mdt

Rabbit

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I have a whole rabbit in my freezer that I plan on cooking this weekend. What I don't have is any good ideas on how to prepare it so I am asking for your $0.02.

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Confit the legs like you would duck. Nice with thyme and orange peel.

Do not bother with rack of bunny. I had it as a garnish on a rabbit dish once in NY and it was amusing, but who has time to french those tiny bones?

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Confit the legs like you would duck. Nice with thyme and orange peel.

Do not bother with rack of bunny. I had it as a garnish on a rabbit dish once in NY and it was amusing, but who has time to french those tiny bones?

I hear you! I had a rack atop a rabbit crepinette at CityZen and was thinking the same thing.

Braise whole or cut up?

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Braise whole or cut up?
They're usually small enough to braise whole - white wine, mirepoix, something aromatic. Malawry's confit suggestion sounds intriguing too.

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At 2 Amys, I believe they bone it out, surround it with pancetta and roll it before roasting. Serve with a slightly savory fruit or fig compete. And given your Italianate bent and your restless quest for new experiences, I see you as someone who finds boning a rabbit a worthy challenge.

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I had a great dish in Belgium: Rabbit with prunes (the rabbit is braised in liquid - usually part Belgian beer). Google searching should turn up a recipe.

Another idea is to use the rabbit pieces in a paella.

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And given your Italianate bent and your restless quest for new experiences, I see you as someone who finds boning a rabbit a worthy challenge.
Mike never struck me as that masochistic. :) But, if you have endless patience for tiny little bones go right ahead and try it.

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I know it's not as exciting as featuring the rabbit as the main meat, but here in the height of tomato season why not make ragu di coniglio and a really good pasta?

Caveat: personally, I've just never been thrilled with rabbit as a main dish. Whether prepared in Italian, German or French styles, it's always come across to me as something that would be better if one substituted fowl or pork. YMMV.

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Mike never struck me as that masochistic. :) But, if you have endless patience for tiny little bones go right ahead and try it.

Easier than boning a quail. :lol:

It doesn't seem that hard, since your more or less scraping the meat off the outside of the ribs, neck and back, not scraping off every little one.

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I see you as someone who finds boning a rabbit a worthy challenge.

I'm taking bets on how long before Rocks posts something about this phrase.

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This recipe from epicurious looks good, too: Click
I have done this recipe many times and have gotten rave reviews. FWIW, I get my rabbits from Capitol Poultry at Eastern Market.

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Speaking of eating bunnies, Fall is fast approaching and I have resolved to make civet as soon as the weather cools. Any body out there have a lead on fresh rabbits -- or better yet, hare -- available with a side of blood, a civets traditional thickening agent?

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Speaking of eating bunnies, Fall is fast approaching and I have resolved to make civet as soon as the weather cools.
Why?

Good luck with the fresh rabbit. Maybe try Wagshals?

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Speaking of eating bunnies, Fall is fast approaching and I have resolved to make civet as soon as the weather cools. Any body out there have a lead on fresh rabbits -- or better yet, hare -- available with a side of blood, a civets traditional thickening agent?
The Lancaster Market in Germantown used to have them, and so did the Wagshal's in Spring Valley.

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Thanks for all the suggestions. I was going to confit the legs, but could not find my stash of duck fat in the freezer. I ended up doing a braise with red peppers, onion, garlic, tomato, and thyme. Served it up with some swiss chard and had a decent meal.

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I was going to confit the legs, but could not find my stash of duck fat in the freezer.
Wow, the crime emergency is really out of hand. Is nothing sacred anymore?

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A fucking basset hound-sized Zuni Cafe salt/milk cured Eco-Friendly wallet-unfriendly wascally wabbit that my wife and daugher both refused to eat on vague moral grounds, in a madeira/plum braise that was excellent. I have leftovers, if anyone's hungry.
I have one of those in the freezer. Mind sharing how you did the braise?

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A fucking basset hound-sized Zuni Cafe salt/milk cured Eco-Friendly wallet-unfriendly wascally wabbit that my wife and daugher both refused to eat on vague moral grounds, in a madeira/plum braise that was excellent. I have leftovers, if anyone's hungry.
1) Basset-hound sized

I thought most farmed rabbits were much smaller. Any explanation regarding size and/or choice of analogous critter?

2) Morality......or sentimental reasons?

3) Companion ingredients

Fresh plums from Central/South America? Home-canned and stored from the summer's harvest? Prunes? Prunes are great in braises.

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