Jump to content




Photo

Thanksgiving [s]2011[/s] 2012!

Thanksgiving

  • Please log in to reply
71 replies to this topic

#51 lperry

lperry

    leviathan

  • Calendar Girl
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,590 posts

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:40 AM

Change of plans, as we just went from six to ten guests. Deviled eggs, so I can use my plates, marinated kalamata olives with herbs and garlic from the garden, and Julia Child's Queen of Sheba cake for a dessert option, Grand Marnier used instead of rum. I'm going to try propping the eggs on their sides this time around to see if it really centers the yolks. It can't hurt.

#52 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,587 posts

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:00 PM

I'm dry brining the Polyface turkey this year--Russ Parsons swears by it, so we shall see. smoking it with hazelnut wood tomorrow--one of our trees died a while ago and got cut down and cut up. it's very dry, so I'm going to soak it, hoping it'll smoke before it burns. stuffing will be made with Atwater rustic bread, eco-friendly sausage, chestnuts, etc. creamed onions, because J. has to have them. mashed white and sweet potatoes. gravy. brussels sprouts, probably with some bacon. possibly some roasted root veg. cranberry-ginger compote; quince mostarda. pumpkin pie, pecan tart. a 2009 Schlumberger pinot gris and a 2000 Cotes de Nuit. starting with a charcuterie board with some venison paté and bresaola from Jamie Stachowski, iberico ham. costing a fortune, but I haven't been able to do Thanksgiving for several years and have much to be thankful for this year, including a functioning knee.

#53 Xochitl10

Xochitl10

    えいえい東北!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 886 posts

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:32 PM

Thanksgiving with Azami's family is always a "traditional" feast, with various family members contributing apps, sides, and desserts. This year, we were encouraged to be "exotic" (or "spicy," I don't remember which) with our contributions. Azami reminded me that, plain language of encouragement aside, his family is not super adventurous. There's also a bit of a thing for us to have something Japanese at Thanksgiving (one year, a Japanese friend brought sushi to our traditional turkey feast, and it was fabulous). So, we're taking our favorite takikomi gohan -- rice, carrots, shiitake, burdock root, aburaage (deep-fried tofu sheet), and substituting turkey thigh for chicken.

北緯39度

"I am not edible!" -- C-3PO


#54 ktmoomau

ktmoomau

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,778 posts

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:23 PM

Pie crust made, will make a pumpkin custard and pecan bourbon pie tomorrow, the extra pumpkin custard is going into ramekins, so it will be gf, I might put a burnt sugar topping on it. Already made polenta sausage wedges that I will brown then heat tomorrow. Dinner at my brother's tomorrow, his wife is gf. Bringing lactose free milk for the mashed potatoes so I can actually eat them! Also bringing a double magnum of wine and green beans. We are going to have a ton of food. I think we need a couple more people, we are only going to have seven.

Happy Thanksgiving all, be safe in that kitchen!

But I learned fast how to keep my head up 'cause I
Know I got this side of me that
Wants to grab the yoke from the pilot and just
Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
www.rrbmdk.com
www.katelintaylor.com


#55 monavano

monavano

    leviathan

  • The Blog Keeper
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,245 posts

Posted 22 November 2012 - 07:34 AM

Also bringing a double magnum of wine :o
Mr. MV and I are sharing with some of our neighbors this Thanksgiving. We're just getting back into the kitchen, organizing and figuring it all out, so I'm glad there's not a great deal of pressure. But there will be plenty of food! We'll be sending plates and leftovers to some other neighbors who for various reasons are not partaking in the holiday this year.
i have a 12 lb. turkey that I will be roasting with convection (a first for me) and using a buttery, herbed cheesecloth over the breast and legs with about a 10-15 minute period at the end of cooking without it to brown if needed. I'm intrigued with this method-- I just happened to catch several cooking segments using this method this year.
Sides include vermouth and giblet gravy, sauteed mushrooms with a sherry cream sauce, cauliflower and Vivaldi potatoes with Parm and mascarone, Mr. MV's sage, sausage and dried cherry bread stuffing, roasted brussels with a caramel balsamic sauce and crispy pancetta, sauteed spinach with shallots and nutmeg and cranberry chutney with orange, grapefruit and pecans.
TJ's pumpkin pie for dessert.
Happy Thanksgiving all!

#56 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,587 posts

Posted 22 November 2012 - 09:11 AM

i have a 12 lb. turkey that I will be roasting with convection (a first for me) and using a buttery, herbed cheesecloth over the breast and legs with about a 10-15 minute period at the end of cooking without it to brown if needed. I'm intrigued with this method-- I just happened to catch several cooking segments using this method this year.

I've done the cheesecloth on the breast in the past. What really works to prevent overcooking the breast, is to lay the bird, breast down on some ice packs while you are bringing the rest of the bird up to room temp before cooking. that way, the breast starts much colder and takes longer to cook, evening out the time between dark and light meat.

#57 Night Owl

Night Owl

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 124 posts

Posted 22 November 2012 - 09:56 AM

Wishing everyone a Happy Thanksgiving!
This is the first of our annual "unpardoned" turkeys for tonight's dinner -- gobble gobble!!! 2012 gobbler.jpg

"It's so beautifully arranged on the plate -- you know somebody's fingers have been all over it." ~Julia Child


#58 Barbara

Barbara

    Heretic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,258 posts

Posted 22 November 2012 - 10:39 AM

Pie crust made, will make a pumpkin custard and pecan bourbon pie tomorrow, the extra pumpkin custard is going into ramekins, so it will be gf, I might put a burnt sugar topping on it. Already made polenta sausage wedges that I will brown then heat tomorrow. Dinner at my brother's tomorrow, his wife is gf. Bringing lactose free milk for the mashed potatoes so I can actually eat them! Also bringing a double magnum of wine and green beans. We are going to have a ton of food. I think we need a couple more people, we are only going to have seven.

Happy Thanksgiving all, be safe in that kitchen!


Quite by accident, I found that using Almond milk in the mashed potatoes worked just fine.

#59 monavano

monavano

    leviathan

  • The Blog Keeper
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,245 posts

Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:01 PM

I've done the cheesecloth on the breast in the past. What really works to prevent overcooking the breast, is to lay the bird, breast down on some ice packs while you are bringing the rest of the bird up to room temp before cooking. that way, the breast starts much colder and takes longer to cook, evening out the time between dark and light meat.


Saw this a little too late, but, what I did was truss the bird as tightly as I could to draw the legs up to the breast. It's not pretty, but I hope the breast keeps moist. I'll remember this for next time. Thanks!
ps... I like the idea of icing the breast vs. starting with the breast down then turning up later.

#60 DC Deb

DC Deb

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 225 posts

Posted 22 November 2012 - 02:26 PM

Happy Thanksgiving everyone! Hope your turkey comes out juicy and your pie delicious. (I had to work yesterday so I bought a Clemnt's pie from Chevy Chase Market.)

#61 thistle

thistle

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,203 posts

Posted 23 November 2012 - 02:23 PM

I screwed up my T'giving turkey for the first time-glad I got that out of the way, I had nightmares all week, so they were either premonitions or self-fulfilling prophecies. I got up at 4:30 to start the smoker, the 14 lb. bird was on from 5-12, & my thermapen said 180, when I poked it in what I thought was the thickest part. After driving up to my SIL's house in Potomac, I started to carve & was horrified by interior. I also smoked a tiny breast, which was fine, & we had a ham, I threw the wretched bird back in the oven for an hour, & then it was fine, so post-dinner turkey for everyone. I KNEW I should have done it the day before, but my son pooh-poohed the idea (of course, he also didn't volunteer to get up at 4:30).

Everything else was great, a smaller group, which was a nice change, & we all ate too much. I brought the carcasses & trimmings home, & have 2 crockpots of stock working- a small one w/ shallot, lemongrass, ginger, star anise for turkey pho, & a large one w/ onion, mushroom, s&p for soup TBD. I hope everyone had a lovely Thanksgiving, & enjoyed visiting w/ family & friends...

#62 Ilaine

Ilaine

    Catfish

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,004 posts

Posted 23 November 2012 - 02:41 PM

Well, if cooking turkey was easy there would not be thousands of recipes.

What I learned. Not going to buy a 25 pound heritage turkey ever again, especially not from a sweet lady lawyer who decided that having a farm was more fun than practicing law. It's going to be a tom, and the freaking feathers are going to be big, and the nice people who raise their turkeys running around in the grass and eating bugs are not going to pull all of them out because they are amateurs and the people helping them are even more amateurs. So you will spend hours with a pair of tweezers pulling out the ends of the feathers that were left when they were done.

And you can't spatchcock a 25 pound turkey because you don't have a pan big enough for it and even if you did it would not fit in the oven. So you have to cut it in half.

And if you cook it at 450, as is the "advice" for heritage birds, a half turkey cooks in less than an hour. And the breast will be done before the legs are done, so you have to cut that half into half again, take out the breast and finish the legs.

And when it's cooked, even perfectly, it's going to be tough.

And there will still be feather bits, so nobody will eat the skin.

It has a good flavor, though. I am going to braise the other half in the slow cooker, with the turkey broth I made from the tail and backbone. Sacrificed the turkey drippings and yummies for my son's beef gravy for the prime rib. He won't eat turkey. So no turkey gravy. But it added a flavor kick to his gravy.

Next year I will still go heritage, but from a professional outfit, and not bigger than 14 pounds. Going to try it again but at a lower oven temp.

Spatchcocking really does save oven time, so I will do that again.

I'm just here for the chow.


#63 thistle

thistle

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,203 posts

Posted 23 November 2012 - 02:53 PM

Thank you, Ilaine, I feel better now, that almost sounds worse than my nightmares...thank god for all the other things we can eat at T'giving, besides turkey....

#64 Ilaine

Ilaine

    Catfish

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,004 posts

Posted 23 November 2012 - 03:13 PM

Well, there were other screwups, such as, the mashed turnips were so liquid that we called them "turnip soup". Next time I will either nuke them or steam them, instead of boiling them. And younger son spent the evening in high dudgeon because we did not have the "right" tamari (San-J), so his green beans did not have the "right" flavor.

But everybody raved about the corn bread and wild rice dressing. I made gluten free corn bread with almond flour instead of wheat flour, crumbled it up and toasted the crumbs. Boiled wild rice, which come to think of it, was a screw up, too. Followed Bittman's recipe for wild rice pilaf, but some of the grains never got soft. I think the wild rice was a little old and dried out, maybe. Next time I will try stirring them in the oil until all of them pop.

There is a huge list of things we cannot add to the dressing, due to various iterations of picky eaters. No mushrooms, no pork, no oysters, no nuts, no fruit.

But we can add lots of chopped onion, celery, green onion, all sauteed until soft, and lots of fresh herbs. And Bells' Poultry Seasoning. It would not be Thanksgiving without Bells, is my opinion. It tastes exactly like Thanksgiving should taste.

Next time I will roast a head of garlic to keep around for doctoring things that need a little umph.

Someone just drove by with a Christmas tree on top of their car. Sigh. Time for the next holiday.

I'm just here for the chow.


#65 Barbara

Barbara

    Heretic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,258 posts

Posted 23 November 2012 - 03:59 PM

Someone just drove by with a Christmas tree on top of their car. Sigh. Time for the next holiday.


When I went to the Whole Paycheck on P Street nine days ago--Nov. 14--they already had a supply of Christmas trees for sale. What dope will buy a tree six weeks before Christmas???

#66 thistle

thistle

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,203 posts

Posted 23 November 2012 - 04:05 PM

Barbara,
I'm sorry I didn't make your pumpkin cheesecake for T'giving, but I didn't want to upstage my SIL's MIL, Ellen, who makes the most excellent pies every T'giving-pumpkin, pecan, & apple-I can't even begin to compete. Lizzy made a poundcake, but almost everyone (even after stuffing themselves silly) wanted pie..not looking forward to dragging out the Xmas decorations this weekend, but Elizabeth has already drawn up an elaborate plan...

#67 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,587 posts

Posted 24 November 2012 - 04:57 PM

SIL and BIL are on the train back to NYC, after a second round of sandwiches, smoked turkey salad this time. And a second soup. Yesterday's soup was based on the leftover roasted veg dish (buttercup squash, red pepper, rutabaga and celery root), run through the Vita-Mix blender with turkey stock and some leftover creamed onions and a few dashes of Marie Sharp's hot sauce. Today's soup was sauteed leeks, celery and fennel, pureed with more turkey stock and creamed onions, and mashed white potatoes stirred in with the leftover hot milk from this morning's café au lait. (I didn't put the mashed potatoes in the blender, lest they turn to glue.) With last night's sliced turkey sandwiches we had heated up leftover stuffing and gravy, and finished up the brussels sprouts. So I'm looking pretty good as far as dealing with the leftovers. All I have now is the denuded carcass for smoked turkey stock, which will make killer soups, a bit more stuffing, gravy and sweet potatoes.

Friday brunch was the highlight of the holiday for me-- a selection of goodies from Russ and Daughters in NYC, which my SIL and BIL brought with them when they arrived on Thanksgiving morning. Assorted bagel. Two kinds of lox, three kinds of cream cheese, pickled herring in sour cream and freshly salted Holland herring. Served with sliced Bermuda onion, sliced tomatoes, kalamata olives and capers. And lots of press-pot café au lait. Absolute heaven.

The dry-brined smoked turkey was good, but not fabulous. I think I will go back to herb-brining, because though I added herbs to the salt rub (lavender powder, onion powder, powdered oregano, white pepper) the flavor didn't get in and infuse the meat the way a flavored brine does.

#68 Sundae in the Park

Sundae in the Park

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 605 posts

Posted 25 November 2012 - 06:00 PM

Spatchcocking really does save oven time, so I will do that again.


It does, but I didn't understand just how much time it would save us, unfortunately. By the time I thought to check it (55 minutes or so), most of the meat was already dry, dry, dry. Note - a 10-pound turkey is really just a big chicken and a spatchcock prep will have it cooked in no time. Most of the drippings were boiled off and the rest, once scraped off the foil, were more like slightly burnt demi-glace (and delicious, so that wasn't much of a problem). So, lesson learned here as well! I think I will practice on some chickens and have my timing perfected for next year.

#69 Ilaine

Ilaine

    Catfish

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,004 posts

Posted 26 November 2012 - 08:28 PM

Agreed that turkey demi-glace is suprisingly much tastier than turkey, No idea why.

ETA, braised turkey with daikon and star anise and turkey broth is almost to die for. Almost.

Wish I could eat rice. That might be a platonic dish.

I'm just here for the chow.


#70 ktmoomau

ktmoomau

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,778 posts

Posted 26 November 2012 - 11:02 PM

When I went to the Whole Paycheck on P Street nine days ago--Nov. 14--they already had a supply of Christmas trees for sale. What dope will buy a tree six weeks before Christmas???

We used to buy ours the day after Thanksgiving. We also lived in Western Maryland, cut our own drove it 15 minutes home and soaked it in a bucket of water before we brought it in, kept it watered, they always lasted a ridiculously long time. I have tried to lower my tree expectation, they just aren't the same here, even if you cut your own. There is something about a tree from Garrett County you can just tell, it looks so good. My brother brought one all the way home in his truck. I would like to call him stupid for the whole thing, but it looks fantastic sitting decorated in his living room right now and I am really kind of jealous.

But I learned fast how to keep my head up 'cause I
Know I got this side of me that
Wants to grab the yoke from the pilot and just
Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
www.rrbmdk.com
www.katelintaylor.com


#71 ktmoomau

ktmoomau

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,778 posts

Posted 26 November 2012 - 11:05 PM

Well I think I overbaked my pies a little, they were still good, but not as good as usual. We had fresh oysters that we quickly grilled to pop them open and shucked. Ate with some cocktail sauce I made. They were ridiculously good. My Mom doctored up some good sauerkraut, made beautiful lf and gf mashed potatoes and gravy. Everything was very tasty and it was so nice to be in DC. I was a bit worried about the wine, we got the cork out, decanted and it was great, it took 4 decanters. Anyway on to the next one.

But I learned fast how to keep my head up 'cause I
Know I got this side of me that
Wants to grab the yoke from the pilot and just
Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
www.rrbmdk.com
www.katelintaylor.com


#72 Anna Blume

Anna Blume

    fruit bat

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,894 posts

Posted 27 November 2012 - 04:02 PM

This is the first of our annual "unpardoned" turkeys for tonight's dinner -- gobble gobble!!! 2012 gobbler.jpg

That's adorable, Linda!!!

Here's to those who don't roast turkey for Thanksgiving! Best protein on my plate was a foil-wrapped brisket cooked outdoors on a grill whose heritage is pure Texas.

My contribution owes a debt to JPW and rather mindless stamina. 295 Brussels sprouts plucked off stalks, trimmed and halved before roasting.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Thanksgiving

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users