Tarini Parti on Politico.com
  13. Inspired by an NYT article that synaesthesia sent about Korean fried chicken, Escoffier and I went to Cheogajip tonight. It is mainly a small takeout place but there are 4 tables for eating in as well. We ordered the popcorn chicken ($8.99) with the spicy dipping sauce. When it was delivered to our table, it was a plate piled high with small, boneless pieces of chicken. Accompanying the chicken was pickled radish and a cabbage salad as sides. The chicken was crispy and not greasy at all. Forget the normal Southern style chicken that's soaked in buttermilk and then dredged in flour before being fried, this was a almost perfectly smooth crisp coating that accented the taste of the chicken without being soggy. The dipping sauce is very subtle. You dip the chicken in the sauce and can eat 3 or 4 pieces before the sauce sneaks up on you with a nice spicy warmth that isn't overpowering at all. For around $10, you leave full, satisfied and with a nice warm glow from the sauce. For $15 you can get a whole chicken with a spicy coating that has more heat than the dipping sauce (this is the best seller among Cheogajip's clientele). There are also wings available. All of the chicken is cooked to order, forget heat lamps or microwaves, you'll have to wait for your order. It's worth the wait. Judging by the number of people who were picking up orders, ordering by phone for pickup seems to be the way to go. Cheogajip has restaurants in Centerville, Annandale and Flushing if you happen to be in New York.
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