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Ethiopic, Samuel Ergete and Meseret Bekele's Charming Ethiopian on 4th and H Streets in the Atlas District

H Street Corridor Atlas District Ethiopian Samuel Ergete Meseret Bekele

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#1 ppsailor01

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 09:01 AM

From Frozen Tropics: Soft Opening tonight from 5pm-10pm
Send reservation requests to: info@ethiopicrestaurant.com
http://www.ethiopicrestaurant.com/

Very excited for this new Ethiopian place.



#2 youngfood

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 07:48 PM

Any recent experiences worth sharing? 7 of us are going to hit an Ethiopian place for dinner this Friday night, either on 9th or U. I've always been happy with Dukem but my last meal there was a little dull. Besides Etete, what else is fresh and good in the area?

There's a new spot called Ethiopic that just opened at 401 H Street NE. My vegetarian sampler there on our first visit was very good. Yelp reviews are favorable thus far. Having met the owners who live nearby, I'm confident in saying the reviews aren't because they've been extrorted by Yelp. The restaurant is small and the staff is still getting up to speed, but the food is good and I don't think there's any other competition for them this side of 9th and U.

#3 youngfood

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 09:10 AM

Tom Sietsema does his First Bite on this place today. It's a nice piece on a nice spot with very solid Ethiopian food.

Has anyone else been yet? We have been meaning to make another visit for a while. It's a small spot, so if Tom's piece drives up traffic and you have to wait for a table, stop by Toyland (421 H St) for a drink beforehand. Tom likes that place too -- called it his favorite new bar recently.

#4 New Foodie

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 12:08 PM

The starting of this thread got me interested, so the +1 and I headed up the street to Ethiopic last night. It's only a 10-15 min walk from my apartment, which is great to know. It's fairly small with only 12 or so tables in a converted corner row house with a small bar at the back. While we were there there were only 2 other tables seated and only a couple people at the bar (definitely didn't fill up last night due to Tom's First Bite review).

After we ordered we were brought a small serving of what the waitress called "Ethiopian bread" to dip in a small bowl of oil with red chili. This was very good, and I would've eaten more if she hadn't brought only 5 small bites! For our entrees we split the Vegetarian Sampler for one ($18) that included GOMEN (Collard green cooked with spices and herbs), MISER WOT (Pureed split red lentils simmered with red pepper sauce), KIK ALETCHA (Yellow split peas simmered in a mild sauce) and DINICH WOT (Curried potato simmered with onions, garlic, jalapeno peppers, olive oil, fresh herbs & spices) with a small salad of tomato, onion and jalapeno in the center, all served on injera. I think the red lentils were our favorite, but everything was really good. The +1 doesn't even really like collard greens, but loved these. Be aware of the slices of fresh jalapeno in the center salad cause they are hot!

We also split SEGA KEY WOT (Prime beef sautéed in butter, and simmered in hot sauce seasoned with spices. - $16), which, while good, was not really that spicy at all (despite the indication on the menu). The sauce was great for dipping leftover injera. Both entrees were very good serving sizes and we left stuffed. We probably could've fed a third person for as much as we put away.

I'd only had Ethiopian one other time, maybe 6+ years ago, and remember not liking it, mostly because I didn't like the injera. I'm so glad I've given it another shot (tastes change after all!) and am now an Ethiopian convert. We both agreed the prices seemed a bit high compared to what's available at other places, but all in all it's a good addition to the neighborhood, and I'll be heading back at some point.

-Jenny

"Vegetables are a must on a diet. I suggest carrot cake, zucchini bread, and pumpkin pie. ~Jim Davis, Garfield"


#5 ppsailor01

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 03:11 PM

We hit up this joint on Friday night. Every table was take and there seems to be a buzz about this place right now. The space looks sharp and is different from any other Ethiopean place I have been to in the city. It is hard to explain but it seems more upscale than Dukem and Etete. We got the Signature Lamb Tibs and the vegetarian sampler. Both were exceptional. The Lamb Tibs actually comes in a small pot that has a candle under it keeping it warm as you progress through the meal. Dittos to a previous poster about the collard green, I usually am not a fan but these were fantastic. Their service still has some kinks, it took awhile to get our check ,but my first impression of this place was very good!

#6 Rosie

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 01:02 PM

We were also there on Friday night. I think it's a great addition to the H Street dining scene and agree that the food is on par with, if not better than, Dukem and other spots around the city. But they definitely still need to work out a few kinks.

The four of us shared a Vegetarian Sampler for 2 and Beef & Chicken Sampler. All of the vegetarian choices got rave reviews with the standout being the remarkably tender collard greens. The meat sampler was also tasty, although I thought the flavors weren't quite as interesting as those in the non-meat dishes. In particular, the Dora Key Wot and Sega Key Wot lacked the spice advertised in the menu description.

I agree that service is a a problem here, although they were quite busy on Friday. We had to flag people down for water and bread refills and we were never given napkins (which made eating the bone-in items on the meat platter especially messy). Also, despite repeated inquiries, our wine order didn't show up until we were nearly finished with our dinner.

#7 susanmab

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 09:29 AM

I was there for an early dinner last night, and I really liked what I saw. The place is both beautiful and cozy.

I really *really* liked what I ate! I have had a lot of Ethiopian food over the last 20 years (pretty much once or twice a week for a few years there), and this was as better than 90% of it, and definitely as good as any I've had. We ordered the veggie sampler for two, and found that everything was cooked perfectly and appropriately spiced.

All of the vegetarian dishes are vegan: I am going to say that this is likely the reason why each of them had a quality to them distinct from any other Ethiopian food I have had. The flavors of the vegetables came through more. I would never have characterized other veggie dishes as "oily", but by comparison these were far less oily. I have a tendency to eat the injera on the platter towards and then of the meal, and it was noticeably less greasy in the places it had been sitting under the food. The awaze was a little different than I'm used to as well. A little more flavorful, I tasted more spice that wasn't overpowered by the heat.

I was really hoping that this place would be good. These hopes were well exceeded.

I hope to go back with a carnivore friend and try some of the other dishes, but the veggies were so perfect that I'm already wondering when I can go get them again.

#8 youngfood

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Posted 25 May 2010 - 10:02 PM

Todd Kliman recommends Ethiopic in his online chat today as his top spot for Ethiopian, saying that it "is putting out some of the best Ethiopian food right now in the area."

We had their lamb tibs on a recent visit and they were as good as any Ethiopian dish I've ever had.

#9 Tweaked

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 10:02 AM

Had the Veggie Sampler Platter at Ethiopic last night, seven different items (basically all their veg offerings), I'm no expert on ethiopian food but really really enjoyed it.

However, we added the fried fish for an extra $2...way over fried and boney, not even worth the extra $2.

Next time leave the fish, take the veggies.
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#10 Tweaked

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 09:51 AM

Ethiopic gets the Sietsema Treatment - Two Stars
Meat is Murder...Tasty Tasty Murder

#11 giant shrimp

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 10:45 AM

Ethiopic gets the Sietsema Treatment - Two Stars

he liked the croaker least, but plain with lemon is the way i usually find it served, as a supplement to the fasting vegetables. i thought ethiopic's was better, moister than etete's. and most of our vegetables did not benefit from the layering of flavors he mentions in his review. this is a longer bus ride for me than etete, but worth the trip (a 10 minute walk from union station). he is definitely right that the tables are too small.

#12 DaRiv18

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Posted 26 June 2010 - 06:48 PM

A bit sweaty and in my t-shirt, I sat at the bar, intent on quick bite before heading home. Figuring it wouldn't be super huge, I ordered the ETHIOPIC SIGNATURE KITFO ($16) -- the raw beef tartare -- and an ethiopian lager ($6) (which was quite refreshing).

My eyes must have popped out upon the kitfo's arrival. Conservatively, the serving was about 15 ounces of the tartare. Spicy and delicious. A couple of sinews, but wow what a value. It was served with a steamed collard green, a spicy tomato salad, and their house cottage cheese. So much food, that I unilaterally cancelled our family dinner plans and ordered the remainder of the tartar to be boxed up, and got a Veggie sampler ($18) to go. The Wife enjoyed the veggie sampler more, although it didn't seemed as generously portioned as the kitfo. Then again, what could?

"All martinis taste good but do not promote fine distinctions in taste or other areas of intellectual discrimination." Raymond Sokolov, How to Cook


#13 Waitman

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 09:33 PM

Went to Ethiopic tonight.

Not so much.

Daughter got the vegetarian platter. Everything served walk-in cold (including the injera) and underspiced.

Wife got the kitfo. Way too salty.

I got the "signature" shiro. Inedibly salty.

So we mentioned it to the wonderful waitress who said she'd take it off our check. And then the eager and friendly owner (?) must have seen it all go back into the kitchen and came to the table to ask for a do-over. And although we had mentally moved past a disappointing dinner we stupidly said yes and were stuck there waiting for food we really didn't want to get cooked and then tasting it and assuring everyone that it was lovely -- which it may have been but not a go-out-of-your-way lovely -- and eating three bites and having it wrapped and paying for food that will never be eaten. We handled it poorly, but who wants to be dickish to a friendly guy when you're trapped there anyway at least until the check is delivered?

It's not just that it was a mediocre and annoying meal, it's that even if it had been done right the first time I can't figure out how Tom gave it two stars.

As always, YMMV.

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#14 Mrs. B

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 10:27 PM

We handled it poorly, but who wants to be dickish to a friendly guy when you're trapped there anyway at least until the check is delivered?

What's the right way to handle this folks? I was way beyond my capacity/desire to consume more food but I was sure that they wanted to make it all right. Which they really couldn't by the offer of more food at that point. I really didn't care if they removed anything from the check I just felt they should know that we thought the dishes over salted (not over spiced). My taste buds were already shot, my desire to leave great. Do you decline honest hospitality and risk looking like the (fill in the blank) or do you accept it and risk looking like the (fill in the blank)when you can't eat what is set before you?

Ethoipic is a beautiful space, the chickpea salad is wonderful and refreshing I enjoyed the vegetable platter (my daughter prefers a different temp)and the service was great. The replacement shiro will be re-evaluated tomorrow when my saline addled buds have had a chance to recover.

My first reaction though, on tasting the replacement shiro is that this is something I could not only grow to love but to crave.

I still think the mitmita is too salty. Though I wouldn't mind having it rim the glass of a bloody mary one day.

#15 DaRiv18

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 10:52 AM

it's that even if it had been done right the first time I can't figure out how Tom gave it two stars.

I don't understand this part? Are you saying the chef's style is doomed from the start?

"All martinis taste good but do not promote fine distinctions in taste or other areas of intellectual discrimination." Raymond Sokolov, How to Cook


#16 Pat

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 12:23 PM

What's the right way to handle this folks? I was way beyond my capacity/desire to consume more food but I was sure that they wanted to make it all right. Which they really couldn't by the offer of more food at that point. I really didn't care if they removed anything from the check I just felt they should know that we thought the dishes over salted (not over spiced). My taste buds were already shot, my desire to leave great. Do you decline honest hospitality and risk looking like the (fill in the blank) or do you accept it and risk looking like the (fill in the blank)when you can't eat what is set before you?

I haven't had that happen with an entire meal, but I've declined having food remade or extras brought out by saying that I was too full to eat anything more. I suppose the ethos of the particular restaurant would make a difference, though, and it might have been considered rude to leave there without taking more food as opposed to, say, at Clyde's. The hospitality component would be different at the two places.

The only other options I can think of are to plead an imminent engagement elsewhere that means you can't stay and/or to say something about trying the dish again next time, which gets you off the hook if you don't intend to go back and gives them the opportunity to remember you and serve it gratis if you do indeed go back..

#17 Waitman

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 10:07 PM

I don't understand this part? Are you saying the chef's style is doomed from the start?

Saying that even when it wasn't over-salted, nothing that we ate last night -- with the possible exception of the chickpea salad -- was particularly memorable. Nice space, lovely staff. Meh food.

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#18 Ericandblueboy

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 10:42 PM

Saying that even when it wasn't over-salted, nothing that we ate last night -- with the possible exception of the chickpea salad -- was particularly memorable. Nice space, lovely staff. Meh food.

Are there any Ethiopian restaurants in the area worth 2 stars? Is Ethiopian food worth 2 stars? I don't dislike Ethiopian food (there're few things that I won't eat) but I've never been wowed by it either. Definitely never craved Ethiopian food. If anything, I feel obligated to eat Ethiopian food every once in awhile just to refresh my memory as to why I don't like it.

#19 goodeats

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 11:24 PM

Are there any Ethiopian restaurants in the area worth 2 stars? Is Ethiopian food worth 2 stars? I don't dislike Ethiopian food (there're few things that I won't eat) but I've never been wowed by it either. Definitely never craved Ethiopian food. If anything, I feel obligated to eat Ethiopian food every once in awhile just to refresh my memory as to why I don't like it.

Sorry to go off-topic, having not dined at Ethiopic, but to answer your question, yes, but only if it is your thing. If it is done well, Ethiopian can be wowing in a comfort food sort of way. It will never be the 4 star or Michelin restaurants you are accustomed to, but yes.
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#20 Mrs. B

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 11:35 PM

Are there any Ethiopian restaurants in the area worth 2 stars? Is Ethiopian food worth 2 stars? I don't dislike Ethiopian food (there're few things that I won't eat) but I've never been wowed by it either. Definitely never craved Ethiopian food. If anything, I feel obligated to eat Ethiopian food every once in awhile just to refresh my memory as to why I don't like it.

Well there's the possibility of judging by the method used by the Westminster Kennel Club.
Best in class, best in show. It still comes down to an individual judges preference and well "judgement" when confronted with the best of the best that are not all apples.
For what it's worth I believe that kitfo is my biggest food craving ever, if I don't get a fix at least once a month I'm a very sad camper.
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#21 susanmab

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 07:09 AM

For what it's worth I believe that kitfo is my biggest food craving ever, if I don't get a fix at least once a month I'm a very sad camper.

Mine is mesir wat. I can not even begin to tally the number of places I have eaten mesir wat over the years (20+, going back to heading to Meskerem in high school because we could order Tej and not get carded). The version I've had at Ethiopic is definitely amongst those that have been the most to my liking.

I'm bummed that Waitman had meh food - the description doesn't match any of the (only a few) meals I've enjoyed there, and if it's one thing that I think really does any restaurant a disservice it's inconsistency.

#22 Tweaked

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 09:20 AM

Another good outing at Ethiopic over the weekend.

The veggie sampler was once again tasty, the chicken and beef sampler was decent (it lacks variety, you get two types of doro wat and two beef dishes), also sampled one of the lamb dishes which was good (not sure which one since we had a large group and it was ordered on the far side of the table, but if I was to order a meat dish I would go lamb.)

Beer wise I like the stout off the ethiopian beer list, it's more of a dark amber than say a British style stout.
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#23 Pat

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 08:35 AM


Another good outing at Ethiopic over the weekend.

The veggie sampler was once again tasty, the chicken and beef sampler was decent (it lacks variety, you get two types of doro wat and two beef dishes), also sampled one of the lamb dishes which was good (not sure which one since we had a large group and it was ordered on the far side of the table, but if I was to order a meat dish I would go lamb.)

Beer wise I like the stout off the ethiopian beer list, it's more of a dark amber than say a British style stout.

A friend and I ate here last night, splitting the vegetarian sampler for one (which was more than enough for two) and adding a lamb dish, yebeg aletcha wot. I enjoyed the lamb but it was more a mince than the chunks of meat I thought it would be. The vegetarian sampler was quite satisfying--I especially loved the split peas (kik aletcha)--but the real highlight of the meal was our appetizer. We ordered a bowl of the butcha, which is described as "Chilled chickpeas purée seasoned with red onions, garlic, jalapeno pepper, olive oil, lemon juice & spices." We both simultaneously remarked that it was "fresh" (me) and "refreshing" (her). It had clean, bright flavors, a little hot but not too sharp. I would absolutely recommend this. There was a lot of it (more than there was bread for it) and we held it over to add to our sampler platter when that came out.

Thanks for the stout recommendation. I doubt I would have gone for it otherwise.

It's great to have an Ethiopian restaurant that doesn't require a trip to Northwest, and I hope the mess of a construction zone that H Street is doesn't keep people away.

#24 Tweaked

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 02:53 PM

Ethiopic was FULL saturday night around 9pm. The restaurant is fairly small and with 3 large groups hogging tables seating was even more limited! Waited about 30 minutes before we cobbled together some chairs and a couple low basket tables (I'm sure those wicker tables have a real name :) ).

Tried the Signature Lamb Tips for the first time...not sure if the chef was in a bad mood or just likes to torture people, but the dish was blistering hot with jalapenos...delicious but spicy!
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#25 leleboo

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 02:56 PM

low basket tables (I'm sure those wicker tables have a real name :) ).

Mesob.

(Addis Red Sea in Boston's South End used to have a sign on each one: "Hello! I'm a Mesob!")

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#26 youngfood

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 10:15 AM

Bumpity - what is the best place to go these days? Have a hankerin' for doro wat but don't know where in DC!

Todd and Tom both speak highly of Ethiopic on H Street. I'm a fan as well though I haven't been to any of the other contenders lately.

#27 The Doctor

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 10:58 AM

Todd and Tom both speak highly of Ethiopic on H Street. I'm a fan as well though I haven't been to any of the other contenders lately.

Ethiopic is popular, too. I went at 7:30 this past Sunday and they gave us an estimated hour wait time.

#28 dcandohio

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 10:13 AM

Couldn't find a topic on Ethiopic. I'm no expert, and I was underwhelmed by my visit to Etete a few years ago so I haven't ventured back to Ethiopian food since then. We almost didn't go in Sunday evening because the place looked boarded up, but apparently they are doing construction which will create outdoor space. It's a small, plain space, with super-friendly staff. We started with the bouticha - mashed chick peas with lots of jalapeno, onion, lemon, spices...it was delicious. Very filling. Then we shared the signature shiro and Awaze tibs. The tibs were very spicy, with better quality beef than I remembered from Etete. The shiro was milder, but still plenty flavorful. I don't know if this is authentic, but I liked it very much. +1, who is not fond of injera (and therefore never encourages experimentation with Ethiopian) said she liked Ethiopic's version well enough to agree to return.

I hope that all the places on H street hang in through the rest of the construction. There's so much to like on H Street.

Curious to hear from those of you who know the cuisine better than I do. How do you rate it relative to the other choices in DC?

Shut up and pour another glass of wine, please.


#29 Pat

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 05:23 PM

Recently had a belated birthday dinner here with friends. We started with the buticha.
Chilled chickpeas purée seasoned with red onions, garlic, jalapeno pepper, olive oil, lemon juice & spices.
Almost as good as I remember but not quite.

We asked for advice as to another starter and our server steered us to the excellent KEY SIR
Cooked beets and potato seasoned with vegetable oil, carrots, onions, and jalapeño pepper.
I was wary of this and it blew me away. It may have been my favorite dish of the night.

Someone else did the ordering, so I'm not 100% sure of everything else we got, though we got the Vegetarian Sampler at my insistence, and it was fantastic. I can't claim to have ordered everything here, but, really, order this.

I know we had the DORO KEY WOT
Tender chicken legs with hard-boiled egg sauteed in seasoned butter and simmered in spicy red pepper sauce. Nice moist, tender chicken, falling off the bone.

I think we had two tibs dishes, one lamb, which I didn't try though I love lamb (I was full at that point) and one, I believe, with beef that had a berbere sauce that was too strong. It wasn't that it was too hot; it was more like eating raw chili powder. That was the only thing I tried that was lacking.

They also brought a lovely birthday plate with their Honey-Nut-Baklava, which is not something that I expect in an Ethiopian restaurant. I enjoyed it but it was very sweet from the honey.

Before I wanted to go back for the buticha; now I want to go back for the beets!

Really excellent service too.

#30 Tujague

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 05:15 PM

Every time I go past Ethiopic and look inside, I want to eat there, simply because the room is just so darned attractive--and, with the front facade being reworked to match the 4th Street windows, it's that much more good looking. Having won a Bloomspot coupon from Don a few weeks ago (thanks!), Bob and I no longer had no excuse to go, and we were indeed treated to a lovely evening. The only downside to the lovely room is that it is a fairly noisy space--even though the tables are well spaced, the acoustics are such that few conversations are confidential. But compared to some places where the din makes it hard to hear even oneself, this was more just a distraction than a real problem.

The staff here is charming, and we followed the advice of other reviewers and shared the Key Sir (beet/potato salad)--just as excellent as everyone has said and maybe our best dish--and the seven-dish vegetarian sampler. The latter is a huge amount of food, easily enough for at least three, and we were quite sated by the time we left. (Of course, injera has a way of being very filling, even though Ethiopic's version is one of the lightest I have ever encountered.) I don't eat Ethiopian food very often, so I am no expert and can't make many comparison, but this was certainly as good as I've had, though not perfect. For instance, the Shimbra Asa Wot (chickpea fritters) were a real letdown--dry and uninteresting, even with the spicy sauce. Timatim (tomatoes and jalapeno salad) was rather ordinary but tasty; the tomatoes were not at their summer peak, but at least were not insipid either. Dinich Wot (curried potatoes) was boring.

My favorites were the Miser Wot (spicy lentils) which had a pleasant, not jarring heat; the Kik Aletcha (yellow split peas), simple but satisfying; and Tikile Gomen (cabbage and potatoes), which was like Oktoberfest comes to Africa. The Gomen (collard greens) was good but could use a bit more spice, while the spicing of the Fosolia (green beans) was a bit too uneven, with jarring hot spots--both could have been the standouts with a bit more care. My Hakim stout was an outstanding accompaniment to the meal and Bob had a great Ethiopian lager (I forget the name). Overall, a fine meal; it's great not only to have an Ethiopian restaurant in this part of town at last, but more, one that maintains a fine standard in terms of cuisine and style.

"There's no need to get snippy. I'm just doing my job here."--Marge Gunderson, Fargo


#31 DonRocks

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 07:47 PM


My favorites were the Miser Wot (spicy lentils)

 

This dish is cheap, right?


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#32 dcandohio

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 08:43 PM

Service fail today. One server for the entire restaurant and the mechanism for processing credit cards failed. The food was good (one dish was cold, and when we pointed it out to the server, she whisked it away, only to bring it back 15 minutes later, still cold. She said the kitchen made a new batch...I doubt it...I think they simply returned the same dish to us). It took us 1/2 hour to process the credit card and pay, People were seated for 15/20 minutes without even getting menus. The person who seemed to be in charge pretty much bailed, doing nothing more than seating people and pouring water. The bartender walked out for a while with his phone. It was a really poor showing. I have liked this place on previous visits, but today was a disaster.

Shut up and pour another glass of wine, please.


#33 DonRocks

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 10:20 AM

And, lets face it, the only reason people go to Etete is that it's the closest thing to a standard American restaurant in decor and service in Little Ethiopia -- the food there hasn't been exciting for a while, but your Aunt from Cincinnati won't be put off by random service strategies, suspect (to her eyes) sanitation, or a too-fiery wat. 

 

Glad you qualified that with Little Ethiopia because Ethiopic is, and always has been, the most gentrified Ethiopian restaurant in DC. Do they still serve the basket of dinner rolls before your meal?


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#34 JoshNE

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 11:28 AM

Glad you qualified that with Little Ethiopia because Ethiopic is, and always has been, the most gentrified Ethiopian restaurant in DC. Do they still serve the basket of dinner rolls before your meal?

 

They haven't served dinner rolls since I've been (frequently) dining there, which would be about 2 years.  They do serve a basket with a few pieces of a dense brown bread that is served with a spiced oil...quite nice actually.



#35 The Doctor

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 11:51 AM

This is a picture I took of the bread and oil served before my meal on May 29, 2011.

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#36 Tweaked

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 09:39 PM

Don, have you considered that the bread rolls served at ethiopic might be a type of dabo - ethiopian honey bread?
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#37 DonRocks

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 10:04 PM

Don, have you considered that the bread rolls served at ethiopic might be a type of dabo - ethiopian honey bread?

 

I'm considering it now. I haven't been in so long that I honestly don't remember if they were this bread, or dinner rolls, so ...expunge my comment from the mental record, please. I'd be happy to delete it, but there have been a few replies, so things wouldn't make any sense if I did.

 

This is exactly why I need to review every single meal, but I just haven't been able to find the energy - writing - writing well - is exhausting to me. Nevertheless, there would be a written record of what I was served, and it would have been an exact description; now, I'm just not sure. I do remember that the service was friendly and wonderful.


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#38 SeanMike

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 11:16 PM

I'm considering it now. I haven't been in so long that I honestly don't remember if they were this bread, or dinner rolls, so ...expunge my comment from the mental record, please. I'd be happy to delete it, but there have been a few replies, so things wouldn't make any sense if I did.

 

This is exactly why I need to review every single meal, but I just haven't been able to find the energy - writing - writing well - is exhausting to me. Nevertheless, there would be a written record of what I was served, and it would have been an exact description; now, I'm just not sure. I do remember that the service was friendly and wonderful.

 

I hate saying this, but it's true for me.

 

Take pictures.

 

I HATE HATE HATE HATE HATE ( x 10,000,000 times) being that person.

 

But I realized on my tour of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail that taking pictures of things is even better than taking notes. The two combined: priceless.

 

They don't have to be portrait quality, or even "I'm going to show them to others" - hell, some of my worst ones helped more than others - but they helped SO MUCH.

 

If anything, it'll give you something to compare what you saw on the last visit to what you see on the next. Did they change the bread?


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#39 Tweaked

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 06:39 AM

I bring it up because everytime i have been to ethiopic the bread basket has contained bread as seen in The Doctor's photo above. Don, the first time i went, I too thought it was odd that they were serving a bread basket. But a month or so back i was flipping through a cookbook and saw a recipe for ethiopian honeybread and it clicked that maybe that is what Ethiopic is serving.
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#40 youngfood

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 09:32 AM

This is a picture I took of the bread and oil served before my meal on May 29, 2011.


This is the same bread they've served since day one.  You can taste the honey in it, so I suspect the suggestion that it is Dabo/Ethiopian honey bread is correct.





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