DonRocks

Beer Selection at Giant and Safeway

116 posts in this topic

Pilsner Urquell = Fermented Skunk Piss

Old Dominion Lager = Club Soda Seasoned With Dried Caterpillar Fur

Bass Ale = Caramel-Colored Rhineroceros Nostril Juice

Sam Adams = 55-Year-Old Malted Milk Ball Shat Out Of Godzilla's Ass

Corona = Watered-Down Drippings of Infected Chihuahua Penis

Heineken = Diluted Pilsner Urquell Mixed With Giraffe Spit

Yuengling = Semi-Clear Liquid Extracted From Yak Colon During Stressful Bout Of Diarrhea

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Corona = Watered-Down Drippings of Infected Chihuahua Penis

Yo Quiero Taco Bell. :lol: I think you are passing judgement on the Chihuahua.

I strongly believe that there is a dog breed to go with every beer label.

Thanks for not beating down Amstel Light and Michelob Ultra because we're all fat.

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Corona = Watered-Down Drippings of Infected Chihuahua Penis

I dunno Don... That would imply a recognisable flavor!

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I curious as to just how Rocks is able to identify all of these unusual flavors. The descriptions imply at least passing familiarity with them.

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Pilsner Urquell = Fermented Skunk Piss

Old Dominion Lager = Club Soda Seasoned With Dried Caterpillar Fur

Bass Ale = Caramel-Colored Rhineroceros Nostril Juice

Sam Adams = 55-Year-Old Malted Milk Ball Shat Out Of Godzilla's Ass

Corona = Watered-Down Drippings of Infected Chihuahua Penis

Heineken = Diluted Pilsner Urquell Mixed With Giraffe Spit

Yuengling = Semi-Clear Liquid Extracted From Yak Colon During Stressful Bout Of Diarrhea

Our biggest sellers are (in no particular order):

Heineken

Amstel Light

Sam Adams

Sam Adams Light

Michelob

Michelob Light

Budweiser

Bud Light

Miller Genuine Draft

Miller Lite

Corona

Corona Light

Yuengling Lager

Rolling Rock

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

Dominion Lager

Becks

St. Pauli Girl

Red Hook

Pilsner Urquell

I personally try to sell a good bit of Mendocino Brewing Company products (Red Tail Ale, Blue Heron Ale, etc..) Dogfish Head, and the seasonal beers that we have.

Edited by Joe Riley

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Our biggest sellers are (in no particular order):

Heineken

Amstel Light

Sam Adams

Sam Adams Light

Michelob

Michelob Light

Budweiser

Bud Light

Miller Genuine Draft

Miller Lite

Corona

Corona Light

Yuengling Lager

Rolling Rock

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

Dominion Lager

Becks

St. Pauli Girl

Red Hook

Pilsner Urquell

There is a serious Starbucks-like residual effect going on with a lot of these beers: people are still deluding themselves and clinging to the ever-so-faint memory of them once being decent.

"Yuengling isn't that bad."

"Sierra Nevada is still pretty good."

"Dominion Lager is solid local beer."

"Sam Adams is still craft brewed."

Bzzt. Wrong! They ALL suck! Every single last bloody suck-assed one of them. Twenty years ago, Pilsner Urquell and Sierra Nevada were great. Sam Adams and Dominion Lager were still good ten years ago. Now they're not much better than Michelob, any more than Vie de France is better than shithole Taco Bell.

Note in particular to Old Dominion Brewing Company: you ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

Cheers,

Rocks.

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I still like Pilsner Urquell.

The real problem lies in buying it where it hasn't been sitting on the shelf for months.

Can't really argue with the other ones -- most of them weren't any good to start with.

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I still like Pilsner Urquell.

Afraid my misguided countrymen at SAB have already done quite a bit to poison that well. Despite vowing they wouldn't shift production out of Pilsen, they now have (to Poland, then Russia) and I'd swear they're screwing with the recipe, too.

Happily Czechvar (aka Budvar) still tastes like it's supposed to. Unhappily, its distribution stinks.

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Afraid my misguided countrymen at SAB have already done quite a bit to poison that well. Despite vowing they wouldn't shift production out of Pilsen, they now have (to Poland, then Russia) and I'd swear they're screwing with the recipe, too.

Happily Czechvar (aka Budvar) still tastes like it's supposed to. Unhappily, its distribution stinks.

I didn't even know that SAB had bought PU. Maybe they'll start making it at Miller plants in the US. :lol:

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Rocks, I think you are full of shit. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, to my mind, is one of the best large volume beers out there. When you need some beers to drink while eating nachos and watching a football game, it ain't bad.

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Rocks, I think you are full of shit.  Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, to my mind, is one of the best large volume beers out there.  When you need some beers to drink while eating nachos and watching a football game, it ain't bad.

While he may still be full of shit... It has been a while since I have had a Bass Ale. Has it gotten that bad?

Lately I have been sticking to the Dogfish offerings.

eta: I have to read more carefully.

Edited by mdt

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"Sierra Nevada is still pretty good."

"Dominion Lager is solid local beer."

"Sam Adams is still craft brewed."

Bzzt.  Wrong!  They ALL suck!  Every single last bloody suck-assed one of them.  Twenty years ago, Pilsner Urquell and Sierra Nevada were great. 

Cheers,

Rocks.

Nope, I think Don is saying Sierra Nevada sucks. I haven't had on in years. I havne't had an Anchor Steam either except on tap at Swann's Oyster Bar in SF, and it was outstanding still. However, I won't vouch for my critical thinking under those particular circumstances.

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I find Dogfish Head beers to be, on the whole, unbalanced. Many of them are too sweet as well.

Dominion's beers are pedestrian, sure, but Tuppers ale on the engine, decent pub food, nice people, and wi-fi still make it a common stop for me.

Sierra is metallic, which suggests to me that in the current environment of small-batch hop monster beers, Sierra is getting culled hops.

Of the normal (read, available in 12oz bottles) beer out there, I'm a big fan of Allagash white, North Coast Scrimshaw pils, Ipswich ale (New England only), Deschutes Bachelor ESB (PNW only), the newer bottled Guinness (which hits the spot despite being macro), and....

and....

and....

on a hot, hot, hot summer day, so hot your golf cart momentum provides no cooling, so hot you could fry an egg on Yul Brynner, and only when you're not making putts and you can't figure out whether your next drive will be a chattering hook or just a yucky hook....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

Michelob Light. Not Ultra, not regular. It's actually kinda hoppy.

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Nope, I think Don is saying Sierra Nevada sucks.  I haven't had on in years.  I havne't had an Anchor Steam either except on tap at Swann's Oyster Bar in SF, and it was outstanding still.  However, I won't vouch for my critical thinking under those particular circumstances.

It does suck, but it may be the least-worst beer on Joe's list (I can't remember having a Red Hook in quite awhile, so I can't say for sure). Anchor Steam is another beer that was great twenty years ago but is now just awful.

I don't mean to be such a grump, but when places like Clipper City are turning out such a wonderful product, it's hard to give these other places - long since living off their past reputations - a free pass.

Cheers,

Rocks

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I enjoy Amstel Light sometimes when I'm thirsty, Miller High Life at Firefly, Duffs at Moe's Tavern, the residual sugar at the bottome of my bad bad bad coffee cup from Starbucks. I'm a big phoney. I do not like McDonald's, though.

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I find Dogfish Head beers to be, on the whole, unbalanced.  Many of them are too sweet as well.
I had my first Dogfish last week. I had a mixed 6-pack of 60 minute IPA and the Shelter Pale Ale. I found them both to be incredibly good and those six bottle were not unbalanced. If it were easier to find I would drink it more often, but since I am usually picking up beer at Safeway (especially when my wife is paying), I have to choose what is on the shelf. For me it is usually a choice between Pacifico, Harp, and Red Stripe.

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It does suck, but it may be the least-worst beer on Joe's list (I can't remember having a Red Hook in quite awhile, so I can't say for sure).

I'll take a Sierra over a Red Hook any day.

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I'll take a Sierra over a Red Hook any day.

I find both Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and Redhook ESB to be quite drinkable. Given that the places you usually find these beers are in a vast sea of Miller and A-B products, they are a welcome find.

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This thread has me thinking of the Beer Cooler Dance, or BCD.

It's what is happening when you see a guy shuffling back and forth in front of a beer cooler, occassionally picking up some brew and then putting it back down. This dance is caused by the following situation -- for whatever reason you are not near a reputable provider of fermented barley and hops and so stop in the one place you can see with a beer sign in the window. Amidst the BudLight, Bud, MGD, High Life, Natural Light, and Keystone there are 4-6 packs of Sierra/Sam Adams. As case after case of Bud cans flies off the shelves it becomes apparent that those 4 lonely six packs have been there for some time.

Now the introduction of dating on some beers have cut down on incidences of the BCD, but as there are some brands with missing/incoherent dating systems, the dance still exists.

How old exactly are those beers? Can't be too old. So pick up a sixer and start heading toward the register. Noticing the amount of dust on it, return it to the cooler and start looking around.

Well, maybe it's not THAT old. Glance furtively at the 4 lonely sixers and slowly shuffle over and pick a different one up. Hold while gazing over other selections once again.

This usually goes on for 3-5 minutes. To the victim it seems an eternity.

The inevitable result is that the victim buys the desired beer despite its dubious age, only to be forced to dump the sixer after the first sip and renew their quest.

Edited by JPW

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This thread has me thinking of the Beer Cooler Dance, or BCD.

It's what is happening when you see a guy shuffling back and forth in front of a beer cooler, occassionally picking up some brew and then putting it back down. This dance is caused by the following situation -- for whatever reason you are not near a reputable provider of fermented barley and hops and so stop in the one place you can see with a beer sign in the window. Amidst the BudLight, Bud, MGD, High Life, Natural Light, and Keystone there are 4-6 packs of Sierra/Sam Adams. As case after case of Bud cans flies off the shelves it becomes apparent that those 4 lonely six packs have been there for some time.

Now the introduction of dating on some beers have cut down on incidences of the BCD, but as there are some brands with missing/incoherent dating systems, the dance still exists.

How old exactly are those beers? Can't be too old. So pick up a sixer and start heading toward the register. Noticing the amount of dust on it, return it to the cooler and start looking around.

Well, maybe it's not THAT old. Glance furtively at the 4 lonely sixers and slowly shuffle over and pick a different one up. Hold while gazing over other selections once again.

This usually goes on for 3-5 minutes. To the victim it seems an eternity.

The inevitable result is that the victim buys the desired beer despite it's dubious age, only to be forced to dump the sixer after the first sip and renew their quest.

There was an interesting article in the Weekend Section of the Wall Street Journal recently that showed how to decode the date stamp on about 2 dozen brands of mass produced beer. An interesting read, but since each brand does something different, you'd have to take that primer with you each time you go beer shopping.

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Now the introduction of dating on some beers have cut down on incidences of the BCD, but as there are some brands with missing/incoherent dating systems, the dance still exists.

How old exactly are those beers? Can't be too old. So pick up a sixer and start heading toward the register. Noticing the amount of dust on it, return it to the cooler and start looking around.

That reminds me, last month the WSJ had an awesome piece with graphics that helped to crack the code of sell by dates on beer (they are all a little different). Of course, you cannot read the WSJ online, but I found this link to the graphic for your enjoyment. Pretty, right?

PS: I never read. Sorry Crescent Fresh, great minds do drink/think alike...

Edited by Meaghan

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When I was growing up, we referred to America's favorite beer as "Budvasser"-- in Yiddish, it means "bathwater."  :lol:

Zora, I'm going to shamelessly steal that - thanks! :huh:

Note in particular to Old Dominion Brewing Company:  you ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

You want Jerry Bailey's phone number? I'm here to serve :)

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It's been a while since I've tried the Clipper City offerings, they started out strong about 15 years ago (as did deGroens) and then went south. I'll have to try again.

River Horse IPA has been the house swill of choice as of late. On a hot summer day, after cutting the grass, nothing beats an ice cold long-neck Bud.

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Zora, I'm going to shamelessly steal that - thanks!  :lol:

You want Jerry Bailey's phone number?  I'm here to serve  :huh:

and we refer to it as "buttwiper"

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I find Dogfish Head beers to be, on the whole, unbalanced.  Many of them are too sweet as well.

I can't make up my mind about Dogfish. Is it possible that there's batch/bottle variation going on, 'cause I've gone off and on and off both the Shelter and the 60 Minute IPA in the last few years? I'm drinking a 60 Minute now, and it's taking names. But sometimes it's borderline treacley, for sure.

Some others in the rotation: Founder's Centennial, Two Brothers Saison and a Munich Helles kick -- Hacker-Pschorr, Hofbrau Original, Ayinger Jahrhundert. Thank God for Joe at Julio's.

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Clearly, the Shelter and 60-min are the smallest offenders. But the 90-min, Indian Brown, Raison d'Etre, Chicory Stout, and all the weird ones I've tried from them are, as you so journalistically put it, treacly.

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Rocks, I think you are full of shit.  Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, to my mind, is one of the best large volume beers out there.  When you need some beers to drink while eating nachos and watching a football game, it ain't bad.

Agreed. And I still like Anchor Steam too.

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Afraid my misguided countrymen at SAB have already done quite a bit to poison that well. Despite vowing they wouldn't shift production out of Pilsen, they now have (to Poland, then Russia) and I'd swear they're screwing with the recipe, too.

Happily Czechvar (aka Budvar) still tastes like it's supposed to. Unhappily, its distribution stinks.

If you can find it try Herald I know that have it at Iota in Arlington

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The original Budweiser hails from Vienna and is still brewed there, an entirely different taste sensation.

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The original Budweiser hails from Vienna and is still brewed there, an entirely different taste sensation.

OK other than the wrong city in the wrong country you are right it is a wonderful beer. It is from the city of Budweis in the Bohemia region of the Czeh Republic.

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If you can find it try Herald I know that have it at Iota in Arlington

I am under the impression that the Herald brewery is actually owned by an Arlingtonian. I think the beer dude at Arrowine told me that many moons ago. It surely would explain its fairly strong presence in the area.

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OK other than the wrong city in the wrong country you are right it is a wonderful beer.  It is from the city of Budweis in the Bohemia region of the Czeh Republic.

Budweiser/Budvar is sold as Czechvar in the U.S. for copyright reasons. IMHO it's not really that special, but I'm not the biggest lager fan.

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Budweiser/Budvar is sold as Czechvar in the U.S. for copyright reasons.  IMHO it's not really that special, but I'm not the biggest lager fan.

It isn't that special, and I guarantee it's not the same as what you get overseas.

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It isn't that special, and I guarantee it's not the same as what you get overseas.

I have to agree, I have had the original while in Prague, and have had Czechvar, and found them to be as different as night and day. I would not pay for a Cezhvar, but I would most definately go out of my way for a Czech Budweiser.

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...Miller Lite tastes great AND is less filling... that tasteless swill they call beer. 

Hey MG,

Some of us enjoy Miller Lite BECAUSE it is tasteless! Who would have iced tea or water when alcohol could be involved? <_<

Swill...hardly. Tasteless, refreshing beverage is more like it!

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Hey MG,

Some of us enjoy Miller Lite BECAUSE it is tasteless!  Who would have iced tea or water when alcohol could be involved? <_<

Swill...hardly.  Tasteless, refreshing beverage is more like it!

That's what Keystone is for!

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A previous "taco bell guilty pleasure" post inspired this:

While I do enjoy "good" beer, one of my guilty pleasures while traveling (in the States) is sampling the local or regional swill beer. This is beer that makes Miller Lite taste like a Guinness, and doesn't have the PBR "hipster" appeal. Of course its more the novelty of the whole thing, as I get the most pleasure out of finding those brews (1) whose name is inherently funny; (2) whose first gulp makes me look like I just drank a gallon of paint. Its interesting to me that a handful of crappy beers couldn't satisfy the whole nation, and beers like Old Style, Blatz, and Natty Bo still have their followers. Anybody else enjoy these regional crappy brews? What other lesser-known crap beers are out there?

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A previous "taco bell guilty pleasure" post inspired this:

While I do enjoy "good" beer, one of my guilty pleasures while traveling (in the States) is sampling the local or regional swill beer. This is beer that makes Miller Lite taste like a Guinness, and doesn't have the PBR "hipster" appeal. Of course its more the novelty of the whole thing, as I get the most pleasure out of finding those brews (1) whose name is inherently funny; (2) whose first gulp makes me look like I just drank a gallon of paint. Its interesting to me that a handful of crappy beers couldn't satisfy the whole nation, and beers like Old Style, Blatz, and Natty Bo still have their followers. Anybody else enjoy these regional crappy brews? What other lesser-known crap beers are out there?

Black Label, Olympia, Bohemian.....although these taste more like water than a gallon of paint....

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Iron City. (aka Iron Shitty or just plain Ahrn)

One of the nastiest brews around, but every time I'm back home in Pittsburgh I have to drink one.

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Iron City. (aka Iron Shitty or just plain Ahrn)

One of the nastiest brews around, but every time I'm back home in Pittsburgh I have to drink one.

Yes - perhaps nostalgia is another reason for my enjoyment. Drinking this stuff makes me think of college, fishing, baseball games, etc...

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Iron City. (aka Iron Shitty or just plain Ahrn)

One of the nastiest brews around, but every time I'm back home in Pittsburgh I have to drink one.

I recently spotted single bottles of Iron City at the Whole Foods in Clarendon......

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I enjoy this stuff traveling abroad too: Tusker in Kenya, Kingfisher in India, Beliken in Belize, Cristal in Peru, Nile Special in Uganda, Angkor in Cambodia... and on and on. Every tropical, developing nation has its own yellow beer that is cheap, not tasty--but not offensive--and drunk regularly. Not much switching up to be done. But it, like water, generally goes well with the food.

One word of warning: in Thailand, treat yourself and upgrade from the bottom-of-the-barrel Chang to Tiger. They essentially taste the same, but at least with Tiger you don't get the formaldehyde headache.

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I recently spotted single bottles of Iron City at the Whole Foods in Clarendon......
Ted's Montana Grill has it on the menu.

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I enjoy this stuff traveling abroad too: Tusker in Kenya, Kingfisher in India, Beliken in Belize, Cristal in Peru, Nile Special in Uganda, Angkor in Cambodia... and on and on. Every tropical, developing nation has its own yellow beer that is cheap, not tasty--but not offensive--and drunk regularly. Not much switching up to be done. But it, like water, generally goes well with the food.

One word of warning: in Thailand, treat yourself and upgrade from the bottom-of-the-barrel Chang to Tiger. They essentially taste the same, but at least with Tiger you don't get the formaldehyde headache.

...and Pilsen and Imperial (I think) in Costa Rica.

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Man, that's a toughie. There isn't really THAT much factory beer that I'd classify as pure swill; a lot of local brews simply reflect a predilection for weak flavor, or just plain cheapness. In many cases, I'd rather drink a reliably made watery beer than a bizarre, wildly-variable, hand-crafted microbrew. So, ditching the "crappy" label for a second and just focusing on non-micro regionals:

Rolling Rock, but only if it's in a smoke-filled blues hall.

Leinenkugel Red anywhere near the Twin Cities.

Shiner Bock, of course.

LaBatt's or Sleeman's in eastern Canada

Blackened Voodoo lager.

Wasn't a fan of Old Style, and I can't stand Genessee or Little Kings.

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Rolling Rock, but only if it's in a smoke-filled blues hall.
Rock doesn't count anymore. Not only had it been owned by one of the big European companies for a while, but it is now owned by Anheuser Busch which is shutting down the Latrobe brewery and moving all operations to someplace around Philly.

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And another:

Gennesee Cream Ale

Hey, I went to college in Brockport, NY (pronounced Braak-port) where we drank oceans of Genny Cream. $1.99 a six-pack. You couldn't beat it.

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Leinenkugel Red anywhere near the Twin Cities.
Would that be the twin cities of Chippewa Falls, and Eau Claire Wisconsin? I sure hope you are not trying to attribute a fine Wisconsin brew to the city that hosts the nasty and vile Vikings. OK, calling it fine might be a stretch, but definately drinkable.

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Hey, I went to college in Brockport, NY (pronounced Braak-port) where we drank oceans of Genny Cream. $1.99 a six-pack. You couldn't beat it.
Up in Clinton, NY, Genny Cream was ever-present, as was Utica Club. Gotta love Shultz and Dooley!

Fort Schuyler was by far the worst beer available in the area, though. 75 cents a glass, in 1999!

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"My beer, is Rheingold, the dry beer".

And is Old Dutch still around?

Thanks,

Kevin

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Would that be the twin cities of Chippewa Falls, and Eau Claire Wisconsin? I sure hope you are not trying to attribute a fine Wisconsin brew to the city that hosts the nasty and vile Vikings. OK, calling it fine might be a stretch, but definately drinkable.
Absolutely, Sthitch. A few years ago at a meat and cheese store in northern Wisconsin (yes, a meat and cheese store, bless 'em), I saw a summer sausage shaped like a Leinie's bottle, label and all. I still regret not buying it.

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Blatz

Is beer still being produced under the "Blatz" name? Blatz used to be a national brand (the first of the Milwaukee brewers to go national, in fact). There's a long, strange-ish chronology of Blatz HERE. It's unclear, though, if any beer is still being sold under the name; if so, it would appear that it's being brewed by Miller under contract to Pabst, which has owned the Blatz name two different times.

Blatz was the sponsor of the Amos 'n' Andy television show; I don't know about the radio show.

"I'm from Milwaukee and I oughtta know

It's Blatz, Blatz, Blatz, Blatz wherever you go!

Blatz is the name you will always hear.

Blatz is Milwaukee's finest beer!"

They don't write 'em like that any more.

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... and I can't stand Genessee or Little Kings.

Little Kings taste like paperclips.

In college in Chicago we shunned Old Style in favor of Hamm's.

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Hey, I went to college in Brockport, NY (pronounced Braak-port) where we drank oceans of Genny Cream. $1.99 a six-pack. You couldn't beat it.

It was also the honored guest at the first keg party I ever threw in my dorm room freshman year in Meadville, PA.

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When I was in college in Boston, the standard cheap crappy beer of choice was Narragansett, generally known as Gansett. There was a bar/restaurant up in Allston much frequented by BU yahoos known by the endearing name The El Phoenix Room. It was ostensibly a Mexican restaurant ( hence the "El"), but mostly people went there because they had $0.05 drafts (every night!). I actually don't remember what they had on tap, but it was probably Gansett. The food was terrible.

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"Schlitz. No Schlitz ? Blatz. No Blatz ? Improvise." - Lt Colonel Frank Slade USA(Retired)

Hoo-ah!!!

Kevin

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And another:

Gennesee Cream Ale

I went to undergrad in Rochester (where Genny is brewed) Cream Ale is bad, but nowhere near as bad as Genny Ice

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Old Milwaukee was the go-to beer in central NY in the mid 80s. While it was swill and it was cheap, drinking it allowed us to sneer at the rubes imbibing Milwaukee's Be(a)st. Mickey's Big Mouth just plain scared us. When you were drinking classy, it was St. Pauli's Girl (strictly because the accompanying picture of the comely beer maiden) or Heineken.

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In college, it was always Schaefer or Olympia ("It's (the) Water"). A 12-pack of Oly was (and still may be) cheaper than a 12-pack of Coke. :)

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Is beer still being produced under the "Blatz" name? Blatz used to be a national brand (the first of the Milwaukee brewers to go national, in fact). There's a long, strange-ish chronology of Blatz HERE. It's unclear, though, if any beer is still being sold under the name; if so, it would appear that it's being brewed by Miller under contract to Pabst, which has owned the Blatz name two different times.

Blatz was the sponsor of the Amos 'n' Andy television show; I don't know about the radio show.

"I'm from Milwaukee and I oughtta know

It's Blatz, Blatz, Blatz, Blatz wherever you go!

Blatz is the name you will always hear.

Blatz is Milwaukee's finest beer!"

They don't write 'em like that any more.

I had Blatz in a can this summer at a bar in Michigan, but that doesn't necessarily mean they they still brew it - it could've been sitting around for years.

When I was in college in Boston, the standard cheap crappy beer of choice was Narragansett, generally known as Gansett. There was a bar/restaurant up in Allston much frequented by BU yahoos known by the endearing name The El Phoenix Room. It was ostensibly a Mexican restaurant ( hence the "El"), but mostly people went there because they had $0.05 drafts (every night!). I actually don't remember what they had on tap, but it was probably Gansett. The food was terrible.

Never had Narragansett, but when I was in Boston we drank Brubaker (which I think had a "patriot" on the label); often at Our House or MaryAnns - places not too far from the now-extinct El Phoenix Room, I believe.

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Milwaukee's Best, "The Beast", was the cheapo stuff when I was in college here in DC at GW in the 80s, but I don't think it was regional. Cheaper than soda, most of the time. An enterprising fraternity at the University of Florida emptied the soda machine, and replaced the selection with Beast...

I also remember Keystone Light (a Coors product, slogan something like "bottled beer in a can"), but I think that one also was national.

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Old Milwaukee was the go-to beer in central NY in the mid 80s.
I'm happy to report that as of 2000, this was still the case. $7.99 per case (bottles), to be exact, Old Mil regular, light, and ice. Ah, Hamilton...

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Here's a crappy beer story for you.

Way back in about 1989, I was drafted to plan and execute the company picnic. One day my boss walks into the lab and we start talking beer. With a tiny budget, I was sweating over what to buy. Doesn't matter so long as there's plenty of it, was his response. Get seven cases of Milwaukee's Best.

This devolved into an argument over whether it was even humanly possible to tell the difference between Budweiser and Miller. I said yes, he said no. He said that if he poured ten samples I wouldn't be able to distinguish which was which. I bet him I could.

That bet became the big entertainment at the picnic.

The mutually agreed-upon conditions were as follows: ten samples of beer, with no fewer than two and no more than eight being of one type (so, not necessarily five of each). Samples to be determined by random number generator, and poured by co-workers. Further, I had to get at least eight of them right - we agreed that the test would not be statistically significant below that threshold.

On wager were two six-packs: he brought his favorite, I brought mine. (I think one of them was a Samuel Smith's product.)

The time came, the whole damn plant crowded around to cheer me on (Bossman was not very popular).

The result? I was able to tell. Eight times. I got two wrong.

What I never admitted to the boss, though, was that after the first three I was guessing. 'Cause after a few swigs it just don't matter any more.

Same is true for Coke and Pepsi, btw. :) Your taste buds get blown out after a few sips. Well, mine do, anyway.

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Ok, the crappiest beer we've every tried and to this date, the only beer my husband could not finish, was a smoked beer we tried up at Blob's Park. One person at the table made comment "It smells like Bacon!" and it did.

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Shiner Bock, of course.

Yummmm, Shiner. Much more a fan of the Bock than the Heffe, but I'll take either. Can it be called regional still though? I started drinking it around 6-7 years ago when I was in Texas for a week where it's pretty much everywhere (or was in San Antonio). However, it's in a large number of grocery stores even here in DC as well as points in between Texas and DC. Haven't really looked for it too much outside of that region though so not sure how wide-spread it is.

But yeah, not crappy at all.

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Would that be the twin cities of Chippewa Falls, and Eau Claire Wisconsin? I sure hope you are not trying to attribute a fine Wisconsin brew to the city that hosts the nasty and vile Vikings. OK, calling it fine might be a stretch, but definately drinkable.

Point taken; I know Leinie is from Wisconsin, but:

  • I haven't spent as much time in northern WI as in MN
  • what else are you gonna drink in MN?

(and dang...the midwest is far more territorial than I thought!)

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Point taken; I know Leinie is from Wisconsin, but:
  • I haven't spent as much time in northern WI as in MN
  • what else are you gonna drink in MN?

(and dang...the midwest is far more territorial than I thought!)

Since I am from Wisconsin the answer is easy, if I had to spend anytime in Minnesota my drink of choice would be arsenic. :)

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Ok, the crappiest beer we've every tried and to this date, the only beer my husband could not finish, was a smoked beer we tried up at Blob's Park. One person at the table made comment "It smells like Bacon!" and it did.

Must have been DeGroen's Rauchbock-- that was good stuff! Definitely an acquired taste, though.

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Point taken; I know Leinie is from Wisconsin, but:
And now you mention Point beer from Stevens Point, WI, another cheap but likeable brew. You're all over the central Wisconsin map, Dave!

And speaking of Leinie's, this from yesterday's Post article on beer at RFK:

"RFK even offered a brand that I've seen nowhere else in Washington: Home Run Ale , dispensed at the former Foggy Bottom bar on the ground level behind home plate. This sweet, grainy, copper-colored ale was selling at $5.50 for a 16-ounce cup, a buck less than the other craft beer selections. Home Run Ale comes from Leinenkugel's 10th Street Brewery in Milwaukee, where it's officially known as "Special Ale." The brewery sells it to accounts across its 26-state marketing area, which can then slap their own moniker on the tap marker to create their own house brand."

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And now you mention Point beer from Stevens Point, WI, another cheap but likeable brew. You're all over the central Wisconsin map, Dave!
Point is much better than it used to be. Even back to when my father was young, it was the cheap beer of choice for him and his friends. Other than the light version, it is definately a better beer than it was when I was younger. But we used to drink Heileman's Special Export, which strangly was never exported out of the upper midwest.

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Back in college, the locally-brewed cheap beer of choice was Stoney's. Brewed in Smithton, PA (before the brewery closed in 2001 and Pittsburgh Brewing started producing it), it was $1/bottle at the bar.

IM384328.gif

I once picked up a case of Straub Beer, from St. Mary's PA. A typical example of the style.

frontbottles.gif

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when I was living in san fran 94, sharing a 1 bedroom apt w/ 7 other irish students, the tipple of choice was Meister Brau....$4.99 for a 12 pack of cans :)

I enjoy this stuff traveling abroad too: Tusker in Kenya, Kingfisher in India, Beliken in Belize, Cristal in Peru, Nile Special in Uganda, Angkor in Cambodia... and on and on. Every tropical, developing nation has its own yellow beer that is cheap, not tasty--but not offensive--and drunk regularly.

Stella (not that Stella) and Saqqara in Egypt......after a long day at the office an ice cold Stella went down a treat

boozer13.jpg

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Sportz beer- a classic from the people who brought you Pabst Blue Ribbon.

Old Dutch is still around. Can't remember where I saw it.

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when I was living in san fran 94, sharing a 1 bedroom apt w/ 7 other irish students, the tipple of choice was Meister Brau....$4.99 for a 12 pack of cans :)
Once while home for the summer during college I was in a bodega on the UES - a guy walks in, grabs three 12'ers of Miester Brau, looks at me and said "Hey Man, no budget, no beer". I still laugh thinking about that - and the fact that I immediately dropped whatever 12'er I had and picked up the 'Brau.

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Yummmm, Shiner. Much more a fan of the Bock than the Heffe, but I'll take either. Can it be called regional still though? I started drinking it around 6-7 years ago when I was in Texas for a week where it's pretty much everywhere (or was in San Antonio). However, it's in a large number of grocery stores even here in DC as well as points in between Texas and DC. Haven't really looked for it too much outside of that region though so not sure how wide-spread it is.

But yeah, not crappy at all.

We had the Heffe on tap for a bit last summer. Our cheap beer of choice in college was Natty Ice. You really had to figure in alchohol content vs. dollar spent. It was definitely the most drunk you could get off of the pennies you found under the couch cushions. At least until we discovered steel reserve.

I have enough crappy beer stories from my college rugby days that still make me gag a bit. The cheapest beer we ever had was when we played Temple. They took us to some liquor store near the team house (I was scanning the sidewalk for chalk outlines) and we bought a bunch of cases of this beer with an Indian Head on the can. A couple of my teammates were wondering aloud how much they were per beer and it seems the temple guys had figured it out already because one of them said .29 cents almost immediately.

The worst was Hamms on our way down to Florida. I do have to qualify that though because I haven't really tried it as the manufacturer intended. They were room temperature and we had no way to cool them down but it was spring break and we wanted to get drunk quick so we just started drinking them anyways.

Well someone's logic was in the right place, because it was suggested that since they were so horrible to drink anyways we might as well dump a shot of vodka (cheap plastic Tenley Brand 100 proof) in each one so at least we would get drunk faster. It tasted awful. However a couple of those and you were good to go. Granted you were also fighting nauseau but eventually it turned into an extremely crazy night.

The last, which is so bad I didn't even think it fit in the category of worst beer, is the time we were having a post game drink up at (I think) the John Hopkins rugby house and ran out of beer. The party was still young and someone was sent to the store but we all knew it was going to be 30-45 minutes until they returned. The only alternative? The 3/4 of a keg left over from a party about a month ago that had been sitting in the backyard (this was sometime in September mind you). There were some naysayers but most of us agreed to give it a go and some idiot had suggested it might even be better because it had "aged". It had the consistency and taste of clarified butter that had some skunked stale beer dumped into it. Not pleasant. Yet sadly we still almost kicked the thing before the beer run got back.

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Well, if we're just going for cheap beer...

Old Knickerbocker $4.29 a case after tax (late '80s).

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Little Kings taste like paperclips.
Say it ain't so! "Little Kings Cream Ale, it's too good to be beer" was their jingle. I used to see bottles littered around residential construction sites in KY in the late 70s.

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Would that be the twin cities of Chippewa Falls, and Eau Claire Wisconsin? I sure hope you are not trying to attribute a fine Wisconsin brew to the city that hosts the nasty and vile Vikings. OK, calling it fine might be a stretch, but definately drinkable.
Since when are Eau Claire and Chippewa (pronounced Chip Wa) Falls (where Lineys come from) considered twin cities.

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Wiedemann Beer ... a six pack and a box of mac and cheese (store brand, Kraft was too expensive)

a complete 7 course meal for under 2 dollars.

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Big Bear Malt Liquor $1.55 a 40, two of those was a good night of drinking

Our Yammy Board* in college was sponsored by Busch Lite Draft (which came in a can)

We use to go to a bar that had Genny Cream Ale for 25 cents a glass...it use to be served in the those little plastic diner OJ cups

*Yammy Board was our year long tally on who in our dorm puked the most.

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Re: Iron City

Ted's Montana Grill has it on the menu.

Rustico had it on tap last time I was there. There's definitely something to be said for these beers, if only for the nostalgia making them enjoyable. Hard to get nostalgic about miller lite. Me, I get nostalgic about the first time I had Aventinus, or my first Old Rasputin.

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"My beer is Rheingold, the dry beer. Think of Rheingold whenever you buy beer. It’s refreshing, not sweet. It’s the extra dry treat. Won’t you try extra dry Rheingold beer?"

We're back. And on the mound now for the Mets, Tug McGraw, who's looking to put down Willie McCovey.

Rheingold, btw, was not crappy beer. Even it's brief rebirth in the early 1990's was thirst-quenching, cheap, and I was happy to mow the lawn on a six pack. :)

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mmmm, i love me some regional beer, especially at ballgames. natty-boh, old style, iron city, oly (although, i don't think they make that anymore), rainier, pearl, lone star. . if you go a step up, you have shiner, henry weinhardts. . .

growing up, we used to have lucky lager. . .came 12 to a cardboard box. . .even found a place that was still selling blatz. in college, we found sportz (cheesy sporting picture on the box and all).

however, i think there needs to be some distinctions made between local and crappy nationwide beer, such as. . .milwaukee's best can be found nationwide, but, can you find, say natty-boh outside of the baltimore city limits? does it really matter? i mean, there is nationwide derision for natural light, but what if natural light was only available in a portion of the u.s., does that give it instant cred?

there are those unique, minor named beers that you can still find in the corners of your local safeway like schaefer or black label (oooh, that one night at chief ike's. . .). they are indeed crappy beer, but are they regional crappy beer?

oh, and whoever brought up keystone. . .it's america's least bitter beer!!!

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mmmm, i love me some regional beer, especially at ballgames. natty-boh, old style, iron city, oly (although, i don't think they make that anymore), rainier, pearl, lone star. . if you go a step up, you have shiner, henry weinhardts. . .
I'm glad someone finally mentioned Rainier (AKA The Green Death), which is now brewed by Pabst, I believe. My favorite Rainier Ale varietal is the 24 oz. can- best consumed rather quickly, so as to avoid even a hint of warming. Old style can be great, but only when consumed in a total dive in Chicago where the bartender is so drunk that he asks you crank call his friends and subsequently moons all of his patrons. :)

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Big Bear Malt Liquor $1.55 a 40, two of those was a good night of drinking

$1.55? We used to get Magnum malt liquor for $0.99/bottle. The local store used to see us coming and even offered us a case discount on occasion :) . With tax I think it was $10.83. Good lord that stuff was nasty.

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Re: Iron City

Rustico had it on tap last time I was there.

It's a tap that won't go away...right next to the Miller Lite actually. It's one of our happy hour drafts (sells for next to nothing, go figure). There's also the option of the beer buckets - which seems absolutely appropriate for this thread:

Workingman’s Lunchbox

Five beers that made America famous!

Coors Original, Schlitz, Schaefer, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Miller High Life

Frat Party

Busch, Natural Light, Milwaukee’s Best, Coors Light, Keystone Light

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Frat Party

Busch, Natural Light, Milwaukee’s Best, Coors Light, Keystone Light

It's not a frat party without Yuengling. :)

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It's not a frat party without Yuengling. :)
The buckets are limited to 5 cans...which would you sub out?

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The buckets are limited to 5 cans...which would you sub out?
All of them. What have you on cask tonight? :)

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It's not a frat party without Yuengling. :)
Only when they're trying to class it up that night. IMVHO, high life's the way to go if you're playing beirut, because the ping pong balls sometimes bounce off of the chunky foam. :lol:

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I remember Knickerbocker - $0.99/six-pack downm in the tidewater area of Virginia in the mid '80's.

I also remember Blatz - $1.99/six-pack in the late '80's. I bought it at Giant. Some friend of mine thought it tasted like Heineken (!!!) Obviously, I cut him off for overindulgence.

Does anyone have any fond memories of Carling Black Label? :)

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I remember Knickerbocker - $0.99/six-pack downm in the tidewater area of Virginia in the mid '80's.

I also remember Blatz - $1.99/six-pack in the late '80's. I bought it at Giant. Some friend of mine thought it tasted like Heineken (!!!) Obviously, I cut him off for overindulgence.

Does anyone have any fond memories of Carling Black Label? :)

I have memories of Carling Black Label, but they are not fond.

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I have memories of Carling Black Label, but they are not fond.
That's the smile of the week.

When I first went to Town Hall in College Park, Md. you could get a 16 oz. Black Label, in a returnable bottle, for 65 cents. After five of those, every girl in the place looked like Mabel :) .

Kevin

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I now remember that the slang for Carling Black Label was "Black Labs".

The only black Lab that I want anything to do with sleeps on my bed at night and chases tennis balls in her sleep :)

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