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#51 Pool Boy

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Posted 07 July 2006 - 10:18 AM

My wife is a cookie baker extraordinaire, but this thread seems like a great resource for more recipes. Thanks for that.

She generally starts experiments after making a batch per the given recipe and then tweaks with it until it becomes the cookies she wants. This seems to work really well. Why? Well, after three increasingly competitive years of local fair baking, she's gotten some experience. Not to meantion a 'Best in Show' in 2003 from the Prince George's County Fair, and couple of first place awards in 2004 in the Howard County Fair, and the Best In Show Special Award in the 2005 Maryland State Fair.

It's good to be me. I get to 'test' all of the recipes, too, natch. :unsure:

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#52 Anna Blume

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Posted 07 July 2006 - 06:42 PM

I happened to glance at the latest Gourmet Magazine at the drugstore yesterday. It's their annual cookie issue, and may have some recipes of interest to holiday cookie bakers out there. According to Ruth Reichl's remarks, they've been testing the recipes all year. I certainly trust her discriminating palate. I don't think she would allow anything but winning recipes to go out there on her watch.

Did anyone make the time-consuming Perfect, Pure browned-butter cookie, recipe accompanied by a vivid, Job-like description of all the effort that goes into them? Curious.

#53 Pool Boy

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 10:44 AM

I would like to recommend browsing throught this web site, Part II of a Cookie Swap collaboration on Il Forno, especially the cardamom pistachio chocolate dipped cookies :unsure: ; a fresh bottle of cardamom really made the cookies addictive.

That link is GOLD. So much to take in and check out. Many thanks!

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#54 cheezepowder

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 08:56 PM

I made two versions of coconut oatmeal toffee cookies today. I found the first recipe here (an adaptation of a recipe from Maida Heatter's New Book of Great Desserts), plus I added Heath toffee chips. There's less oatmeal in this cookie than a "typical" oatmeal cookie, and the cookie is chewy, with the chew more from the coconut and cookie dough than the oatmeal.

The second recipe is Hershey's Oatmeal Toffee Cookie recipe (with the addition of the optional coconut) that was on the back of my bag of Heath toffee chips and is also available here. This recipe has more oatmeal than the first recipe, and the cookie is chewy with a hearty oatmeal texture and appearance. It was interesting to do a side by side comparison of the two cookies, though I liked both versions. My husband preferred the second (Hershey's) recipe.

#55 cheezepowder

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 12:31 PM

Anyone baking holiday cookies? What are you baking?

#56 mktye

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 05:38 PM

We totally goofed and missed a friend's retirement party, so I recently baked up a batch of these to try to make amends:

Cucidati
(Sicilian Fig-Filled Cookies)
Makes ~60 cookies

Dough:
4 cups all-purpose flour
2/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
16 tablespoons (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
4 large eggs

Fig Filling:
12 ounces (about 2 cups) dried Calimyrna figs
cup raisins
1/3 cup candied orange peel, diced
1/3 cup whole almonds, chopped and lightly toasted
3 ounces semisweet chocolate, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1/3 cup apricot preserves
3 tablespoons dark rum
1 teaspoon instant espresso coffee granules
teaspoon ground cinnamon
teaspoon ground cloves

Egg wash:
1 large egg, well beaten with 1 pinch salt

For the dough, in the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Pulse two or three times to mix. Add the butter and pulse repeatedly until finely incorporated and the mixture is cool and powdery. Add the eggs and continue to pulse until the dough forms a ball. Scrape the dough onto a piece of plastic wrap. Press the dough into a square about an inch thick and wrap it tightly. Chill the dough while preparing the filling.

For the filling, in a large bowl, stem and dice the figs. If they are hard, place them in a saucepan, cover with water, and bring to a boil. Drain the figs in a strainer and allow them to cool before proceeding.

Combine the diced figs with the rest of the filling ingredients in the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade and pulse to grind the filling mixture finely.

Take the dough out of the refrigerator, unwrap it, and place it on a floured surface. Knead the dough lightly to make it malleable again and roll into a cylinder. Cut the cylinder into twelve equal pieces. One at a time, on a floured surface, flatten each and make it into a rectangle 3 wide and 12 long. Paint the egg wash on the dough and evenly distribute 1/3 cup filling down its length. Bring the edges of dough up around the filling to enclose it and press the edges of the dough together firmly to seal in the filling. Use your palms to roll over the filled cylinder of dough until it extends to 15 and cut it into five 3 lengths. Set the filled cylinders aside while filling, rolling, and cutting the other pieces of dough.

To finish shaping the cookies, use the point of a sharp knife to make a 1 long cut in the middle of each end and pull the cut sides apart to make the cookie an X. Place each formed cookie on a parchment-lined sheet pan, leaving ~1 all around between the cookies.

After all the cucidati are formed and placed on the pans, paint the outsides lightly with the egg wash. Bake the cookies in a preheated 350 degree oven for about 20 minutes, or until they are a light golden color. Slide the cookies still on the parchpaper from the pans to racks to cool.

Store the cooled cookies between sheets of parchment or wax paper in a tin or plastic container with a tight-fitting cover. They keep nearly indefinitely.

From Cookies Unlimited by Nick Malgieri
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#57 Xochitl10

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 10:57 AM

Anyone baking holiday cookies? What are you baking?

Haven't started baking, but I've certainly started obsessing. Right now, I'm leaning toward gingerbread men, spritz, Mom Davis's biscochitos, and the Seven-Layer Cookies from last year's Gourmet cookie issue.

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#58 porcupine

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 06:38 PM

Mom Davis's biscochitos,

Would you please post the recipe? I love biscochitos.

Elizabeth Miller
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#59 cheezepowder

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 10:02 PM

I'm obsessing about Christmas cookies too. I'm in the midst of researching and testing recipes to decide what to make for a cookie exchange and for homemade treats gift bags for friends and family. I've looked at this month's Gourmet cookie recipies but I haven't tried any of those yet.

For gingerbread cut-out cookies, I tried the recipe for Light Spiced Cookies from the King Arthur Cookie Companion, and due to an uncooperative cookie cutter, I overworked the dough and probably overbaked the cookies too because they came out tough and hard. I didn't like the flavor that much either. So instead, I tried the recipe for Gingerbread People from Rose Levy Beranbaum's book, Rose's Christmas Cookies, and that worked out better for me. If anyone's interested, here's a summary of the recipe:
3 cups flour (dip and sweep) or 15 oz
1/4 teas salt
1 teas baking soda
2 teas ginger
1 teas cinnamon
1/2 teas nutmeg
1/4 teas cloves
3/4 dark brown sugar, packed
12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
1/2 cup unsulfured molasses
1 large egg

Mix the flour, salt, baking soda, and spices in a bowl. In a mixing bowl, cream the butter and brown sugar, then mix in the egg and molasses, then slowly add in the flour/dry ingredients. She says to then scoop the dough into plastic wrap, form it into a disc shape and refrigerate it wrapped for at least 2 hours before rolling out the dough. I prefer to roll out portions of the soft dough to the desired thickness between 2 pieces of parchment paper and then put the dough sheet with the parchment paper still on it in the fridge to chill. She says to roll the dough out to 1/8 inch but if you want a softer chewy cookie, to roll it out to 1/4 inch and underbake it slightly, which is what I did. Cut out cookies and bake in at 350 for 8 to 12 minutes depending on the size of your cookie.

#60 Xochitl10

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Posted 03 December 2006 - 08:34 PM

Would you please post the recipe? I love biscochitos.

Once I've got the mother-in-law's blessing, I'll be happy to. :P

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#61 Xochitl10

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 09:43 AM

As promised, the biscochito recipe. Parentheticals are Mom Davis's. In a follow-up note, she indicated she would be using anisette as at least part of the liquid in her next batch.

6 cups flour
1 cup sugar
2 cups lard (or 1 lb) (I always use shortening)
1 T baking powder
1 t salt
2 eggs
1/2 cup liquid ( may need more or less, go slowly) (I use orange juice or o.j. concentrate, or brandy)
2 T anise seed (crushed) (I usually use more; I like strong anise flavor)
Cinnamon sugar
1 cup sugar
1 T cinnamon

Cream: lard & sugar & anise
Add: eggs - beat well
Combine flour & baking powder
Alternately add flour mix and liquid to cream mixture till stiff dough formed
Roll out dough @ 1/8 inch thick and cut into shapes (you may need to refrigerate the dough for a while). I find that simple shapes work best.
Lightly grease cookie sheets
Bake at 325 to 350 degrees for about 10 minutes or till lightly browned
Dip in cinnamon sugar one at a time while cookie is still warm

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#62 Heather

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 09:59 AM

Anyone baking holiday cookies? What are you baking?

Baking starts Saturday. Pfeffernuesse, lebkuchen, cranberry cheesecake cookies, various spritz (gotta find the cookie press), and two kinds of sugar cookies (cutout with frosting and regular with colored sugar). Plus a white fruitcake.

#63 Pete

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 10:54 AM

Baking starts Saturday. Pfeffernuesse, lebkuchen, cranberry cheesecake cookies, various spritz (gotta find the cookie press), and two kinds of sugar cookies (cutout with frosting and regular with colored sugar). Plus a white fruitcake.

Ooh! Can you post the lebkuchen recipe when you have a chance?

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#64 marigoldsandy

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 04:08 PM

More of a cookie question -- growing up I regularly prepared and consumed no-bake cookies: an oatmeal, peanut butter, cocoa delight. About 50% of the time though the cookies had a grainy texture, like something funny happened to the sugar. Any ideas?

#65 mdt

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 07:25 AM

More of a cookie question -- growing up I regularly prepared and consumed no-bake cookies: an oatmeal, peanut butter, cocoa delight. About 50% of the time though the cookies had a grainy texture, like something funny happened to the sugar. Any ideas?

There was not enough liquid to dissolve the sugar so you were feeling the grains. The heat of baking helps to melt the sugar.

#66 Heather

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 07:45 AM

Lebkuchen

This makes a bar cookie, but if you want individual cookies just adjust the baking time. From Time-Life's The Cooking of Germany. Spicing can be adjusted to taste, and for a spicier cookie add a little ground ginger. I've tried several recipes and always come back to this one. Makes 2-3 dozen depending on the size.

2T butter, softened
2 1/4 C flour, plus 2 T
1/2 t. baking powder
1/2 t ground cloves
1/2 t ground cinnamon
1/4 t ground nutmeg
1 C shelled almonds, ground in a blender or food processor
2 T finely chopped candied orange peel
2 T finely chopped candied lemon peel (or citron)
2 eggs
1/2 C sugar
1 C honey
1/2 C milk (whole)

Butter and flour the bottom and sides of an 11x17 jelly roll pan. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Sift the flour, baking powder, and spices in a large bowl and stir in almonds and candied fruit. Beat the eggs and sugar with an electric mixture until it thickens and forms a ribbon. Beat in honey, then milk, then flour mixture a little at a time. Once it's smooth, spread it in the prepared pan. Bake 12-15 minutes, or until firm to the touch.

Loosen the cake from the pan with a knife and turn out onto a rack. While still warm, brush with almond glaze, let it set for a couple of minutes, then cut the cake into bars 2 1/2 inches long by 1 1/2 inches wide. Cookies will keep 6-8 weeks if stored in a tightly sealed tin.

Almond Glaze

1 C confectioner's sugar
1/2 t almond extract
1 t fresh lemon juice
2 t cold water

#67 smokey

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 10:17 AM

Not sure whether this goes in area grocery stores or here (or both), but I was in the Safeway at Fallsgrove yesterday, and they were having a '2 bags for $4.00' sale on Guittard chips. My PSA for the day.

#68 bookluvingbabe

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 04:03 PM

Last year, two days before Christmas, Mr. BLB announced that he really, really, really wanted to make cookies for the holiday. Further investigation determined that he wanted iced sugar cookies that were cut into cute shapes with cookie cutters. (That was a fun trip to Sur La Table right before the holiday...)

But bake cookies we did and they were good.

Alas, I have no idea what recipe I used or where I found it. I did confirm that he wants to make them again this year. So I'm looking for a good cut-out sugar cookie recipe and a good/easy icing recipe.

Thanks!

Jennifer

#69 Anna Blume

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 10:20 AM

Jennifer: While I've never made them, Gourmet believes fervently in its recipe for simple sugar cookies. Last year's December issue had numerous variations on it, I believe. White, lacy snowflakes... Cf. Epicurious.

* * *
Regarding ingredients, Good News: I just wanted to report that the huge bars of Belgian bittersweet chocolate sold at Trader Joe's for $4 are quite good. I still had a little bit of a more expensive French (name begins "Ca..") brand that WF sells in bars to compare with TJ's. For baking, I don't think there are any real qualitative differences and in fact, TJ gives you a higher percentage of cocoa.

Bad News: WF no longer seems to be ordering Valrhona cocoa to portion out and sell by weight in small containers. It made the splurge more justifiable since you could buy less than a cup to use just for immediate needs. I bought some earlier in the year to make Korova cookies and in this case, the difference was remarkable.

#70 laniloa

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Posted 12 December 2006 - 10:50 PM

Bad News: WF no longer seems to be ordering Valrhona cocoa to portion out and sell by weight in small containers. It made the splurge more justifiable since you could buy less than a cup to use just for immediate needs. I bought some earlier in the year to make Korova cookies and in this case, the difference was remarkable.

My local World Market just started carrying Valrhona cocoa at reasonable prices. Could've knocked me over with a feather when I saw it.

#71 Anna Blume

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Posted 13 December 2006 - 12:33 PM

My local World Market just started carrying Valrhona cocoa at reasonable prices. Could've knocked me over with a feather when I saw it.

Thanks for the tip. I've never gone into these stores, but there are a number to try calling.

#72 Heather

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 07:47 AM

So instead, I tried the recipe for Gingerbread People from Rose Levy Beranbaum's book, Rose's Christmas Cookies, and that worked out better for me.

Cheezepowder, does this make a chewy cookie?

The kids have requested gingerbread people, and I can't find my old recipe. If anyone has a good chewy gingerbread cookie recipe, please post!

#73 cheezepowder

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 09:21 AM

Cheezepowder, does this make a chewy cookie?

The kids have requested gingerbread people, and I can't find my old recipe. If anyone has a good chewy gingerbread cookie recipe, please post!

Yes, the cookies I made using the Rose Levy Bernabaum gingerbread people recipe were chewy. I rolled them on the thicker side of 1/4 to 1/3 inch and underbaked them a bit (the tops of the cookies were dry but they were still soft when I took them out of the oven). I let them cool on the silpat on the cookie sheet and moved them when they'd cooled and firmed up a little. Even after they're cool, they were kind of fragile. I didn't decorate mine because it was just a test batch, but I can see having to be careful when picking them up because if you pick them up by an arm, it might break off, so that's the only caveat. It's possible that if I'd baked them a little longer, they would have still been chewy but sturdier.

#74 bilrus

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 09:35 AM

If anyone has a good chewy gingerbread cookie recipe, please post!

Can't vouch for it, but there was a "soft" gingerbreadman recipe in the Post Food section this week.

I personally am intrigued by the Root Beer and Potato Chip cookies.
Bill Russell

#75 Heather

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 09:36 AM

Thanks for the tip. I'll be baking with an overenthusiastic 4-year-old, so I might tinker with the recipe to try make them less fragile.

Anyone have a good icing recipe?

#76 Anna Blume

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 04:49 PM

I think we always did a simple frosting with confectioner's sugar with a little lemon juice to cut the cloying factor. Here's a good one from the midwest.

My family's recipe. Update first ingredient to comply with current sentiments:

3/4 c melted shortening
1 cup molasses
1 c brown sugar
1 c thick sour milk
6 c sifted flour
1/2 t salt
2 t ginger [could be 1 t ginger; 1/2 cinnamon & 1/2 nutmeg or cloves instead]
4 t bking soda
1 T lemon extract

Mix first 3. (I'd probably cream soft butter with the sugar, though the shortening made the cookies become soft and chewy after a day or so layered in tins despite how crisp they might seem when they first cool.) Add #4, then sifted dry ingredients. Add lemon extract. Mix to stiff dough and chill until quite firm. Roll to 1/3 in. Bake 350 8-10 minutes. I haven't made these for ages, but recall that the last time I did, 6 & 8-year olds had fun frosting them without breakage.

#77 Anna Blume

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 12:05 PM

I believe these came in the mail yesterday. Turns out there are half a dozen recipes for rosemary shortbread on epicurious, but these rosemary pine nut cookies are thin, much lighter and buttery enough. Surprisingly good and addictive.

#78 mdt

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 01:38 PM

Over the holidays I made a double batch of Magic-in-the-Middle cookies from the King Arthur Cookie Cookbook. They are a chocolate/peanut butter cookie with peanut butter filling. The 'magic' is that the filling is hidden inside the outer chocolate cookie. Quite simply they are one of the best, if not the best cookie I have had.

#79 mktye

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 09:58 AM

Over the holidays I made a double batch of Magic-in-the-Middle cookies from the King Arthur Cookie Cookbook. They are a chocolate/peanut butter cookie with peanut butter filling. The 'magic' is that the filling is hidden inside the outer chocolate cookie. Quite simply they are one of the best, if not the best cookie I have had.

They are also excellent made with the Macadamia/Cashew butter found at Trader Joe's. :P
M. K. Tye

#80 giant shrimp

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 03:18 PM

I would like to recommend browsing throught this web site, Part II of a Cookie Swap collaboration on Il Forno, especially the cardamom pistachio chocolate dipped cookies :P ; a fresh bottle of cardamom really made the cookies addictive.

it's not really a cookie, but for those who like fudge, the panuche recipe on this site is the real deal. i use walnuts, and if you use a heavy, enameled creuset pot, you can speed up the cooking time (from 25 minutes) and know that your candy will pass the soft ball test when the bottom starts scorching. i always have a sink of ice water standing by to cool things down quickly at this point and don't beat the candy the full five minutes that is recommended, but the results are still creamy enough.

the best cookie i ran across this christmas: an angel in palena's cookie plate. she was so nice we decided not to eat her.

#81 porcupine

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 04:11 PM

Inspired by the recent Washington Post article on butterscotch, I went searching for a butterscotch cookie recipe that didn't seem as wacky as the one they printed. What I've determined is that you can call a confection 'butterscotch' if 1) it has commercial butterscotch chips :o or 2) if it contains all brown sugar :lol: .

I attempted one recipe that turned out quite nice, if unexciting, but definitely not what I'd call butterscotch flavored. The recipe called for ground nuts, and I didn't have any on hand except almonds, so I just left them out, but I think these would be great with pecans. The cake flour gives them a very soft and crumbly texture. After some fiddling about with oven temperatures and whether to drop or form them, this is what I came up with [with grateful thanks to mktye]:

Brown Butter Cookies

3/4 c brown butter (if you start with one cup butter, by the time it's brown, it'll be reduced to about the right amount).
1 c light brown sugar
1 egg
1 t vanilla
2 1/2 c cake flour
1 t baking powder
1/2 t salt [assuming unsalted butter]

Cool the brown butter, then beat in the brown sugar until no lumps are left. Beat in the egg and vanilla until the mixture is nice and creamy. Sift together the remaining ingredients and beat in to the butter mixture. Chill until firm.

Shape into small balls, place on parchment lined cookie sheets and flatten with the bottom of a glass dipped in sugar. Bake at 350 for about 8 minutes or until very lightly brown on the edges.

-----
I also baked some without flattening - they took about 11 min in a 350 oven, and held their shape well, but I like the flatter ones better.

I might try again tomorrow with AP flour and finely chopped pecans, and will report back.
And I might even try the WP recipe.

In the meantime, does anyone have a recipe for a cookie that actually tastes like butterscotch, without those nasty little candy chips?

Elizabeth Miller
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#82 squidsdc

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 04:44 PM

I'll have to see if I have the recipe handy at home, but from memory your experiment sounds very much like what we used to make when I was growing up---we called them "icebox" or "refrigerator" cookies. Rolled in a log and chilled in the 'fridge, I fondly remember that brown sugar flavor.

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#83 Pat

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 08:28 AM

In the meantime, does anyone have a recipe for a cookie that actually tastes like butterscotch, without those nasty little candy chips?

Years ago, I came up with a butterscotch brownie recipe that was quite good. I haven't made them in a long time and have no idea where my recipe is. If I locate it, I will post it. (I dislike the little candy morsels as well. Chocolate chips is as far as I go with those things.)

#84 lizzie

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 11:28 AM

One of my favorite cookies is the salty oatmeal cookie sold at Teaism - I have tried several random oatmeal cookie recipes but none get me anywhere near the Teaism cookie. Does anyone have a recommendation for a similar salty cookie?

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#85 cheezepowder

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 05:34 PM

One of my favorite cookies is the salty oatmeal cookie sold at Teaism - I have tried several random oatmeal cookie recipes but none get me anywhere near the Teaism cookie. Does anyone have a recommendation for a similar salty cookie?

I haven't tried this recipe, but did you look at this one (click here)? Here's a link to another blog that tried that recipe.

#86 cheezepowder

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 06:01 PM

Lizzie, in case you didn't see the article in the WashPost today on the salty oat cookie and their recipe for salted oatmeal cookies here.

#87 porcupine

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 10:06 AM

Lizzie, in case you didn't see the article in the WashPost today on the salty oat cookie and their recipe for salted oatmeal cookies here.

I made 'em yesterday. Decent oatmeal cookies in their own right, but not really like the Salty Oat cookies at Teaism.

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#88 Al Dente

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 10:24 AM

Someone remind me to get the recipe for my wife's pistachio chocolate chip cookies. Mmmmmmmmmmmm.

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#89 Al Dente

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 12:02 PM

I love these things...

Pistachio Chocolate Chip Cookies

2 cup oatmeal
cup soy milk
cup grapeseed oil
1 teaspoons baking powder
1 Tablespoon honey
cup sugar
pinch of salt
1 cup rough chopped pistachios
cup rough chopped bittersweet chocolate

Mix oatmeal, soy milk, grapeseed oil, baking powder, honey, sugar and salt in a mixer with paddle attachment for 2 full minutes

Add pistachios and chocolate

Drop cookies on baking sheet and flatten with moist fingers

Bake in 350 degree oven until golden brown

Michael Ollinger

 

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Seafood! The Mercedes of food!


#90 cheezepowder

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 05:47 PM

Pistachio Chocolate Chip Cookies

Interesting ingredients. What are these cookies like compared to typical oatmeal chocolate chip cookies? Are they chewy?

#91 Heather

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 07:49 AM

Lizzie, in case you didn't see the article in the WashPost today on the salty oat cookie and their recipe for salted oatmeal cookies here.

I got hooked on Marvelous Market's salty oat cookies fifteen years ago, and haven't been able to duplicate them succesfully. They use currants instead of raisins, and have a less chunky texture than most oatmeal cookies.

#92 zoramargolis

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 02:16 PM

I got hooked on Marvelous Market's salty oat cookies fifteen years ago, and haven't been able to duplicate them succesfully. They use currants instead of raisins, and have a less chunky texture than most oatmeal cookies.

Is it possible that they are made with oat flour, not oatmeal?

#93 Al Dente

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Posted 18 June 2007 - 12:12 PM

Interesting ingredients. What are these cookies like compared to typical oatmeal chocolate chip cookies? Are they chewy?

They're somewhat chewy, though slightly crumbly. If that makes sense. I love pistachios (and chocolate of course), so I dig this recipe a lot.

Michael Ollinger

 

Fox News: We read the chain emails your grandma gets in her inbox out loud like they were true.

 

Seafood! The Mercedes of food!


#94 Pat

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 08:10 AM

Is it possible that they are made with oat flour, not oatmeal?

I'm wondering this too. I had a craving and bought a salty oat cookie at the Eastern Market MM when I went for my morning iced tea. There really aren't that many discernible oats in the cookie. Some of that flavor must be coming from pulverized oats. (It did have currants and visible salt on the top. In searching for this thread, I found Heather's comments somewhere that the last one she bought had raisins and no salt on top.)

#95 porcupine

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 09:33 AM

I am in love with the cookie called "bee stings" at Baked and Wired. They seem to be simple shortbread with a honey and almond topping. Does anyone have a recipe?

Elizabeth Miller
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#96 cheezepowder

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 06:48 PM

I was looking for a way to use my cinnamon chips (bought from King Arthur). To get into the Fall spirit, I made cinnamon chip pumpkin cookies. I used this recipe for soft pumpkin cookies (click), but I didn't want to be stuck with a half can of pumpkin so I doubled the recipe so I could use up the entire can of pumpkin (even though 1 can of pumpkin has a little less than 2 cups of pumpkin (while the doubled recipe would call for 2 cups of pumpkin), it worked out fine just to use 1 can of pumpkin). To the double batch of dough, I added two cups of cinnamon chips. I didn't glaze the cookies as suggested in the recipe. The cookies tasted better than I expected. They had a moist, cakey, springy texture, and they don't spread much while baking. They're really more like tiny cakes or pumpkin bread than your typical crunchy or chewy cookie. The cinnamon chips worked well in the cookie.

#97 porcupine

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 09:44 AM

I am in love with the cookie called "bee stings" at Baked and Wired. They seem to be simple shortbread with a honey and almond topping. Does anyone have a recipe?

I had no luck searching the internets for this one, nor could I find anything quite like it in cookbooks, but after a lot of research came up with the following reasonable facsimile. The shortbread recipe is from Cook's Illustrated ("re-inventing the wheel so you don't have to!") by way of The Amazing mktye, and the topping is adapted from an old Farm Journal publication.

Shortbread Base:
Line an 8" square pan with parchment and heat the oven to 425F.
In a stand mixer with paddle attachment combine
1 3/4 cup all purpose flour
1/4 cup white rice flour
2/3 cup superfine sugar
1/4 t salt

then add 1 cup butter cut into small chunks, and mix on low speed until the dough resembles damp crumbs. Press this firmly and evenly into the pan, place in oven, and reduce oven temperature to 300F. Bake for about 40 min, or until firm to touch but not yet brown. [ed note: I'm still playing around with the baking time here; I've determined that 30 min isn't long enough]

Just before the cookie base is done, bring the following to a full boil:
1/4 cup butter
1/8 cup sugar
1/8 cup honey
1 tablespoon milk
1/2 cup sliced almonds
a dash of salt
some vanilla extract (not too much)

Pour this mixture over the hot cookie base and return to oven for about 25 min, or until the the top is dark golden brown.

Allow these to cool completely before attempting to slice. They are very, very rich, so cut them into very small squares or triangles, or narrow rectangles like Baked and Wired does.

If anyone out there tries this recipe, please get back to me with critiques, as I consider it a work in progress. I'm open to suggestions as to how to tweak it to make it better.

Elizabeth Miller
fast cars, slow food

http://elizaberryblog.wordpress.com/


#98 ohstate

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 01:17 PM

Here is my Hungarian grandmother's recipe for some great soft pillow-like cookies. Since she passed in 84, and didn't really write everything down, especially when it comes to actual amounts, my sister and I fiddled with it a bit to get to this point. She used to bake so many cookies each Christmas. With 9 kids and countless grandchildren and great-grandchildren, she had too!

BUTTER KIFFLA

4 egg yolks
1 cup thick sour cream
1 lb. Butter
1 lemon rind
3 cups flour
Salt (? I use a pinch in her honor, not knowing how much it should really be).

Mix dough; roll into balls the size of a walnut. Chill dough in refrigerator.

When ready to bake, roll out on powdered sugar to about the size of a pancake. (see how vague this is? is 'size'=thickness? because pancake sized seems rather large for a cookie. I go with "thickness". Your mileage may vary.)

Place filling in corner and shape like a crescent.

Bake at 350 about 15 minutes. Sprinkle with powdered sugar when cool.

FILLING:

1/2 lb Ground walnuts
1 1/4 c Sugar
1/4 ts Cinnamon
1 ts Vanilla
3 Egg whites, stiffly beaten

#99 laniloa

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 09:55 PM

Oatmeal double chocolate cherry cookies. Your basic side of the Quaker container recipe with 1/4 cup cocoa subbed for 1/4 cup of flour, a cup of chocolate chunks, and a cup of dried tart cherries. Ends up somewhere between cookie and brownie taste.

#100 mktye

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 08:59 AM

These are rwtye's current favorite take-to-work cookies. Occasionally, I'll run out of pecans and/or dates and substitute walnuts and/or craisins/raisins without receiving any complaints.

Flourless Oatmeal Date Bars
Makes ~2 dozen two-inch squares

1/3 cup olive oil (or vegetable oil or unsalted butter, room temperature)
1 cup brown sugar

2 large eggs
teaspoon salt
teaspoon cinnamon
teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 cups old-fashioned oats (not quick oats)
1 cup diced dates
1 cup nuts (I like to use pecans)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a 9x13-inch baking pan with parchment paper (or grease it well). Beat together the oil and sugar, then add the eggs, salt cinnamon, baking soda and vanilla extract and beat until well mixed. Add the oats, dates and nuts and mix until incorporated.

Press the mixture into the prepared pans and bake for 25-30 minutes or until just starting to brown around the edges. It wont look completely done in the center, but that is okay. If you prefer the cookies to be more crisp, bake an extra 5-10 minutes. Allow to cool in pan before cutting.

Recipe adapted from "The King Arthur Flour Cookies Companion"
M. K. Tye




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