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#1 DonRocks

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 11:34 PM

The Chef's Table at Teatro Goldoni may be the greatest dining experience in Washington, DC right now. A single table, seating up to six people, set off to the side of the kitchen. Like the way it used to be at Roberto Donna's Laboratorio, Enzo Fargione turns the chef's table into his private playground, first asking if there are any allergies, then trying to gage about how many courses the diners wish to experience, then going off on his freakishly talented tangent, producing course-after-course that not just dazzle the diner, but instill a sense of absolute humility, such as he did when he served me the lobster risotto.

He came over and asked me how it was.

My head was down on the table when he arrived, one of my cheeks touching the wood, and my eyes rolled back in capitulation. I managed enough strength to pick myself up, and I just looked at him and shook my head.

"This is the single best dish I've had in 2008," I said.

He looked at me with dismissal, and replied, "You said that about the duck the last time you were in here."

Well.

I admit I'm given to rapture when I get caught up in the moment, and sometimes blat out statements that might be hyperbolic. Guilty as charged, and my response was simple and wiggly: "This is later in the year."

The lobster risotto! Oh my God, the lobster risotto! Do you know what this is?

I've said dishes are Michelin two-star quality before - I'm certain I've said that about some individual items at Palena, for example. But have I ever said that a dish was not just a Michelin three-star dish, but a high-level Michelin three-star dish? Meaning that this is the level of execution you should expect at the priciest, costliest, most expensive, reputable restaurants in the entire world, but only on a good day?

This lobster risotto was at that level. Carnaroli, cooked down with lobster and cherry-tomato confit, and finished with young Maine lobster tail. Fargione even managed to purposefully integrate the dish with the red Burgundy I was drinking by placing a couple fried artichoke chips on top. It sounds so simple, but there's nothing like this, not anywhere. I would have this dish on my deathbed. I mean that: If I were going to the electric chair tomorrow, I could easily see myself requesting this dish as my last meal, because this is as good as food can ever possibly be. My only fear is that if you get it, it will somehow fall short, and that would be so tragically sad. Please tell Enzo, "I want the exact same dish that Rockwell had, and if you can't make it tonight, let's go with something else."

I could go on about the meal as a whole, but why bother? The chef's table at Teatro Goldoni is $125, and you'll keep getting courses until you wave the white flag. With wine pairings, it's an unbelievably cheap $150. If you're looking for an alternative to Eve's Tasting Room, Citronelle Chef's Table, Cityzen, Inn at Little Washington, MiniBar, Komi, or the Chef's Table at 2941, I would urge you to try this. Give this incredible genius free reign to cook for you until you can take no more, and revel in what might be the single best meal served in Washington, DC on the night you go. And save room for the cannoli! One hint about the cannoli: Enzo is a big fan of cigars, and that's all I'm going to say.

"This is as good as Maestro was, you know," I said to my friend.

"Oh, I like this better than I ever liked Maestro," was the response. "The last meal I had where I enjoyed every component was at Pierre Gagnaire." The difference being, of course, that both of those restaurants were bringing it for the entire dining room, whereas this is for a select, fortunate few. And there's also no doubting the difference in atmosphere, service, kitchen staff, etc.

I cannot tell you how unearthly the chef's table is at Teatro Goldoni. You can bring a bottle of wine for $25 (please do it discretely). I can't rate the entire restaurant bold in the dining guide, because I'm well aware that people dining in the dining room aren't dining at this level.

I don't know what else to say. I'm in awe of Enzo Fargione. Absolute awe.

Cheers,
Rocks.

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#2 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 09:59 AM

I e-mailed the restaurant and they said you don't need a party of 6 to book the chef's table. Hmm.....I'm sure my wife will go, it's just a matter of whether I want to drop $300+ on dinner.

#3 mdt

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 07:56 AM

The Chef's Table at Teatro Goldoni may be the greatest dining experience in Washington, DC right now.

...

I could go on about the meal as a whole, but why bother? The chef's table at Teatro Goldoni is $125, and you'll keep getting courses until you wave the white flag. With wine pairings, it's an unbelievably cheap $150.

Hmmm, must look at my schedule. The wine pairing is really only $25?! :lol:

#4 Waitman

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Posted 05 December 2008 - 11:54 AM

I am growing pretty immune to the pleasures of eating in the kitchen save when I'm home, the dinner is chicken wings accompanied by a $6.99 Argentinean Malbec and Ugly Betty is on the tube. Hideous lighting, industrial décor – and not the hip TriBeCa/Comet Pizza warehouse kind – and the general sturm und clang of kitchen work kind of negate whatever coolness factor being in the kitchen offers, and watching a line cook finish the veal rapidly becomes less interesting than conversation with my companions.

That being said, I'll eat in Enzo Fargione's kitchen any day. Inspired by Rock's post and compelled by multiple birthdays and family traditions, five of us showed up Wednesday night for a four-hour tour guided by Enzo and our intrepid waiter, Aziz.

Enzo's kitchen is a gleeful contrast to, say, the aggressive minimalism of a Komi dinner or the avant-garde-ness (if you will) of CityZen (not that there's anything wrong with that). Very Italian, it seemed, with Enzo himself as gregarious host. You do not have to be Don Rockwell to get Enzo tableside, in fact he's there with almost every course. Rather than being miffed by a course sent back or only half-eaten, he suggests that you should feel comfortable eating as you will (and, truth be told, all of us would have been more comfortable if we'd passed on couple courses. Problem is, they taste too good not too eat, and you don't want to disappoint so affable and gracious a host). When he says treat the kitchen like your own, you believe him. I asked for a TV so I could watch Ugly Betty.

And while Enzo explains that his cooking is not "Italian" it is sure seemed Italian to me: simple preparations and immaculate ingredients. This is a place for blow-out dinners with friends who might find CityZen and Citronelle a little too weird, but still appreciate excellent food (and don't mind the $125 price tag). I know one of my less progressive friends looked positively relieved when the food came rolling out.

And roll out it did. 15 courses, counting amuses, mostly fish, much to my son's dismay. I was pleasantly surprised, as I always am, when the star dish lived up to its billing. The cigar-box bronzino – slices of raw bronzino, bits of mushroom, scallions and whatever is tossed in a cigar box with a bit smoldering apple-wood where it smokes until brought to the table. The fish, of course, picks up a little flavor but it's the smoke that rises when the box is opened at your seat that makes the dish, tickling your nose as you eat. Everything tastes better by a campfire.

The veal tartar with Italian summer truffle (from Ricardo at Griffin Market), hazelnuts, infused oil, 36-month parmesan and probably some other stuff was excellent The green tea soup with foie gras and crisped leek was spectacular. The prawn soup served in an eggshell with a prawn head emerging alien-like to stair you down was tasty and the most fun visual of the evening. One friend's favorite course was the coffee-press minestrone: vegetables steeped in broth and then strained in a coffee press, with the results then poured into the bowls which are prepared with a cube of something starchy and mashy, possibly cannellini or maybe potato (it was a long night. Sue me). I really loved the gnocchi – a denser variation – with bits of veal cheek and artichoke hearts beneath a parmesan foam and a brutally rich reduction. And the consensus winner was the duck: two small slices set atop another little podium of formed of chestnut paste and cannellinis. Fuckin' amazing.

I won't lie to you: it wasn't perfect. The sea bass was bland. And, contrary to Don's experience, the lobster in the risotto was overcooked and arguably over-salted. Oh well.

I was also not keen on the white wine selection – very small, and almost everything Italian was Pinot Grigio, which all right-thinking people loathe, or was described as "very similar to a Pino Grigio, or made with a French varietal. I'm not a purist, I'm not against Italian Chardonnays or Sauvignon Blancs, but I look forward to a visit to an Italian (or, pick your wine-growing region) restaurant to learn a little more about the local varieties. Which, we did, enjoying a tasty Michele Chiarlo Gavi for $55, an even tastier (but possibly not twice as tasty) La Scolda "Black Label" Gavi for $110, before a forgettable but expensive $150 Italian Chardonnay (Querciabella"Bata'r" I think) ordered for a change of pace. The red wine selection was much broader and we ended up with a Sangiovese/Cabernet/Cabernet Franc blend (Aziz was very eager to sell the non-Italian varietals for some reason, he recommended both this and the unfortunate Chardonnay) Notri"Tua Rita" 2003 which we liked very much for $180.

The cheese course was series of Pecorinos, from different regions and of different ages. Quite fun and I confess that the young, soft Pecorino from the North -- "almost a French Pecorino," grinned Enzo – was my fave. Of course, anything swiped in 100-year old Balsamic or the tomato and wine jellies served with the cheese would have tasted good.

Dessert -- three course -- was almost a duty, we were so stuffed This was unfortunate because the pastry chef has a way with chocolate, best espressed in the espresso "soup" poured into a bowl with stocked three different bites of soft chocolate. And then there's the cannoli which consists of – ahhh, Rocks would kill if I said anything.

Perhaps more than anything, the meal was immensely satisfying. Not that it wasn't delicious, not that it wasn't creative, not that there weren't a couple of post-modern preparations and visual sleights of hand thrown in just to keep if fun. But, more than anything, it all added up to a kind of 21st Century soul food that infuses you with a happy glow and makes you glad you put yourself in Enzo's hands.

Even if it is in a kitchen. :lol:

This is the full menu as we remember it:

Olive thing (paste) on a spoon

Salmon ice cream cone

Square tuna tartar with olive sauce and anchovy puree

Cigar box bronzino

Green tea and foie gras soup with fried leeks

Prawn soup in an eggshell

Veal tartar with Italian summer truffle, hazelnuts, infused oil, 36 month old parmesan

Beet ravioli w/ asparagus and raw quail egg

Lobster Risotto cherry tomato paste

Veal cheek gnocchi with artichoke hearts

Patagonian tooth fish with fennel olive oil

Duck with cannellini and chestnut paste

Six pecorinos of different regions and ages with 100-year-old balsamic vinegar and jellies

Espresso soup and chocolate

Chocolate ganache play-doh with "dusts" (think extruded ganache)

Cannoli


"Don't go braggin' about how cool and clean your kitchen is. 'Caus if your kitchen's so cool and clean, ain't nothin' cookin'!"

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#5 Joe H

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 01:44 PM

Ten of us shared Enzo's Chef's Table last night. I agree with Don: this may be D. C.'s best dining experience right now. At least two dishes (egg shell with head of shrimp sticking out, green pea with foie gras soup and fried leeks) compete for what I believe is the current single best dish in the D. C. area. Truly an extraordinary experience that I salute and applaud Enzo for introducing D. C. to.

#6 Enzo Fargione

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Posted 22 December 2008 - 10:08 AM

Ten of us shared Enzo's Chef's Table last night. I agree with Don: this may be D. C.'s best dining experience right now. At least two dishes (egg shell with head of shrimp sticking out, green pea with foie gras soup and fried leeks) compete for what I believe is the current single best dish in the D. C. area. Truly an extraordinary experience that I salute and applaud Enzo for introducing D. C. to.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the friends and guests who had the chance to dine with me at my chef table
I truly appreciate all of your comments, kind words and support
Mostly, it is great to see so many friends of DonRockwell.com taking the chance to try something new at Teatro and be surprised with the results. It is always nice when people understand the hard work that lies behind a 3 hours dining show
To all of you a wonderful "Happy holidays" with the promise that I would work harder in the new year trying to leave a mark and to surprise you more and more with new altrnatives at the chef table.
For some of you who might be curious to know what we serve and offer, here is a typical menu for the chef table........of course it varies all the time with no notice.
This is a dinner not just for somebody, but for everybody............

Appetite openers:

Deconstructed Sicilian green olives

Gorgonzola pannacotta wrapped in Parma prosciutto and black pepper

Anise dusted seared tuna lollipops

Cornets of vinegar cured salmon belly with crispy fennel and California Osetra caviar

Solid spicy bloody mary on a spoon with candied celery

Mix shellfish broth in an eggshell with basil gelatin infusion

Menu:

4 minutes smoked Branzino carpaccio in a cigar box

Cold Stone style veal filet carpaccio on a marble slab with cornet condiments and black truffles

Green pea cappuccino in an espresso cup with brule`fois gras custard and crispy leeks

Wet/dry instant minestrone soup in a coffee press pot and pesto broth

Lobster risotto with cherry tomatoes confit served in a caviar tin and crispy basil and artichoke chips

Red beets pasta fagottini filled with fonduta cheese and running quail egg asparagus puree` black truffles parmesan shaves

Yukon potato gnocchi in roasted artichoke hearts ragu` braised veal cheeks in port wine and Castelrosso cheese "air"

Two colors miniature open raviolo filled with porcini ragu` creamy robiola cheese sage foam and white truffles

Baked chilean sea bass with 3 fennels and a saffron broth with solid extra virgin olive oil

Salt cured Moularde duck breast and a cube of chestnut puree`braised quince crispy spinach and balsamic chocolate sauce

Pre dessert bites

A study of chocolate and its dusts with chocolate sorbet

Panettone and warm chocolate/ pistachio cider sauce with Christmas ornaments

Cigar on an ashtray with lit spun sugar smoke


Enzo Fargione
Chef/Owner
OSTERIA ELISIR

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#7 adamstr

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Posted 28 December 2008 - 09:51 PM

My fiance ate at the chef's table last Tuesday. I would agree with the previous posts that this meal is probably one of if not the best meal in DC. Highlight of the meal was the veal carpaccio served stone cold creamery style. Veal carpaccio topped with black truffles and placed over balsamic vinaigrette and chestnuts. Accompanying the meat was chanterelles, celery, parmegiano, micro greens and citrus dressing as different "toppings" The whimsy of mixing the dish yourself as well as the different types of crunchy texture was what made this dish for me. Well that, and the fact that it tasted awesome. I would agree that the sea bass was a little flat and while it was good, it was the least favorite for both of us.

My fiance has celiac and the chef was very accommodating. Most courses didn't have gluten to begin with, but the chef was willing to make substitution when necessary. I was served a ravioli, she was served a risotto topped with black truffles. For the desert course, she was served a red wine creme brule. We weren't served a couple of courses (mainly some of pastas), but given the amount we consumed without them, I really didn't mind.

Full meal was:

Deconstructed Sicilian green olives
Tuna lollipops
Bloody Mary
Mix shellfish broth in an eggshell with basil gelatin infusion

Smoked Branzino carpaccio in a cigar box
Cold Stone style veal filet carpaccio on a marble slab with cornet condiments and black truffles
Green pea cappuccino in an espresso cup with brule`fois gras custard and crispy leeks
Lobster risotto with cherry tomatoes confit
Chestnut soup poured over quail eggs, duck sausage and something else I can't remember
Open ravioli served with black truffles. GF substitution: risotto with black truffles
Baked chilean sea bass with 3 fennels and a saffron broth with solid extra virgin olive oil
Salt cured Moularde duck breast and a cube of chestnut puree`braised quince crispy spinach and balsamic chocolate sauce

Desert
Chocolate cake with ganache filling and orange creme topping. GF Subsitution: barolo creme brule

#8 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:10 PM

Salmon belly mixed with cucumber topped with caviar, fennel and sour cream
Posted Image

Deconstructed olive
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Ahi tuna over anchovy garlic sauce topped with crispy capers
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Foie gras topped with yellow tomato marmalade
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Liquid pizza - tomato, olive, creamy mozzarella, anchovy and fried basil leaf
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Artichoke puree topped with olive foam with a corn shoot
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Italian sushi - prosciutto wrapped around cream cheese asparagus and portobello mushroom
Posted Image

#9 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:15 PM

Seafood soup (with shrimp, clam, scallop & squid) with olive oil and basil salt on the side, served in an eggshell
Posted Image

Cigar box branzino with portobello mushroom, flavor enhanced by the smell of burning wood ships
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Foie gras custard in pea soup and fried scallions on top
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Confit of lobster and cherry tomato risotto with fried basil
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Open ravioli, squid ink pasta on the bottom, white pasta on top (with embedded basil leaf), with scallops, artichoke capers, tomato and basil
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Ravioli with fontina cheese and quail egg yolk still runny topped with black truffle and parmesean crisp
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Baby octopus with polenta cream
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Vanilla panna cotta with orange juice reduction
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#10 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 08:15 AM

We were able to secure the chef's table for just the two of us by e-mailing Lindsay at Teatro Goldoni. The tasting is still $125 per person, with wine pairing at $40. I'm not certain that the cost of wine pairing is fixed. As there were two of us and we ordered only 1 pairing, we were downing one glass after another and Aziz just kept bringing out more wine. After the baby octopus, we told Chef Enzo that we're stuffed. He told us there's another duck course before dessert but we passed on it.

Overall impression - Spectacular. This can only be compared to Komi and it is easily just as good. The seafood soup in eggshell was my favorite, every piece of shellfish inside was cooked perfectly tender. Unfortunately Chef Enzo was cooking on the other side of the kitchen from where we were seated so we couldn't watch him work.

#11 Elyssa

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 09:21 AM

Those pictures look incredible!! Thanks so much for sharing. It's a bit out of my price range for right now but it is on my list for a special occasion spot. The chef's table looks amazing!!
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#12 Joe H

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 02:25 PM

We were able to secure the chef's table for just the two of us by e-mailing Lindsay at Teatro Goldoni. The tasting is still $125 per person, with wine pairing at $40. I'm not certain that the cost of wine pairing is fixed. As there were two of us and we ordered only 1 pairing, we were downing one glass after another and Aziz just kept bringing out more wine. After the baby octopus, we told Chef Enzo that we're stuffed. He told us there's another duck course before dessert but we passed on it.

Overall impression - Spectacular. This can only be compared to Komi and it is easily just as good. The seafood soup in eggshell was my favorite, every piece of shellfish inside was cooked perfectly tender. Unfortunately Chef Enzo was cooking on the other side of the kitchen from where we were seated so we couldn't watch him work.

Eric, I'm really glad that you were able to experience this. Enzo does a phenominal job with the chef's table!

#13 The Hersch

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 05:39 PM

Eric, I'm really glad that you were able to experience this. Enzo does a phenominal job with the chef's table!

Yes, indeed. I was one of a party of five at the chef's table earlier this month, and it was among the most memorable meals of my life. Several of the dishes pictured above appeared in our dinner. The artichoke puree with olive oil foam was our very first course, and though the rest of the meal was in no way a let-down, this was narrowly my favorite dish of the night. The one dish (out of I don't remember how many, but about 15 I think) that seemed a failure to me is also among the pictures above: the salmon "ice-cream cone" thing, which in our case I don't think had any caviar topping. The tuile/biscuit thing it was served in was way too sweet for this; I thought it didn't work at all. It actually seemed like a mistake, like they accidentally used the dessert tuile instead of the intended non-dessert one. Anyway, that was the only mis-step in the whole magnificent array of stupendous indulgence. We were all very happy.

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Who taught my grief to thee?


#14 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 22 March 2009 - 05:45 PM

I'm with Waitman on the lobster in the risotto - tough. As for the salmon belly in the cone, we loved the mixture of texture, soft belly, crunchy cukes, and crispy cone - yes the cone was a little overpowering on the sweet side and the salmon lost in the ingredients, but what an interesting PARTY IN MY MOUTH. Oh, everything is in the order we were served.

#15 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 08:18 AM

So...this is the must try place it seems. As good as Maestro was? Arguably the best in DC right now? Those are strong words. I might just have to check it out. How hard is it to secure a spot at the Chef's Table? And, must you book the whole of the table (6 seats, right?) or will they fit you in based on availability?

All you have to do is e-mail the restaurant. You don't have to book the whole table. We were able to get the table just for the two of us on a Saturday night.

#16 youngfood

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 12:24 PM

The Chef's Table at Teatro Goldoni may be the greatest dining experience in Washington, DC right now. A single table, seating up to six people, set off to the side of the kitchen. Like the way it used to be at Roberto Donna's Laboratorio, Enzo Fargione turns the chef's table into his private playground, first asking if there are any allergies, then trying to gage about how many courses the diners wish to experience, then going off on his freakishly talented tangent, producing course-after-course that not just dazzle the diner, but instill a sense of absolute humility, such as he did when he served me the lobster risotto.
...
Give this incredible genius free reign to cook for you until you can take no more, and revel in what might be the single best meal served in Washington, DC on the night you go. And save room for the cannoli! One hint about the cannoli: Enzo is a big fan of cigars, and that's all I'm going to say.

"This is as good as Maestro was, you know," I said to my friend.

"Oh, I like this better than I ever liked Maestro," was the response. "The last meal I had where I enjoyed every component was at Pierre Gagnaire." The difference being, of course, that both of those restaurants were bringing it for the entire dining room, whereas this is for a select, fortunate few. And there's also no doubting the difference in atmosphere, service, kitchen staff, etc.

I cannot tell you how unearthly the chef's table is at Teatro Goldoni. You can bring a bottle of wine for $25 (please do it discretely). I can't rate the entire restaurant bold in the dining guide, because I'm well aware that people dining in the dining room aren't dining at this level.

I don't know what else to say. I'm in awe of Enzo Fargione. Absolute awe.

Cheers,
Rocks.

... That being said, I'll eat in Enzo Fargione's kitchen any day. Inspired by Rock's post and compelled by multiple birthdays and family traditions, five of us showed up Wednesday night for a four-hour tour guided by Enzo and our intrepid waiter, Aziz.

Enzo's kitchen is a gleeful contrast to, say, the aggressive minimalism of a Komi dinner or the avant-garde-ness (if you will) of CityZen (not that there's anything wrong with that). Very Italian, it seemed, with Enzo himself as gregarious host. You do not have to be Don Rockwell to get Enzo tableside, in fact he's there with almost every course. Rather than being miffed by a course sent back or only half-eaten, he suggests that you should feel comfortable eating as you will (and, truth be told, all of us would have been more comfortable if we'd passed on couple courses. Problem is, they taste too good not too eat, and you don't want to disappoint so affable and gracious a host).

Ten of us shared Enzo's Chef's Table last night. I agree with Don: this may be D. C.'s best dining experience right now. At least two dishes (egg shell with head of shrimp sticking out, green pea with foie gras soup and fried leeks) compete for what I believe is the current single best dish in the D. C. area. Truly an extraordinary experience that I salute and applaud Enzo for introducing D. C. to.

Overall impression - Spectacular. This can only be compared to Komi and it is easily just as good.

I had a hard time believing that any place that I'd never been before would live up to the hype that the Enzo Fagione's Chef's Table received in recent posts here, but I have to say that I concur. A recent meal here was as tasty and interesting as any I have had in recent memory. And the Chef really does treat the table as if it is his own, delivering and describing the innumerable courses and adjusting the menu to your tastes and the amount of room in your stomach. I think Don wrote somewhere that the Chef was demonstrating "Maestro-like creativity" and that description seems spot on, especially throughout the Komi-like opening series of small bites. I'd also note some Citonelle-like creativity, in particular in his bacon n eggs panna cotta and the presentation of the lobster risotto a la Chef Richard's "Lobster begula." The atmosphere here wont be mistaken for the Tasting Room at Eve and the wine pairings aren't selected and served by Mark Slater (ie nowhere near the level of the chef's creations -- though quite generous, I doubt I'd do them again), but the superlatives about the overall experience of having an extremely talented and creative chef prepare a meal with his own hands just for your table clearly justifies the high price of admission. Next time you are plotting a several course feast, add this table to the list of places you consider.

#17 CajunJason

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 04:43 PM

I have a reservation for the Chef's Table on Friday. I can't remember the last time I was this excited about a meal :rolleyes:
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#18 Enzo Fargione

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 01:38 PM

To all friends and foodies:

The Chef Table at Teatro Goldoni is going through a major face lift and reorganization process.

It is my personal and humble goal to create one of the most memorable culinary experiences in one of the most classy and charismatic settings where the chef is able not only to cook, but also to interact with the guests, discuss each course and give a personal input about food and wine

The new chef table will be called “Enzo Fargione’s Chef Table” and it will make its debut in approximately 2 weeks.

The new chef table has been upgraded with brand new china, silverware, glassware and every possible first class tool in order to offer polished service in a luxurious setting

I am personally involved with the selection and creation of the new table top and of course new dishes to complement the upcoming Fall/Winter season

The price will remain the same at $125.00 per person with the additional option of wine pairing at $45.00 per person

Because the removal of kitchen equipment the new chef table now seats 8 people comfortably. Reservations for larger parties can be made and served up to 12 guests in the room next to the kitchen called “Rigoletto”

As usual the menu will feature anywhere from 15 to 20 course and reservations are required.
The only 2 times to reserve the Chef Table are 7pm or 7:30 pm

My publicist Janet Donovan will provide more detailed information once we‘re near with the opening and inauguration.

I thank you all for taking the time to read this and for your continuous support

Chef Enzo Fargione
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#19 Enzo Fargione

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 01:39 PM

To all friends and foodies:

The Chef Table at Teatro Goldoni is going through a major face lift and reorganization process.

It is my personal and humble goal to create one of the most memorable culinary experiences in one of the most classy and charismatic settings where the chef is able not only to cook, but also to interact with the guests, discuss each course and give a personal input about food and wine

The new chef table will be called “Enzo Fargione’s Chef Table” and it will make its debut in approximately 2 weeks.

The new chef table has been upgraded with brand new china, silverware, glassware and every possible first class tool in order to offer polished service in a luxurious setting

I am personally involved with the selection and creation of the new table top and of course new dishes to complement the upcoming Fall/Winter season

The price will remain the same at $125.00 per person with the additional option of wine pairing at $45.00 per person

Because the removal of kitchen equipment the new chef table now seats 8 people comfortably. Reservations for larger parties can be made and served up to 12 guests in the room next to the kitchen called “Rigoletto”

As usual the menu will feature anywhere from 15 to 20 course and reservations are required.
The only 2 times to reserve the Chef Table are 7pm or 7:30 pm

My publicist Janet Donovan will provide more detailed information once we‘re near with the opening and inauguration.

I thank you all for taking the time to read this and for your continuous support

Chef Enzo Fargione
Enzo Fargione
Chef/Owner
OSTERIA ELISIR

Website - Facebook

#20 Tim Carman

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 02:49 PM

A look inside the revamped chef's table at Teatro. Enzo Fargione is clearly aiming for the (four) stars.
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#21 DonRocks

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 03:25 PM

Enzo Fargione is clearly aiming for the (four) stars.

He already got them.

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#22 DanCole42

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 10:40 AM

A look inside the revamped chef's table at Teatro. Enzo Fargione is clearly aiming for the (four) stars.

I'm sorry. The chef's table might be god's gift to the gullet, but I couldn't enjoy it knowing that Fargione was going full steam ahead at the expense of his "other" restaurant. The aim of the chef is supposed to be the enjoyment/happiness of their guests, not stars.

I have no problem with a chef focusing on other projects, but that key element of the "hospitality" industry should not be ignored to the degree I saw during my (admittedly single) visit to Teatro Goldoni.

There are plenty of chefs in the area who put their guests first, and that's where I want to spend my money; even if I might be missing out on "one of the best culinary experiences in the area."
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#23 DonRocks

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 10:45 AM

I'm sorry. The chef's table might be god's gift to the gullet, but I couldn't enjoy it knowing that Fargione was going full steam ahead at the expense of his "other" restaurant. The aim of the chef is supposed to be the enjoyment/happiness of their guests, not stars.

I have no problem with a chef focusing on other projects, but that key element of the "hospitality" industry should not be ignored to the degree I saw during my (admittedly single) visit to Teatro Goldoni.

There are plenty of chefs in the area who put their guests first, and that's where I want to spend my money; even if I might be missing out on "one of the best culinary experiences in the area."

Just think of it as La Turque taking away what would normally go into the AOC Côte-Rôtie. :angry:

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#24 RWBooneJr.

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 04:38 PM

I'm sorry. The chef's table might be god's gift to the gullet, but I couldn't enjoy it knowing that Fargione was going full steam ahead at the expense of his "other" restaurant. The aim of the chef is supposed to be the enjoyment/happiness of their guests, not stars.

I have no problem with a chef focusing on other projects, but that key element of the "hospitality" industry should not be ignored to the degree I saw during my (admittedly single) visit to Teatro Goldoni.

There are plenty of chefs in the area who put their guests first, and that's where I want to spend my money; even if I might be missing out on "one of the best culinary experiences in the area."

An Italian chef making a name for himself and his otherwise unremarkable restaurant with his Laboritorio...er, I mean, Chef's Table? In Washington, DC? Unprecedented.

#25 Pat

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 12:25 PM

An Italian chef making a name for himself and his otherwise unremarkable restaurant with his Laboritorio...er, I mean, Chef's Table? In Washington, DC? Unprecedented.

From Todd's chat today. See exchange with Manassas. Ouch.

#26 DanielK

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 10:15 PM

If the interwebs are to be believed, this thread can be closed.

just spotted on Chowhound:

After making reservations about 2 months ago for Chef Enzo's table for my birthday this weekend, I was called by the restaurant today to inform me that they had parted ways with Chef Enzo.



#27 fuzzy510

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 06:37 PM

Carman reporting that Enzo's out, too. ;)

http://www.washingto...teatro-goldoni/

#28 Tim Carman

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 06:38 PM

The news is regrettably true. Enzo Fargione was fired as chef at Teatro Goldoni.
Tim Carman
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Washington Post
Phone: 202-334-6587
E-mail: carmant@washpost.com

#29 DonRocks

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 07:31 PM

The news is regrettably true. Enzo Fargione was fired as chef at Teatro Goldoni.

Note also that the chef's table has been booked 2-3 weeks in advance. Caveat emptor.

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#30 RWBooneJr.

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 11:20 PM

I never sat at the chef's table, but I ate at the restaurant both before and while Chef Fargione was there. It was a terribly decorated space, set up in a decades-ago era of expense account silliness, that never modernized. The service and management always seemed disinterested when I was there. And the chef's table never bled into the dining room. It sounds like the chef's table was essentially it's own restaurant and now deserves to be. People, like me, will pay for that experience, we just won't if we're turned off by the place that houses it.

#31 Enzo Fargione

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 08:38 AM

I never sat at the chef's table, but I ate at the restaurant both before and while Chef Fargione was there. It was a terribly decorated space, set up in a decades-ago era of expense account silliness, that never modernized. The service and management always seemed disinterested when I was there. And the chef's table never bled into the dining room. It sounds like the chef's table was essentially it's own restaurant and now deserves to be. People, like me, will pay for that experience, we just won't if we're turned off by the place that houses it.

Somehow, you just nailed it!!!

I wish I had cooked for you at the Chef'sTable. Hopefully I will have the pleasure to have you in my new place once opened.

Enzo Fargione
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#32 Pool Boy

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 10:03 AM

I wish I had cooked for you at the Chef'sTable. Hopefully I will have the pleasure to have you in my new place once opened.

Enzo Fargione

Sorry to hear this, I'd always hoped to get there someday.

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#33 Sthitch

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 10:16 AM

Enzo Fargione

Good luck with the new place, I loved your feature in the new Art Culinaire.

#34 Joe H

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 10:41 AM

Somehow, you just nailed it!!!

I wish I had cooked for you at the Chef'sTable. Hopefully I will have the pleasure to have you in my new place once opened.

Enzo Fargione

Chef, I have long believed that extraordinary experiences have "windows" that we should take advantage of as soon as they open up. There was a time in the '90's when Jean Louis was at the Watergate, in the 2000's Roberto was at his Lab and Fabio at Maestro, Michel at Citronelle then, most recently yourself at your Chef's Table. For the past several years you have provided one of the finest, most creative dining experiences anywhere-and you personally prepared and served it yourself!! A truly remarkable and extraordinary evening for those fortunate to visit you.

But now it is over. Also, Table 21 at Volt is now eight seats and has two seatings even on weeknights-the four hour dinner there with the 7 start time is history there, too.

Roberto returns with Galileo III and his Lab in early May. I look forward to your new restaurant Enzo. For those reading this we should not wait to go or to "hear how it is." We should find out. As soon as we are able. As soon as you open your new door. Unfortunately windows have a habit of closing, even for the absolute best.

Best of luck, Chef!

#35 Enzo Fargione

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 10:50 PM

Chef, I have long believed that extraordinary experiences have "windows" that we should take advantage of as soon as they open up. There was a time in the '90's when Jean Louis was at the Watergate, in the 2000's Roberto was at his Lab and Fabio at Maestro, Michel at Citronelle then, most recently yourself at your Chef's Table. For the past several years you have provided one of the finest, most creative dining experiences anywhere-and you personally prepared and served it yourself!! A truly remarkable and extraordinary evening for those fortunate to visit you.

But now it is over. Also, Table 21 at Volt is now eight seats and has two seatings even on weeknights-the four hour dinner there with the 7 start time is history there, too.

Roberto returns with Galileo III and his Lab in early May. I look forward to your new restaurant Enzo. For those reading this we should not wait to go or to "hear how it is." We should find out. As soon as we are able. As soon as you open your new door. Unfortunately windows have a habit of closing, even for the absolute best.

Best of luck, Chef!

Thank you Joe
Your ever ending support is always appreciated
Enzo
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#36 Tim Carman

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 02:10 PM

More bad news for Teatro.
Tim Carman
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Phone: 202-334-6587
E-mail: carmant@washpost.com

#37 Enzo Fargione

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 08:45 AM

Just a quick response for those who keep asking and calling with the same question: NO I am not associated with Teatro Goldoni anymore.
They do have a new website who states I am onboard: how convenient! They are still displaying pictures of me, all articles and accolades featuring my work of what once was the Chef's Table
I find highly disturbing the fact they refuse to take down website postings with my name and picture so that they can financially benefit while sending a wrong message to their customers and trick them into a fake dining scenario
This shows how unfair and how unjust this situation is as I see it as a lose lose situation for all : myself, the customers, Teatro
It would be so much easier to been able to sit down and work out differences other then spending useless piles of money in lawsuits!!
The search for a location for my restaurant continues............
Thank you all
Enzo Fargione
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