Jump to content


Photo

Kitchen 911

Help!

  • Please log in to reply
565 replies to this topic

#551 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,888 posts

Posted 13 November 2014 - 04:27 PM

You can grind meat in a food processor. cut into chunks and put in the freezer for about 15 minutes, then pulse. I do it all the time. But you can do a quick stew in bbq sauce. Brown chunks of round quickly, and cook in the sauce--thinned with some water so it won't stick and burn--just until tender. Some sauteed onion and garlic, and aromatic herbs can only make it tastier.



#552 dcandohio

dcandohio

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 526 posts

Posted 13 November 2014 - 05:06 PM

You can grind meat in a food processor. cut into chunks and put in the freezer for about 15 minutes, then pulse. I do it all the time. But you can do a quick stew in bbq sauce. Brown chunks of round quickly, and cook in the sauce--thinned with some water so it won't stick and burn--just until tender. Some sauteed onion and garlic, and aromatic herbs can only make it tastier.


Thanks. That's what i'll do!

Shut up and pour another glass of wine, please.


#553 The Hersch

The Hersch

    A Young Man Grown Old

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,106 posts

Posted 14 November 2014 - 07:36 PM

Thanks. That's what i'll do!

 

If you had taken my Swiss steak suggestion, you could have had this:

SwissSteak_zps7f1b4740.jpg


  • dcandohio likes this

Tell me, thou little bird that singest,

Who taught my grief to thee?


#554 dcandohio

dcandohio

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 526 posts

Posted 14 November 2014 - 09:16 PM

If you had taken my Swiss steak suggestion, you could have had this:
SwissSteak_zps7f1b4740.jpg


That looks delicious but my friend would have thought...yuk...which is why I went the safe "BBQ" route.

Shut up and pour another glass of wine, please.


#555 dcandohio

dcandohio

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 526 posts

Posted 04 December 2014 - 07:53 AM

Question: I have some good local bacon and am going to make candied bacon as an appetizer for two parties. The thought occurred to me that if I made a batch, cooled it well, and vacuum sealed it (I have that contraption), I could bring it as a gift when I travel for the holidays. I would make it the day before travel, and we would probably eat it within 2-3 days. I realize the bacon may soften, but would this be safe? Bacon is cured, it would be fully cooked...I'm thinking it would be OK. You?

Shut up and pour another glass of wine, please.


#556 Pat

Pat

    clownfish

  • Membership Director
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,324 posts

Posted 04 December 2014 - 09:52 AM

Precooked bacon is available for sale, unrefrigerated, in grocery stores, but it appears they do something extra special to preserve it.  This is what the USDA Bacon and Food Safety FAQ says about it:  

 
How is cooked bacon made shelf stable?
To make bacon safe to store at room temperature (shelf stable), it is precooked in the plant to have a water activity at or below 0.85 to control Staphylococcus aureus. The cooked yield is 40% of the raw weight.

 

 

I don't know how candying figures into that water activity situation.



#557 dcandohio

dcandohio

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 526 posts

Posted 11 December 2014 - 08:19 AM

OK, I experimented! I did three tests.
1. Candied bacon stored in a ziplock bag overnight, zapped in microwave for 12 seconds on a brown paper bag and left to crisp as it cooled. This piece was fine.
2. same storage, stored two days, and microwaved. Fine.
3. Candied bacon, vacuum sealed, stored for 4 days, then microwaved. It was OK. Flavor was fine, bacon stayed a bit softer than previous experiments. I ate it and did not feel sick!

I am not sure the vacuum sealing is worth the time unless I was bringing this treat somewhere where only a microwave was available. Given how easy candied bacon is to make, how tantalizing the house smells while it is cooking, and the wide availability of ingredients, I think I would rather just make it on site.

Shut up and pour another glass of wine, please.


#558 porcupine

porcupine

    ill-tempered sea bass

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,035 posts

Posted 05 January 2015 - 08:22 AM

Bought a celeriac at the market yesterday - I've never cooked one.  Planning to make a soup out of it, with chicken stock and maybe an apple.  Any recipes you'd recommend, or tips?  Sure is an ugly thing.


Elizabeth Miller
fast cars, slow food

http://elizaberryblog.wordpress.com/


#559 lperry

lperry

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,931 posts

Posted 05 January 2015 - 09:12 AM

If I may suggest a different route, celery root and apple, shredded, salted to get some water out, tossed with rĂ©moulade, capers, and Italian parsley, well, it's a beautiful thing.  :)


  • JPW likes this

#560 porcupine

porcupine

    ill-tempered sea bass

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,035 posts

Posted 05 January 2015 - 12:27 PM

Sounds lovely, but it's 36 degrees out with snow in the forecast.  Later today I'm firing up the woodstove, and soup is on the menu.  :-)  Possibly hot cocoa and chocolate chip cookies for dessert.  I'll try the salad when it's warmer outside.


Elizabeth Miller
fast cars, slow food

http://elizaberryblog.wordpress.com/


#561 hillvalley

hillvalley

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,485 posts

Posted 05 January 2015 - 12:40 PM

I love celeriac.  Besides the soup I treat it like a potato and make a mash or make oven fries.  Sounds like the start to a perfect afternoon.  Word of warning with the apple though-I find it can over power the celeriac. 


  • porcupine likes this
How do you know you're a well-adjusted foodie?-babka
Will schmooz for schmaltz-qwertyy

Just keep on smiling-Mrs. Brown

She never promised that life would be easy, but she did promise that if I hung with her the food would be good. -Joan Bauer


...the craving of a Jew for pork, in particular when it has been deep-fried, is a force greater than night or distance or a cold blast off the Gulf of Alaska.
-Michael Chabon

#562 Pat

Pat

    clownfish

  • Membership Director
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,324 posts

Posted 05 January 2015 - 01:05 PM

I like mixing celeriac with potatoes for a puree.  I have a Molly O'Neill recipe from the Times in the 90s that I generally use, but I think most recipes for that kind of mash or puree are pretty similar.  And you could add stock to it and make a soup :) .


  • JPW and porcupine like this

#563 lperry

lperry

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,931 posts

Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:10 PM

OK, going the hot route I'll add that you can slice thinly and layer with potatoes into a lovely gratin. 


  • porcupine likes this

#564 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,888 posts

Posted 05 January 2015 - 07:18 PM

I'm probably a little late to this party, but I can't help chiming in. Soup of the evening. Celery root, potato, leek, onion, chicken broth, aromatic herbs, when everything is cooked, puree and add some cream. Perfection on a cold night.



#565 porcupine

porcupine

    ill-tempered sea bass

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,035 posts

Posted 06 January 2015 - 07:10 AM

What I made was not dissimilar to yours, Zora.  Celeriac and a tiny amount of onion, cooked with bay leaf and thyme in chicken stock and apple cider, then pureed and finished with a little heavy cream and minced parsley.  I added a garnish of thinly sliced tiny new sorrel leaves and a tiny bit of serrano ham, each of which was almost overpowering; weird, because the soup was so pungent.  Still, really tasty.

 

hillvalley, re: treating like potato: could you make latkes out of it?


Elizabeth Miller
fast cars, slow food

http://elizaberryblog.wordpress.com/


#566 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,888 posts

Posted 06 January 2015 - 11:12 AM

I'm not hillvalley, but I'm highly opinionated so I'll respond as well. The texture of celeriac is different than potato--it's more watery, less starchy. I think to make latkes with celeriac, the best strategy would be to mix it with potato. That, as I'm imagining it in my mind's palate, would be fabulous.


  • porcupine likes this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Help!

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users