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Found 12 results

  1. Has anyone else on the board been to Cosmopolitan Bakery, Carryout and Catering in Alexandria? DCist Amanda Kazdoy is calling it an "ethnic cuisine epiphany" and describes the pljeskavica, or "Bosnian Burger" as oh my. I'm definitely putting this one on my list of "must try" places when next I cross that great divide. It's located at 5902A N. Kings Higway in Alexandria (703) 329-3303, but as DCist notes, the sign out front still says "Abi II Carryout," from the former occupant.
  2. Greetings Rockwellers, Just got off the phone with Patrick Bazin, the former executive chef at Occidental in D.C., who is poised to welcome guests to his new namesake restaurant tomorrow evening. Bazin has about two dozen dishes on his debut menu, including items like a Southwestern chicken soup with black beans and grilled radicchio, ricotta ravioli in a Meyer lemon sauce and a "double thick" Iowa pork chop served with vanilla sweet potatoes and braised Swiss chard. Most appetizers appear to be under $10 and the entrees top out at $26 for the crab cakes. The restaurant is located at 111 Church Street NW in Old Town Vienna and doors open at 5 p.m. for dinner. Just thought you'd like to know.....
  3. The best-kept secret in town, but not for long - unconfirmed opening date is August 25th, with a soft opening before that. I'll let others fill in the details, but this sounds like a fairly ambitious effort. At the Jefferson Hotel on 16th and M Streets: Plume. Here is a press release from March. Cheers, Rocks.
  4. I got the last seat at the bar at a crowded Riggsby, and immediately got an odd impression about the bartender. This was going to be an unusual evening - I felt it. He handed me the cocktail list, full of ordinary wines a touch too expensive for my blood, but I flipped it over, and there were some graphics showing some of the more upscale drinks; the problem, is that both the graphics and the text were so faded that they were barely readable. Strike one. But I wanted a Gin & Tonic, and that was the one list in the top-right corner, touting that it was made with Hendricks Gin and Fever Tree Tonic Water - I don't love Hendricks in my G&Ts, but I can live with it, so I ordered it. You're out of Fever Tree Tonic Water? Oh. Normally, I'd say Strike two, but you'd just been First Bitten the day before, so, no pitch. And plus, you told me you had their Ginger Beer, so I looked below it at their Moscow Mule. A picture of a beautiful copper tankard was accompanied by the description that the drink was made with a "high-quality" vodka with Fever Tree Ginger Beer, a little lime juice, and a wedge of lime - sounded good to me, so I went with it. Oh, you don't serve these in copper tankards like you have them pictured? Well, I'd say Strike two, but that's not really you're fault, so no pitch. Sure, why not. So I started my meal with a Moscow Mule ($8), and the vodka he used was pulled up from under the bar and poured like he was trying desperately to empty the bottle. The lime juice was measured, however - I thought it was supposed to be the other way around? It was a *strong* drink, but it didn't taste bad, and after all, it used Fever Tree Ginger Beer. But what was that vodka? It was in a blue bottle, and I became curious. I nursed my drink while perusing the menu, and by the time I got to the bottom, I was ready for another, and when he asked me, I asked him what type of Vodka he used in that first drink. He pulled the bottle up from underneath the bar, and held it before my eyes: Skyy. Strike two, my friend: this is a $14 bottle of rot-gut, and it's no wonder you were trying to get rid of it - what happened to the "high-quality vodka" in the description? Well, at least it was an $8 drink. He told me I could have it made with any of their shelf vodka's ... Tito's, Ketel One, Grey Goose ... okay, better. This one, I got with Ketel One. And he measured the vodka, and short-poured me - filling the measuring cup only about 3/4 of the way before taking a scoop of ice so large that there was ice 3-4 inches above the top of my glass which needed to be whisked off. The rest of the drink was made normally, but it's amazing how small of a cocktail you can get when your glass is absolutely full with small ice cubes. It tasted like a mocktail with no alcohol in it. And damned if I didn't get charged $12 for the drink. Strike three. He knew what he was doing; he was just anti-customer, or so I thought. I ordered my meal, a Schnitzel "a la Holstein" ($29), and asked what it came with - "warm, German potato salad," he said. Okay, it sounded potentially acidic, but I took my chances, and with it, I ordered as a second side order, something from the bar menu: Chorizo-Stuffed Mushrooms ($7) which took him aback - I guess people aren't ordering these things as sides with their meals, but it sounded like it would go just fine with my meal, so I verified with him, yes, I'd like it with my meal; not as an appetizer. No problem. A short while later, everything arrived from behind me, and I could see why my bartender had raised an eyebrow - my entree and its "German potato salad" had been cooked to order; my chorizo stuffed mushrooms were made earlier in the day and reheated - they were dried out, and really did look like pass-around canapes, or bar snacks. But the flavors were all there, and they did, in fact, go with everything else. The schnitzel itself was delicious, but pounded more thinly than I've ever seen a schnitzel presented before - I was hoping for something nearly twice this thick for $29. So they not only get you with a high price, but also with deceptively small amounts of meat. Still, the batter was delicious, the schnitzel was cooked very well, and it came with some anchovies (for some much-needed salt), capers, and a runny egg. Every so often I'd spear a new potato from its iron skillet sitting next to my plate (this was my "German Potato Salad" - it was halved new potatoes, with a little onion on the bottom and cooked with some jus, perhaps from the schnitzel, and they were *delicious* - a nice surprise in a meal where I felt like I was getting nickled-and-dimed. Likewise, I did the same with my chorizo-stuffed mushrooms, which were about the same size as the potatoes - yes, they were older and dried out, but when put on my plate and cut in half, they went very well with my other two items. Right when the food came, my bartender asked me if I'd wanted another drink, and I told him I was thinking about a glass of wine. He thought for a moment, and said, "I've got something for you to try," before pouring me a generous glass of Vermentino ($11), which is exactly the wine I would have chosen for myself. I complimented him on his call, and he began to warm up. So I enjoyed my rather expensive meal (the final bill was $73.70 before tip), then asked for the check. I reached for my wallet and mouthed the words, 'Oh, my God.' He saw me do this, obviously read my lips, and knew something was wrong. I had forgotten my wallet in the car. Embarrassed, I explained this all to him, and handed him my keys and iPhone, saying I'd be back in five minutes. (I did have the wits about me to take my car key off the ring.) No problem, he said, and I showed up a bit later, left a $15 tip, and all was well. "I could tell something bad had happened when I saw your face," he laughed. So, all's well that ends well, and I enjoyed my meal even though I was out $88.70. And the bartender wasn't such a bad chap after all.
  5. Northern Virginia magazine reported that Cassatt's owner Art Hauptman opened the market portion of Bistro 360 on Oct. 17 in Cafe Assorti's former location. Although Northern Virginia magazine states that "Hauptman hopes to have the restaurant and wine bar of Bistro 360 open late next week," the Bistro 360 website says that the Bistro360 Eatery will open on Nov. 3 and the wine bar and market are now open.
  6. Manor House at Poplar Springs is the website for a very real enigma. I've never heard of it yet the website looks absolutely fascinating. It's also nominated on WUSA 9 for the title of the Washington area's most romantic restaurant along with Citronelle and Obelisk among others. Has anyone been?
  7. Panache, on Desales Street (across the street from the North side of the Mayflower Hotel) is worth exploring.
  8. El Manatial on N. Shore drive is pretty good and offers a tapas menu. We like the chorizo and oysters. They do a pretty good Spanish omlet, too. http://www.elmanantialrestaurant.com
  9. Barbara and I popped in tonight about 7 PM. The place was empty except for one manager/server up front and an unknown number in the kitchen. No customers. That's not encouraging, but we were welcomed warmly and advised to sit anywhere. We took a table in the corner and after examining the menu, ordered the mixed grill for two, $30. This was a generous portion of steak, chicken, veal, and cevapi sausages and grilled vegetables (zucchini, carrot, and bell pepper) with bread to mop it up. The meat had been pounded thin, was quick-grilled so it got some sear on the outside and wasn't dry despite being thin. The rest of the menu is similar to other Eastern European restaurants in this area (like Cosmopolitan) with a mix of familiar German schnitzels, less familiar dishes from the Balkans, and an occasional totally American dish. The decor is very sleek and lounge-y in front, with a more traditional dining room in back. Hopefully they'll be able to get their wine and beer license soon, because I can definitely see hanging out here with a glass of wine and a snack at the bar. I'm glad to see a place that isn't a chain opening here in South Alexandria. (South of Old Town = SoOld?) Our host gave us several menus to give to friends. I'll scan one and post it up here.
  10. Blackfish is nearby in Conshohocken, about a 10 minute drive from KOP. I haven't been, but heard good things about this little BYOB. It was all the rage in Philadelphia a few years ago, and it sounds like they're still pumping out good food.
  11. It's VERY little known, and it's about 30 minutes OUTSIDE Philadelphia, but I cannot recommend the Mainland Inn enough. I have never had a bad experience or meal there, and it ranks number one on my list of personal favorite restaurants in the world.