Ericandblueboy

Bob's Shanghai 66, Shanghainese Cash-Only Xiao Long Bao with a Taiwanese Chef in Rockville

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Anyone know the hours or have the menu?

All I've found is some sketchy information that it's in the original Bob's Noodle 66 location at 305 N. Washington St., and that it might be affiliated with a Shanghai chain.

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Look up Bob's Shanghai, which what the English sign says.

Is it called Bob's Shanghai 66, or Nan Xiang? If the former, this gets a thread merge. Is it owned by Bob? That would get a thread merge, too.

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The original paper sign in the window said Nan Xiang, but the menu and current paper sign say Bob's Shanghai 66. Not clear whether there is still a Nan Xiang franchise deal in place.

However, it is a COMPLETELY different menu than the Bob's Noodle 66 across the street (in the old Bob's 88 location).

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Is it called Bob's Shanghai 66, or Nan Xiang? If the former, this gets a thread merge. Is it owned by Bob? That would get a thread merge, too.

In looking at the pictures of the sign, it appears that the Chinese characters match the ones in the title of this thread so I think it says "Nan Xiang Xiao Long Bao," while the English part of the sign says "Bob's Shanghai 66." From what I've gathered, Bob is in fact the owner.

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Is it called Bob's Shanghai 66, or Nan Xiang? If the former, this gets a thread merge. Is it owned by Bob? That would get a thread merge, too.

The original paper sign in the window said Nan Xiang, but the menu and current paper sign say Bob's Shanghai 66. Not clear whether there is still a Nan Xiang franchise deal in place.

However, it is a COMPLETELY different menu than the Bob's Noodle 66 across the street (in the old Bob's 88 location).

In looking at the pictures of the sign, it appears that the Chinese characters match the ones in the title of this thread so I think it says "Nan Xiang Xiao Long Bao," while the English part of the sign says "Bob's Shanghai 66." From what I've gathered, Bob is in fact the owner.

Okay, so at 305 N. Washington St., we now have Bob's Shanghai 66 (perhaps called Nan Xiang in Chinese), which is located in the former Bob's Noodles 66 location.

And at 316 N. Washington St., we now have (the new location and version of) Bob's Noodles 66, which is located in the former Bob's 88 Shabu Shabu location.

Jesus.

Apologies in advance for any bad puns, but I'll bet the first person to answer this gets it wrong.

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I went there for lunch with my parents. The soup regular soup dumplings were good. The crab version was over-priced and didn't really taste like crab. The small plate of pig ears was good but pretty spicy.

My folks have gone there for dinner but didn't think the main dishes were very good. Important note: they are cash only.

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Went last night with a big group. Mostly very good.

Soup dumplings broke as we served them, but full of pork and very juicy. The chive dumplings and shrimp shu mei were the stars.

Salt and Pepper fried flounder was terrific. Not greasy, very crispy and the fish was perfectly cooked- still moist. Rice cakes stir fried with chicken was also good, smoky from the wok.

I wish the menu was organized a little better with categories, at first we couldn't find the dumplings. Also surprised at the size of the menu...dumplings are only a very small part. Noodle soups, etc.

Bob came over and was his usual gracious host. He appears much happier these days.

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Okay, so at 305 N. Washington St., we now have Bob's Shanghai 66 (perhaps called Nan Xiang in Chinese), which is located in the former Bob's Noodles 66 location.

And at 316 N. Washington St., we now have (the new location and version of) Bob's Noodles 66, which is located in the former Bob's 88 Shabu Shabu location.

Jesus.

Apologies in advance for any bad puns, but I'll bet the first person to answer this gets it wrong.

I'll bite, even though I think it's the obvious answer -

"Liu? See, you got a lot of explaining to do!"

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Just returned from Bob's Shanghai 66 in the old Bob's Noodle space. Totally renovated with a glassed in room for the soup dumpling makers. The interior has also improved slightly with new paint and a variety of bamboo strainers and decorations hanging on the walls. The menu has also changed in format and copy and I prefer it. They give you the very convenient sushi-style check list. It's double sided and there are a *mere* 130 items to choose from -- this included the weekend only Shanghai dim sum items. The prices range from $1.50 for a sesame roll to $35.95 for a whole tea smoked duck. The average price point is in the $7 range for small dishes and $10.95 range for regular dishes. In contrast, Joe's Szechuan is priced a dollar or so less for comparable dishes.

As far as I can tell, the foundation of the menu is still Taiwanese but there are some Shanghai and Szechuan dishes in the mix that worked for me. Two of us had the following:

Pork soup dumplings (xiao long bao): you get the standard 6. I'd say they are a must order but they could've been better. It's all handmade and seasoned well. They won't be the best you've ever had but it's the first time I've had them in DC and they did not disappoint. Ours were not particularly hot but it might've been becauase we were there at 3pm when their turnover slowed down. ($5.99)

Fried crescent dumplings with leeks (jiu cai hezi): two reasonably sized pan fried dumplings stuffed with leeks, bits of pressed five-spice tofu, and mei fun. It was nothing special but fine. ($4.95)

Edamame with mustard greens (Maodou xueluohong): it's such a simple dish but this is the freshest version i've had short of making it myself. plump, steamed edamame with chopped mustard greens -- both vibrant green -- and tossed with small cubes of pressed five-spice tofu and a little sesame oil and salt. I doubt they prepare the tofu in-house -- i wish someone would -- but it was still good. ($4.95)

Spicy pork tripe (hongyou dusi): cold dish of sliced and boiled large intestine that were very well cleaned and tender and tossed in chili oil. there were also julienned cucumbers and this was hands down my favorite dish. ($6.95)

Cumin lamb (ziran yangrou): shaved lamb seasoned with lots of cumin and stir fried with roughly chopped long horn peppers, red bell peppers, julienned onion, garlic, cilantro, and dried chilis. very tasty and also a favorite. that said, it's not the best version i've had and i prefer joe's. they do the dry stir fry method and the meat is cut differently so it's some bits are almost jerky-like. ($12.95)

Scallion noodles (congyou banmian): thin wheat noodles topped with five spice ground beef and some baby bok choy....there were no scallions to be found! the dish was not dissimilar to dan dan noodles but without the ma la. it is the chinese spaghetti with meat sauce. the five spice meat was really good but the dish would been a hit if said scallions were actually included. ($6.95)

Stir fried yu cai (their green vegetable of the day): it was fine but not cheap...i never understand this because yu cai is pretty common and not like some of the more delicate super seasonal vegetables....pea shoots, water spinach, etc...($12.95)

All done, with tax and tip the bill was $72. We got A LOT of food so I found this quite reasonable. I'd go back to try more but I have a feeling I will still prefer Joe's after going through the menu.

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Also went to Nan Xiang last night. Soup dumplings, without a drive to new york: awesome. Not the best soup dumplings ever; the dough was a bit thick, and the broth didn't pop as much as I wanted, but all of them made it to my mouth without losing their hot soupy goodness.

We also got the fried crescent dumplings with leeks, but ... ok. not awesome. Scallion pancake did not satisfy. Nick ordered fried fish with black pepper, which was tasty but I wished the accompanying greens, peppers, + garlic had been more than briefly introduced to heat— they were essentially raw. :/ I got some ma po tofu, which will be my lunch today. Not terribly spicy, and I can't quite identify the flavor profile of the meat in the dish... something along the lines of a ragu? It was registering more "italian" on my tongue than "asian". Maybe I'll have a better description today.

But... soup dumplings!

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The crab version was over-priced and didn't really taste like crab.

That's my personal experience with all crab soup dumplings (including those at Din Tai Fung). The filling is not all crab, in fact, I think there's very little crab, some times maybe just some crab paste for flavor. Some recipe calls for just crab roe. That said, the version at Bob's Shanghai had noticeable crab flavor if you suck out the soup first. They had good you tiao (fried cruller), just average wonton in hot sauce (6 wontons in the bowl).

Hours are mon-fri 11-10, weekends 10-10.

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Also went to Nan Xiang last night. Soup dumplings, without a drive to new york: awesome. Not the best soup dumplings ever; the dough was a bit thick, and the broth didn't pop as much as I wanted, but all of them made it to my mouth without losing their hot soupy goodness.

I am wondering if they have the same person making the dumplings all of the time. I say that because the dumplings that we had today had very thin skins.

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I'll bite, even though I think it's the obvious answer -

"Liu? See, you got a lot of explaining to do!"

Close enough!

I love Liu, see?

Thought someone would say ba-ba-Liu.

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I am wondering if they have the same person making the dumplings all of the time. I say that because the dumplings that we had today had very thin skins.

They do not. Went back this week, there were two women making them, and neither of them appeared to be particularly deft or speedy while filling the steamers, and about 65% of the dumplings we had lost their soupy goodness. All were thin-skinned, and it looked like they were overfilling them. But the pork blend was tastier, so I remain conflicted.

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They do not. Went back this week, there were two women making them, and neither of them appeared to be particularly deft or speedy while filling the steamers, and about 65% of the dumplings we had lost their soupy goodness. All were thin-skinned, and it looked like they were overfilling them. But the pork blend was tastier, so I remain conflicted.

Same here -- when i went, two women (they looked like sisters and i'm not being racist) looked like they were in training while a man was showing them how to pinch off the dough. my skins weren't terribly delicate or thin AND some of the dumplings started leaking but i still enjoyed the meal overall.

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Today two women were making the dumplings and we had none of those issues.

I should also mention that the cold beef and tripe dish is delicious.

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An early brunch and a late-afternoon errand near Rockville Town Center brought us to the Dining Guide in search of a good meal that would still permit us to get back to Virginia by bedtime. So we arrived at this version of Bob's just in time for family rush hour, with a baby or toddler at virtually every table. And although our kids were not the best-behaved in the bunch, the staff certainly made us feel welcome, although we did end up at the far end of the restaurant from the window on the dumpling-makers.

Our dishes were generally excellent, with lots of overlap between our order and those described above.

Six of the crab xiao long bao were delicious. They were exactly the right temperature -- hot enough to be bracing, but just short of the temperature that would burn, and the flavor was delicious. Not enough of an expert to weigh in on thick or thin, but 4 out of 6 made it to the mouth intact, while the other two were inadvertently punctured with chopsticks. (which won't tell you much without a demonstration of our skill level). Are there places that serve them in a soup spoon rather than directly in the steam basket?)

Peas with mustard greens were delightfully refreshing on a hot day - exceedingly fresh, nicely tender, good enough that we considered getting a second order.

Cumin lamb -- very good, along the lines described by Cizuka Seki -- but just a little something missing relative to the best versions I've had, which have a little more zing.

Shrimp siu mai - we ordered this, but I think we got some other sort of dumpling stuffed with pork. What we got was delicious, and I only realized it wasn't what I was expecting when it was all gone. Meant to ask about it, but forgot.

Bamboo shoots - portion was a little skimpy, but fresh & nicely spicy with chili oil.

Taiwanese noodle soup -- this is the one thing we wouldn't order again. The noodles were fine - tasty and cooked just to the right al dente texture, but the wanly-flavored broth was disappointing. There's probably a better choice among the soups & noodle dishes.

I hate paying cash, but all in all, the food was worth the stop.

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Ba ba liu, ba ba liu!

Sounds like we need a $20 dollar dinner here

Close enough!

I love Liu, see?

Thought someone would say ba-ba-Liu.

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Finally got around to trying Bob's Shanghai and based on the first experience, will be returning later this week. One thing I didn't realize in reading earlier posts is that Bob's XLB are larger and have far more broth than others in the MD area, e.g., Shanghai Taste, Tai Shan, Tony Lin's. A filling treat.

We ordered just a few things, there were only three of us. Quick rundown:

Regular pork XLB: Held up perfectly from steamer to soup spoon, no tears, a crazy amount of broth inside, good flavor

Spicy wontons: Good, not great, think there was a nice touch of szechuan peppercorn in the sauce, but prefer Tony Lin's

Pork w/bean sauce noodles / Ja Jang Mian: Delicious, simple & straightforward, the closest version to what my dad used to make for us, growing up

Snow pea sprouts: Hesitated to order (my parents' voice in my ear that it's not the right season), but did so anyway and glad I did - perfectly cooked and tasty

Scallion pancake: A bust, no flavor, limp

As we left, I noticed posted on the wall a few kinds of beverages, one of which was a plum drink (suan mei tang), which I grew up loving especially in the summertime, so will have to order that and see if it's good.

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Finally got around to trying Bob's Shanghai and based on the first experience, will be returning later this week. One thing I didn't realize in reading earlier posts is that Bob's XLB are larger and have far more broth than others in the MD area, e.g., Shanghai Taste, Tai Shan, Tony Lin's. A filling treat.

We ordered just a few things, there were only three of us. Quick rundown:

Regular pork XLB: Held up perfectly from steamer to soup spoon, no tears, a crazy amount of broth inside, good flavor

Spicy wontons: Good, not great, think there was a nice touch of szechuan peppercorn in the sauce, but prefer Tony Lin's

Pork w/bean sauce noodles / Ja Jang Mian: Delicious, simple & straightforward, the closest version to what my dad used to make for us, growing up

Snow pea sprouts: Hesitated to order (my parents' voice in my ear that it's not the right season), but did so anyway and glad I did - perfectly cooked and tasty

Scallion pancake: A bust, no flavor, limp

As we left, I noticed posted on the wall a few kinds of beverages, one of which was a plum drink (suan mei tang), which I grew up loving especially in the summertime, so will have to order that and see if it's good.

NightOwl, have to ask since can't really intuit it from what you've written and you are an authority here.

Are these the best XLB in our area in your view?

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NightOwl, have to ask since can't really intuit it from what you've written and you are an authority here.

Are these the best XLB in our area in your view?

Sorry, haven't been able to be on dr.com much since this post, and had to postpone plans to try their XLB after my first foray (and thus answer your question, darkstar965 -- not to mention I definitely don't consider myself an authority, simply a major enthusiast!).

But a new, nice find there... I did stop there quickly last night to pick up carryout ja jiang main for my dad last night and found out that you can buy freshly wrapped XLB to bring home and steam yourself (not frozen). That's a great option to keep in mind, I think...

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They are currently easily the best of the ones I've had in this area, yes.  They are the only ones whose wrappers, level of fill, and level of soup are close to correct, but not good enough to compare with any of a handful of XLB shops in NYC, much less make the top tier of XLB worldwide.

In particular, I thought the original flavor was just okay - a bit weak.  The crab variant was really not to my taste either, dominated by a flavor I associate with mediocre dried crabmeat, and nothing at all like a good crab XLB.

I wish they had the more intensely porky flavor of the ones from Hunan Garden (Rockville) thirty years ago, but that chef is long, long gone (and his wrappers could have been better).  My current #2 local pick is actually Sichuan Jin River, but their overall form is clearly inferior to Bob's.

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