Jump to content


Photo

Low-Iodine Life

Heather Shorters Low-Iodine Blog for Thyroid Cancer Survivors

  • Please log in to reply
101 replies to this topic

#1 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 02:45 PM

(Mods: I am not sure this belongs here. Feel free to move it to wherever it best fits.)

Some older Rockwellians may recall that I am a thyroid cancer survivor. I had a thyroidectomy in February of 2006, followed by a month of a low iodine diet and then radioactive iodine (I-131) therapy to nuke any remaining bad thyroid cells . To make sure the cancer hasn't returned, once a year I must go on a low iodine diet for a month, receive a low dose of I-131, and then have a full body scan to look for any traces of the element. The idea is to starve the body of iodine so that even a tiny amount of rogue thyroid cells would be picked up by the scan.

To be very blunt, the diet sucks. A lot. Here's a list of what is not allowed:

iodized salt or sea salt
Dairy products (milk, butter, yogurt, ice cream, cheese)
Vitamins (most multis add iodine)
Food and meds that contain Red dye FD&C #3
Egg yolks, whole eggs, or food containing them
Seafood (fish, shellfish, seaweed, kelp)
Foods that contain the additives: carragen, agar-agar, algin, algin= ates
Cured and corned meats
Breads with iodate dough conditioners
Chocolate (milk added)
Soy and soy products (soy sauce, tofu, soy milk)
Potato skins
Some beans (pinto, navy beans, lima beans, red kidney beans,)
Restaurant food
Processed foods, since there is no reliable way of knowing what kind of salt is used

Rice is allowed in very limited amounts.

Basically, I can have meat cooked at home, fresh fruits and vegetables, homemade bread, egg whites, and some grain products. Fortunately, booze is not forbidden. Posted Image

I am going to try to keep a food diary here in case anyone wants to follow along at home, but mostly for my own encouragement. This diet is very very difficult to stick to, and I will have to be very organized to avoid careless eating because I was unprepared.

Forgot to add, the diet starts 4/12, so I have a month to start filling the freezer & get into the right headspace.

#2 monavano

monavano

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,245 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 02:54 PM

(Mods: I am not sure this belongs here. Feel free to move it to wherever it best fits.)

Some older Rockwellians may recall that I am a thyroid cancer survivor. I had a thyroidectomy in February of 2006, followed by a month of a low iodine diet and then radioactive iodine (I-131) therapy to nuke any remaining bad thyroid cells . To make sure the cancer doesn't return, once a year I must go on a low iodine diet for a month, receive a low dose of I-131, and then have a full body scan to look for any traces of the element. The idea is to starve the body of iodine so that even a tiny amount of rogue thyroid cells would be picked up by the scan.

To be very blunt, the diet sucks. A lot. Here's a list of what is not allowed:

iodized salt or sea salt
Dairy products (milk, butter, yogurt, ice cream, cheese)
Vitamins (most multis add iodine)
Food and meds that contain Red dye FD&C #3
Egg yolks, whole eggs, or food containing them
Seafood (fish, shellfish, seaweed, kelp)
Foods that contain the additives: carragen, agar-agar, algin, algin= ates
Cured and corned meats
Breads with iodate dough conditioners
Chocolate (milk added)
Soy and soy products (soy sauce, tofu,
Potato skins
Some beans (pinto, navy beans, lima beans, red kidney beans,)
Restaurant food
Processed foods, since there is no reliable way of knowing what kind of salt is used

Rice is allowed in very limited amounts.

Basically, I can have meat cooked at home, fresh fruits and vegetables, homemade bread, egg whites, and some grain products. Fortunately, booze is not forbidden. ;)

I am going to try to keep a food diary here in case anyone wants to follow along at home, but mostly for my own encouragement. This diet is very very difficult to stick to, and I will have to be very organized to avoid careless eating because I was unprepared.

This sounds very interesting and challenging, Heather. Hang in there, and make a reservation for you favorite restaurant so you have something to look forward to!

#3 TheMatt

TheMatt

    Man Among Men

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 584 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 03:12 PM

I'll be following along. If you have a chance, post some no/low-iodine recipes that you make. I know I've seen RAI recipes before (friends with thyroid issues), but I'd love to see what a foodie might come up with.

And I'm surprised most multivitamins add iodine. I guess I figured that'd be overkill due to iodized salt and cow's milk.

I suppose this also means you'll get to carry around a doctor's note for a while as well. Airports, DoD facilities...all must be fun with radioactive sweat.

TheMatt
Certified Nerd and Oh So Boring...


#4 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 03:38 PM

Yes, I do have to carry a doctor's note when I fly or risk setting off detectors. Also, for several days after I get the radioactive pill I can't be around my kids, have to wash my clothes separately, eat from separate dishes, wash out the tub after I shower, etc.

#5 ScotteeM

ScotteeM

    Foie Gras

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,158 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 03:45 PM

Heather,
I'm so glad you posted this, and I will be following this thread with interest. I am one year in on my very strict wheat/gluten-free diet, so I understand the challenges (logistical, actual, mental, and emotional) of embarking on a restricted eating plan. The first few weeks I focused so much on everything I couldn't have that I burst into tears in the grocery store at least twice. I eventually learned to focus on what I could have, and I have learned what questions to ask to safely dine in restaurants (some are safe, others not so much).

I am sure that you will find good things to eat, and will get helpful input from fellow Rockwellians. I'll keep my eyes open for suggestions to pass along.

Dona Animella


#6 ScotteeM

ScotteeM

    Foie Gras

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,158 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 03:45 PM

Yes, I do have to carry a doctor's note when I fly or risk setting off detectors. Also, for several days after I get the radioactive pill I can't be around my kids, have to wash my clothes separately, eat from separate dishes, wash out the tub after I shower, etc.

Staying away from your kids has got to be a hard one!

Dona Animella


#7 ScotteeM

ScotteeM

    Foie Gras

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,158 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 05:08 PM

I'm a big fan of the Simply Recipes blog, and this recipe for Beet Hummus would qualify as low-iodine if you use Kosher salt. This is the latest recipe on the blog, and I'm eager to try it myself, on cucumber slices.

Dona Animella


#8 Malawry

Malawry

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 139 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 09:34 PM

I too will be following with interest. Isn't cancer punishing enough without these crappy dietary machinations? Heather, would you like for me to prepare a meal that fits these requirements for you sometime? Could be a fun project if you feel like driving out here.
Rochelle Reid Myers

Lots of Everything

#9 saf

saf

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 10:25 PM

Some older Rockwellians may recall that I am a thyroid cancer survivor. I had a thyroidectomy in February of 2006, followed by a month of a low iodine diet and then radioactive iodine (I-131) therapy to nuke any remaining bad thyroid cells . To make sure the cancer Hasn't returned, once a year I must go on a low iodine diet for a month, receive a low dose of I-131, and then have a full body scan to look for any traces of the element. The idea is to starve the body of iodine so that even a tiny amount of rogue thyroid cells would be picked up by the scan.

To be very blunt, the diet sucks. A lot.

Huh. I had that too, diagnosed and treated in early 05. Although I have been lucky - since 07 they have done my followup with thyrogen shots rather than with the evil diet.

Oh how I hate that diet. HATE that diet. I also hate the hypothyroidism they have required with the scans. Although when you're that run down from the hypo, you're not hungry! (Then again, despite the stupid diet and no appetite, I gained major weight from the hypo state last time.)

I learned to make sorbet when I had to do the diet in July and couldn't have ice cream. It goes well with angel food cake. Homemade hummus and pita worked well. Roasted chicken was good. Fruit was good.

Anyhow, I'm interested in the food diary because I will have to do this again some time, and I intend to steal every good idea you have.

Sarah In Petworth


#10 mame11

mame11

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts

Posted 02 March 2010 - 11:06 PM

Heather, I hate that you have to do this but it's wonderful that you can! You should start a blog dedicated to this project so that an even wider audience than DR.com can read it. I imagine it would be a good resource. (though definitely post the blog here too...i'm lazy)

Here is one thought, substitute jicama and cucumber where you would use crackers.

Peanuts seem to be okay on your diet, so you could make your own peanut butter to not use salt. I hear it's easy to do and really delicious. Hmm... peanut butter and banana. peanut butter and apple...

Can you have oatmeal? I'll look for a recipe I have for "oatmeal cakes" which are delicious. They aren't cakes per se, more like a potato pancake savory thing.

#11 FunnyJohn

FunnyJohn

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,020 posts

Posted 03 March 2010 - 05:34 AM

WoW Heather! This is quite a challenge -- especially because of what's at stake. If you screw up do you have to start over again for another month? Thank God Booze isn't included, but I guess you have to be careful with that food group too lest you get led astray under the influence. When you're through it you can bang the drum and eat an omelette with charcuterie.

John Herzberg
Boulevardier
Bon Vivant
Besotted
Epistemological Optimist


"I would like to take you seriously, but to do so would affront your intelligence."
"You too can have the soothing feeling of nature's own baby-soft wool being pulled over your resting eyes." - Herb Block


#12 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 03 March 2010 - 07:12 AM

I too will be following with interest. Isn't cancer punishing enough without these crappy dietary machinations? Heather, would you like for me to prepare a meal that fits these requirements for you sometime? Could be a fun project if you feel like driving out here.

Yes, it is! I would love to have you cook for me anytime. What an incredibly nice offer. ;) Thank you.

WoW Heather! This is quite a challenge -- especially because of what's at stake. If you screw up do you have to start over again for another month? Thank God Booze isn't included, but I guess you have to be careful with that food group too lest you get led astray under the influence. When you're through it you can bang the drum and eat an omelette with charcuterie.

If I screw up once, it doesn't matter too much. If I screw up repeatedly, it will make the scan less accurate and it might miss something. You're right, if I go out for a couple of glasses of wine & decide I'm hungry, it's too tempting to say that "this one time won't matter."

I thought about it after my first time through this, and decided that shrimp fried rice had the greatest combination of forbidden foods (seafood, rice, eggs, soy). So when my scan is over I always get shrimp fried rice for lunch. :P

#13 DPop

DPop

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 693 posts

Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:25 AM

Fortunately, booze is not forbidden. ;)

Until I got to this statement I was thinking to myself "How in the world could she survive without a breakdown?"

#14 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 06:47 AM

Diet starts a week from Monday, so I am concentrating on cleaning out the fridge of convenience food that might tempt me. The Giant in downtown Silver Spring on East-West Hwy used to stock a brand of bread that used kosher salt and no conditioners - I need to go and see if they still carry it. I also need to make a trip to Whole Foods and get a jar of no-salt mustard, and stock up on their no-salt canned chick peas, tahini, and peanut butter. Next Sunday I'll shop for meat. Since it's one of the few treats I can have, it's a good time to indulge in things like lamb chops which I normally pass up as too expensive. Also on the plan are a few batches of homemade pickles & relishes, since they use non-iodized pickling salt.

I also need to look for a multivitamin w/out iodine, and double up on my calcium citrate (rather than carbonate) and vitamin D supplements. The thyroid & parathyroid are essential for regulating calcium and vitamin D levels in the body, and removing them mandates lifelong supplements. Part of the bloodwork my doc orders every three months tests my levels of vitamin D, and the last round showed that my levels were very low. I have some mild symptoms of Osteomalacia, so she has doubled my supplements, and they will have to be upped again while I can't have dairy. It will help that the weather is nicer now & I can get more sunshine, because the vitamin D we make naturally through sun exposure is better than pills.

#15 porcupine

porcupine

    ill-tempered sea bass

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,892 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 07:31 AM

Heather, you might want to investigate Bethesda Co-op. I don't know if they carry exactly what you're looking for, but they do offer a wide range of diet specific foods (a section of gluten-free products, for example), and a large selection of supplements. They don't carry meat, though. ;)

Elizabeth Miller
fast cars, slow food

http://elizaberryblog.wordpress.com/


#16 squidsdc

squidsdc

    ika

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,258 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 07:44 AM

If the Giant doesn't carry the bread anymore, try Magruder's in Kemp Mill, or Shaul's in the same shopping center (albeit not open today.) Passover is a great time to get breads without soybean oil, but I don't know about the other ingredients. Some of the La Brea breads carried at HT also do not have soy, but again, I don't know about the other ingredients.

Thanks for doing this blog; I look forward to keeping up with it. As a matter of fact, because of this I have found about the role of the thyroid with Vitamin D. I had extremely low levels last year and needed an Rx supplement. While I was told this was becoming a very common occurrence with T1 diabetics, the connecting line was never drawn for me between the also common Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and low levels of Vitamin D.

I thought I had heard about a store that carried no-salt products in Rockville--was that you who mentioned it? And yes, you couldn't ask for a better forecast this week, so enjoy the sunshine!

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain"--The Great Oz


#17 KMango

KMango

    Mischieftain

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,174 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 07:55 AM

Heather, you might want to investigate Bethesda Co-op. I don't know if they carry exactly what you're looking for, but they do offer a wide range of diet specific foods (a section of gluten-free products, for example), and a large selection of supplements. They don't carry meat, though. ;)

And some late-breaking news: I was there yesterday and saw bison (Gunpowder Bison & Trading) in the freezer along with a few other selections.

Heather, thanks again for these postings.
-KMango

"Everyone expects me to do certain things. It puts a ceiling on your progress. You’re blocked by your pride. To get good, you have to throw your board around and fall." -Rodney Mullen

#18 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,771 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 11:07 AM

I recently began making bread, using the 18-hour rise, no-knead method that a number of people on DR have talked about. It's simple enough that I have been doing it every few days. If you start a batch after dinner, you can bake it the next day when you come home from work. That way, you can have bread you know has no dough conditioners or iodized salt in it.

#19 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 04:09 PM

I recently began making bread, using the 18-hour rise, no-knead method that a number of people on DR have talked about. It's simple enough that I have been doing it every few days. If you start a batch after dinner, you can bake it the next day when you come home from work. That way, you can have bread you know has no dough conditioners or iodized salt in it.

That's a good idea, Zora. I have made bread during previous low-iodine stints. The store-bought handy to keep in the freezer just in case. I will look up the no-knead recipe.

#20 marketfan

marketfan

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 301 posts

Posted 09 April 2010 - 07:40 PM

How is it going, Heather???

#21 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 09 April 2010 - 07:58 PM

How is it going, Heather???

Diet starts on Monday! I'm spending this week eating all the stuff I can't have for a month.

#22 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 12 April 2010 - 07:15 PM

I was traveling for the morning/afternoon, so diet starts tomorrow. I went to the grocery, and the bread I was able to eat is no longer stocked, so I will have to make my own. Stocked up on fruit & vegetables. I also picked up some calcium enriched orange juice. I don't usually drink juice, but will for the next month since milk is forbidden.

#23 thatguy2009

thatguy2009

    clam

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

Posted 13 April 2010 - 03:06 AM

www.thebeautifultruthmovie.com has anyone see this? :lol:

#24 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 13 April 2010 - 08:18 AM

www.thebeautifultruthmovie.com has anyone see this? :lol:

No, and I don't intend to.

Day 1. Breakfast time is the worst, especially if I'm unprepared. So far today I've had meds & 2 cups of coffee, which have made me nauseated and unmotivated to cook anything. A trip to Whole Foods has to happen this morning, to get fresh unsalted peanut butter & unsalted matzoh. Those are my emergency convenience foods, along with homemade hummus.

I can feel the frustration and depression starting already, but can't give in to them.

#25 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 13 April 2010 - 09:54 AM

Lunch: grilled chicken breast, orzo & green bean salad dressed with olive oil, meyer lemon juice, lemon zest, salt & pepper.

Since butter is a no-no, I use this diet as an excuse to buy excellent olive, walnut, pumpkin seed, and sesame oils for flavoring.

#26 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 13 April 2010 - 05:52 PM

Icky weather cancelled my grilling plans, so lunch was a hamburger sans bun, with suateed mushrooms and the aforementioned orzo & green beans.

Made the trek to Whole Foods and was very excited to find that their corn tortillas don't have salt, just corn! That means chicken or beef tacos and enchiladas, if I feel like making sauce.

#27 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 14 April 2010 - 06:28 PM

No breakfast today. There's so little "breakfast food" that is allowed that I had a handful of unsalted nuts, some juice, and a banana in the morning. Lunch was chicken with more orzo & salad. Pear for snack.

For dinner I mixed onions, garlic, ground beef, black beans, orzo, and chili seasonings and stuffed it into green peppers. I baked the peppers, covered, in a casserole with canned tomatoes poured around it. They're not bad, would be better with cheese.

A batch of foccacia is rising on the counter right now, so I'll have bread for tomorrow.

#28 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 14 April 2010 - 07:12 PM

Snacking on a little hot rosemary focaccia & homemade hummus. It doesn't suck.

#29 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,771 posts

Posted 15 April 2010 - 04:05 PM

That means chicken or beef tacos and enchiladas, if I feel like making sauce.

For a super-fast enchilada sauce, roast an onion, some garlic, tomatillos and green chile (either a poblano or a couple or three jalapeños) in a hot oven until softened and blackened. Peel the chiles and throw everything in the blender with a small slug of cider vinegar, a handful of cilantro and a little water or chicken stock and some kosher salt. Blend until smooth. You can use it just like that, or what I do is then simmer it on the stovetop for about 15 minutes so all the flavors have a chance to blend.

#30 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 15 April 2010 - 08:15 PM

For a super-fast enchilada sauce, roast an onion, some garlic, tomatillos and green chile (either a poblano or a couple or three jalapeños) in a hot oven until softened and blackened. Peel the chiles and throw everything in the blender with a small slug of cider vinegar, a handful of cilantro and a little water or chicken stock and some kosher salt. Blend until smooth. You can use it just like that, or what I do is then simmer it on the stovetop for about 15 minutes so all the flavors have a chance to blend.

Thanks, Zora! I think I will try that this weekend.

Today's meals were:

Breakfast: coffee
Lunch: roast chicken, tomatoes, and hummus on the homemade focaccia for lunch.
Snacks: Pear, banana, cashews and more focaccia.
Dinner: grilled steak, grilled peppers, the inside of a baked potato, and mushrooms sauteed with olive oil, garlic, thyme, rosemary, and sherry.

On the down side, I'm getting tired more easily, and have to remind myself to eat. On the up side, I've lost a few pounds already.

#31 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 16 April 2010 - 05:58 AM

Today I have to make bread again. I would gladly pay someone to bake for me while I'm doing this. I'm a very good baker, but bread is not one of my better subjects.

I planned ahead & saved some of the mushrooms & grilled peppers from dinner to put in an egg white omelet. That will be breakfast, along with a banana & juice.

#32 DonRocks

DonRocks

    leviathan

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,919 posts

Posted 16 April 2010 - 11:44 AM

Have you found this?

dcdining.com - Restaurant Reviews - Facebook <--- LIKE Meeeeeeee! Twitter <--- FOLLOW Meeeeeeee!

If you're a member here, please Friend me personally on Facebook (send me a message with your screen name, please, so I know which member you are!)


#33 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 16 April 2010 - 12:04 PM

Have you found this?

No! Thanks Don, I had no idea Steven had I-131 treatment. I haven't logged in to eGullet in months.

#34 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 16 April 2010 - 05:05 PM

The reason I'm doing this. :lol:

(Link should be fixed. Thanks, Don.)

#35 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 16 April 2010 - 06:22 PM

I posted in the dinner thread that orange juice would be dinner tonight, but at 5:30 something made me think of Lebanese Taverna, and of the tahine sauce they serve with some of their pita sandwiches, and that made me think of my Time-Life Foods of the World book, Middle Eastern Cooking. The spiral bound recipe book included a recipe for taratoor, which is a simple emulsified sauce of garlic, tahine, lemon juice, salt, and water. I had attempted pita bread earlier which didn't rise, but it made an acceptable flatbread sandwich with sliced hot house tomato, sweet onions, and the taratoor liberally poured over it. That and some sliced cucumber were dinner.

The recipe book has lots of recipes that don't include any forbidden ingredients, so I'll be exploring those cuisines over the next couple of weeks.

(Have to add that the $100 I spent at the Goodwill book sale 20+ years ago on the entire Time-Life Foods of the World series, including all the recipe books, counts as one of the best investments I've ever made. They are a constant source of inspiration.)

#36 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 17 April 2010 - 05:01 PM

Today I pulled out a couple of Indian cookbooks, Mahdur Jaffrey's Quick and Easy Indian Cooking and Monica Bhide's The Spice Is Right, looking for inspiration. Some Indian recipes call for butter or dairy, but there are a lot of wonderful recipes that are high in flavor and don't have forbidden ingredients. Monday's meal will include Monica's Pork Vindaloo, and Jaffrey's Cauliflower with ginger, garlic & green chilies. Basmati rice is mentioned as being the lowest in iodine, so I'll make a triple batch and refrigerate some for future meals.

#37 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 08:30 AM

It feels weird talking about myself here. I'm not sure this log is going to interesting enough to sustain for another 3 weeks. We'll see.

Emma found a recipe in Mollie Katzan's kid cookbook Honest Pretzels for a one-pan vegan chocolate cake that uses cocoa powder and vegetable oil. It tastes pretty good, and it's wonderful to have a dessert option other than sorbet.

Breakfast remains a problem. Surliness gets in the way of creativity, and I wind up either eating nothing (not ideal) or scrounging for leftovers. Need a system...

#38 KMango

KMango

    Mischieftain

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,174 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 02:48 PM

It feels weird talking about myself here. I'm not sure this log is going to interesting enough to sustain for another 3 weeks. We'll see.

Emma found a recipe in Mollie Katzan's kid cookbook Honest Pretzels for a one-pan vegan chocolate cake that uses cocoa powder and vegetable oil. It tastes pretty good, and it's wonderful to have a dessert option other than sorbet.

Breakfast remains a problem. Surliness gets in the way of creativity, and I wind up either eating nothing (not ideal) or scrounging for leftovers. Need a system...

Sustain it! Sustain it! Not only are the rest of us reading it, but you'll be amazed how often this thread will come up in web searches from folks struggling with their own iodine-free diet solutions. You're building a resource that will be used many more times than you know.

And, regarding breakfast, would a fruit or green smoothie be appealing? I've been up to my antioxidant eyeballs with my blender breakfasts lately, but I know they are not for everyone. If they sound good to you, maybe I can start a thread on Smoothie Secrets and we can see where it goes?

Plus, I wonder how many times that new thread would get web searched, for all kinds of reasons, having nothing to do with food.
-KMango

"Everyone expects me to do certain things. It puts a ceiling on your progress. You’re blocked by your pride. To get good, you have to throw your board around and fall." -Rodney Mullen

#39 leleboo

leleboo

    Queen of Supply-Side Bonhomie Bone-Drab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,523 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 02:59 PM

Sustain it! Sustain it! Not only are the rest of us reading it, but you'll be amazed how often this thread will come up in web searches from folks struggling with their own iodine-free diet solutions. You're building a resource that will be used many more times than you know.

This is a great point -- our thread titles are truly beloved by Google and Bing. Not that you need to do this out of purely altruistic motivation, but do know that other people are finding help here.

And, regarding breakfast, would a fruit or green smoothie be appealing?

Particularly ones that could be made the night before and be ready to go in the a.m.?

"He had found a Nutri-Matic machine which had provided him with a plastic cup filled with a liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea." ~THHGTTG
"Are you from the future? Do they still have sandwiches there?" ~Montgomery Scott, Star Trek
------
Leigh


#40 mame11

mame11

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 04:12 PM

Is oatmeal verboten? If not, I love starting the day with oatmeal. I add whatever fruit I have in the house, often "roasting" apples and pears. Sometimes I buy frozen berries and toss them in. It's a good and hearty breakfast.

Also, banana with your homemade peanut butter would stick to the ribs.

#41 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 04:53 PM

Oatmeal is allowed, but I don't really like it that much. I should just suck it up and eat it for three weeks. :lol:

KMango, smoothies sound like a good idea as long as they limit dairy & soy.

#42 saf

saf

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 05:51 PM

It feels weird talking about myself here. I'm not sure this log is going to interesting enough to sustain for another 3 weeks. We'll see.]]

I find it fascinating. Having been through this in the past, and being quite certain that it is in my future, I am very interested to see someone else's experience, and steal your (much better than my) ideas.

As for breakfast - Angel food cake with fruit?

Sarah In Petworth


#43 laniloa

laniloa

    grunt

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 793 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 06:54 PM

Sustain it. I'm on a low fat, low acid, bland diet until my gallbladder comes out on the 5th. While my restrictions are completely different than yours, I appreciate the company.

#44 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 07:10 PM

Sustain it. I'm on a low fat, low acid, bland diet until my gallbladder comes out on the 5th. While my restrictions are completely different than yours, I appreciate the company.

Oh, ugh! I am so sorry to hear that. I've had several friends in the same boat. :lol:

I came home this evening with no energy for cooking, so dinner was steamed basmati rice, grilled pork chops brushed with honey mustard (Whole Foods sells a no-salt dijon), and steamed asparagus. I did get ingredients though, so will do the Indian recipes tomorrow night.

#45 laniloa

laniloa

    grunt

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 793 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 09:33 PM

It is some pretty boring eating and, if my gallstone attack hadn't been so brutal, no doubt I would have fallen off the wagon by now. Nothing like searing pain to keep you on track. Setting the surgery date also helped -- open-ended boring eating was not working for me. The good news is that life will gradually get back to some semblance of normal. Multi-day high fat revelries will be out but that is probably good for multiple reasons. Plus, I'll be back to eating acidic foods in time for tomato season.

Are you having to prep separate meals for yourself or has the family jumped on the low-iodine bandwagon?

#46 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 10:06 PM

It is some pretty boring eating and, if my gallstone attack hadn't been so brutal, no doubt I would have fallen off the wagon by now. Nothing like searing pain to keep you on track. Setting the surgery date also helped -- open-ended boring eating was not working for me. The good news is that life will gradually get back to some semblance of normal. Multi-day high fat revelries will be out but that is probably good for multiple reasons. Plus, I'll be back to eating acidic foods in time for tomato season.

Are you having to prep separate meals for yourself or has the family jumped on the low-iodine bandwagon?

Having an end date helps a lot.

The only meal my diet affects is dinner, and I usually modify my meal to fit the diet, like skip the bread & butter, or fix myself something separate. Luckily at this time of year we eat a lot of grilled stuff and salads, so it's not as inconvenient as it could be.

#47 mame11

mame11

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts

Posted 18 April 2010 - 10:43 PM

Oatmeal is allowed, but I don't really like it that much. I should just suck it up and eat it for three weeks. :lol:

KMango, smoothies sound like a good idea as long as they limit dairy & soy.

I used to not like it either until I was sick in February and decided that if I would eat oatmeal in the morning it would give me enough energy if I wasn't able to eat the rest of the day. I literally had to suck it up but am now glad I did... try it. I like the WF organic quick oats.

Also, I went on a low salt diet and boy was it hard. I found using celery and apples as crackers was great. But I wasn't going totally salt free so I still had cheese and turkey on the "crackers."

#48 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,771 posts

Posted 19 April 2010 - 09:56 AM

I've learned to love oatmeal--I use Bob's Red Mill steel cut oats and cook them in a mixture of coconut milk and water, with vanilla bean, cinnamon stick, chopped ripe banana (if I have one in the house), golden raisins (or other dried fruit), ginger, cardamom and nutmeg. J likes it with some cream and brown sugar. I use skim milk and maple syrup. But it could be eaten with almond or rice milk, if dairy is out, and is even good without any additional sweetener. Even my die-hard, oatmeal-hating daughter loves this, and asks me to make it whenever she is at home.

It is definitely not quick-cook, but so worth it--like dessert for breakfast. Cook's Illustrated did a comparative tasting of various oatmeals, and Bob's steel cut was the runaway winner in the steel-cut category, and their thick-cut rolled oats were the favorite of all of the brands of rolled oats they tasted.

#49 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 19 April 2010 - 11:08 AM

I've learned to love oatmeal--I use Bob's Red Mill steel cut oats and cook them in a mixture of coconut milk and water, with vanilla bean, cinnamon stick, chopped ripe banana (if I have one in the house), golden raisins (or other dried fruit), ginger, cardamom and nutmeg. J likes it with some cream and brown sugar. I use skim milk and maple syrup. But it could be eaten with almond or rice milk, if dairy is out, and is even good without any additional sweetener. Even my die-hard, oatmeal-hating daughter loves this, and asks me to make it whenever she is at home.

It is definitely not quick-cook, but so worth it--like dessert for breakfast. Cook's Illustrated did a comparative tasting of various oatmeals, and Bob's steel cut was the runaway winner in the steel-cut category, and their thick-cut rolled oats were the favorite of all of the brands of rolled oats they tasted.

No one in my house likes steel-cut oats, so I buy the rolled oats. Most instant oatmeal contains salt, even the plain varieties, so I go with long cooking. Dried fruit is on most forbidden lists, which is a huge bummer. Almond & rice milk have added sea salt, so I can't use them. I should check on coconut milk. Maple syrup, nuts, spices & jam are fine though.

Nancy, low salt is tough. I can have salt as long as it isn't iodized, and since most processed foods don't specify it's safer to avoid them. Plain salt is available at most groceries, & kosher salt is fine for me.

#50 Heather

Heather

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,792 posts

Posted 19 April 2010 - 05:25 PM

For a super-fast enchilada sauce, roast an onion, some garlic, tomatillos and green chile (either a poblano or a couple or three jalapeños) in a hot oven until softened and blackened. Peel the chiles and throw everything in the blender with a small slug of cider vinegar, a handful of cilantro and a little water or chicken stock and some kosher salt. Blend until smooth. You can use it just like that, or what I do is then simmer it on the stovetop for about 15 minutes so all the flavors have a chance to blend.

I did this tonight with a poblano. Once everything was softened/blackened, I scraped it into the food processor for a few turns, then into a saucepan. I added quite a bit of water since I knew the corn tortillas would soak it up, and about a teaspoon of sugar because it was very tart. Once it had simmered for a few minutes I made the casserole:

1/3 sauce
a layer of corn tortillas* torn to fit a 9x13 pyrex dish
1/2 the "filling" (shredded chicken, unsalted black beans, diced sauteed zucchini & onion, cumin, kosher salt, pepper, & a hit of cinnamon)
another layer of tortillas
1/3 sauce
the rest of the chicken mixture
another layer of tortillas
the rest of the sauce.

I baked it covered with foil for 30 minutes, and served it topped with chopped cilantro, minced onion, a dot of El Yucateco habanero sauce, and a squeeze of lime. My doctor is allowing me a small amount of dairy every day, so I used part of it as a small dollop of sour cream. I would make this even if I wasn't on this diet. Thinly sliced radishes would have been good, so would using shredded pork instead of chicken in the filling. I'll probably use a jalapeno in the sauce next time for a little more heat.


*Whole Foods brand yellow corn tortillas, which contain nothing but corn and lime.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users