Jump to content


Photo

Brussels Sprouts


  • Please log in to reply
42 replies to this topic

#1 shogun

shogun

    Ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts

Posted 24 September 2006 - 11:30 AM

How long do Brussels sprouts on the stalk stay fresh?
Matt Robinson

I'll have the beef car-patchio to start, and the braised lamb shank...........and a Yorkie. Buttered.

#2 zoramargolis

zoramargolis

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,780 posts

Posted 24 September 2006 - 01:57 PM

How long do Brussels sprouts on the stalk stay fresh?

Depends how they are stored. In the refrigerator, they could keep for weeks.

#3 shogun

shogun

    Ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts

Posted 24 September 2006 - 02:59 PM

Depends how they are stored. In the refrigerator, they could keep for weeks.

Really. That's good to know. Originally I wasn't going to use them tonight as planned, but I may use one branch and save the other if they'll keep well. Thanks!
Matt Robinson

I'll have the beef car-patchio to start, and the braised lamb shank...........and a Yorkie. Buttered.

#4 shogun

shogun

    Ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts

Posted 24 September 2006 - 04:41 PM

Those branches took some TIME! But I think it'll be well worth it :)

Next question: Blanch or no blanch? They're pretty small except for one or two, which I can cut. Going to be sauteeing them in bacon fat (and bacon).

Update: Sprouts were very good! Ended up having my original plan overruled in favor of doing a bacon preparation Jenn had at one point, but I got mine back by throwing in some white Balsamic vinegar (which was more or less how I was going to do them initially but without the bacon. On the other hand, what's not good with bacon?) for a light glaze. Between these and the sprouts we had at the Corduroy dinner with the venison, I don't see what the big anti-Brussel's sprout deal is!

ScotteeM: I did end up blanching them, if only to speed cooking time because I fell behind a little slash the meat finished faster than I expected and I ran out of time. These were small enough (except for a few) that it probably wouldn't have been otherwise nessesary.

Edited by shogun, 24 September 2006 - 07:25 PM.

Matt Robinson

I'll have the beef car-patchio to start, and the braised lamb shank...........and a Yorkie. Buttered.

#5 ScotteeM

ScotteeM

    Foie Gras

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,159 posts

Posted 24 September 2006 - 07:20 PM

I usually don't blanch before sauteeing in bacon/drippings, but I do usually quarter them lengthwise.

That's some good eating!

Dona Animella


#6 Mark Slater

Mark Slater

    @WinosaurusRex

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,868 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 09:29 AM

My only complaint about most brussel sprouts in restaurants is that they tend to be oily. I parboil them, toss them with herbs and a little olive oil, then throw them on a hot grill for a few minutes to crisp up.

My preferred method is to steam them and then toss with butter and soy sauce.

Beverage Manager, Bastille 1201 N. Royal St., Alexandria, VA

manager@bastillerestaurant.com

http://www.bastillerestaurant.com


#7 lperry

lperry

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,818 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 09:32 AM

Chiffonade and slowly caramelize in a wide skillet with some butter. Throw in chestnuts if you have them.

#8 slim

slim

    Rhombicuboctahedron

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 09:56 AM

I like to cut them in half and place them cut side down in a bit of oil/butter to caramelize. Then add a bit of water to steam and finish cooking.

#9 sandynva

sandynva

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 303 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 10:28 AM

my favorite way is from either julia child or martha stewar, i can't remember which.
trim and cut any large or medium size sprouts in half. boil in heavily salted water for 7-10 min, depending on size of sprout. drain and toss with a bit of butter, roast in pan covered with foil at 400 for about 10 min, then uncover and roast for an additional 10-20 min till all browned. delicious!

#10 monavano

monavano

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,245 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 10:38 AM

I roasted some brussel sprouts last night. I quartered them and put them into a roasting dish with chopped apple, thyme, apple cider, evoo and butter. Season with s&p and roast at 375 for 25 min.
I threw in pre-cooked crumbled bacon for the last 5 min. of cooking.
Overall, I liked the combination of flavors, but I think next time I will do this on the stovetop and get really good caramelization on the sprouts first. That taste is key to me.

#11 leleboo

leleboo

    Queen of Supply-Side Bonhomie Bone-Drab

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,524 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 10:40 AM

Overall, I liked the combination of flavors, but I think next time I will do this on the stovetop and get really good caramelization on the sprouts first. That taste is key to me.

For Thanksgiving I often make a dish of roasted brussels sprouts and butternut squash with sage and shallots. As long a the squash is chunked up about the size of the sprouts (halved), they tend to reach the level of roasted-ness I want from them in the same amount of time. Although I love the idea of getting some caramelization on the sprouts on the stovetop first...I might try that this year.

"He had found a Nutri-Matic machine which had provided him with a plastic cup filled with a liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea." ~THHGTTG
"Are you from the future? Do they still have sandwiches there?" ~Montgomery Scott, Star Trek
------
Leigh


#12 monavano

monavano

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,245 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 11:25 AM

For Thanksgiving I often make a dish of roasted brussels sprouts and butternut squash with sage and shallots. As long a the squash is chunked up about the size of the sprouts (halved), they tend to reach the level of roasted-ness I want from them in the same amount of time. Although I love the idea of getting some caramelization on the sprouts on the stovetop first...I might try that this year.

Which get me to thinking-I'm going to get some bacon grease and brown the sprouts in that first! :(

#13 ghostrider

ghostrider

    grouper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 12:41 PM

I love Brussels sprouts but am really atavistic with them - simmer gently till mushy, approx. 17 minutes. Serve whole, slice in half on the plate & plop way too much butter on each piece. Some consider this overcooking.

For some reason it always cracks me up when I buy frozen sprouts (outside the local season, of course) & the fine print on the bag says "Product of Belgium."

#14 FunnyJohn

FunnyJohn

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,020 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 02:28 PM

I don't know what about Brussels Sprouts I enjoy more: eating them myself (steamed and served with browned butter) or serving them to my daughter just to torture her :(

John Herzberg
Boulevardier
Bon Vivant
Besotted
Epistemological Optimist


"I would like to take you seriously, but to do so would affront your intelligence."
"You too can have the soothing feeling of nature's own baby-soft wool being pulled over your resting eyes." - Herb Block


#15 slim

slim

    Rhombicuboctahedron

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts

Posted 22 October 2009 - 03:21 PM

I love Brussels sprouts but am really atavistic with them - simmer gently till mushy, approx. 17 minutes. Serve whole, slice in half on the plate & plop way too much butter on each piece. Some consider this overcooking."

You know, I actually like them "overcooked" too...

#16 TedE

TedE

    bottom feeder

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 896 posts

Posted 26 October 2009 - 12:18 PM

A Thanksgiving staple for the past few years has been a super easy stove top method from Gourmet several years ago. First step is to brown halved or quartered sprouts over high heat in a wide pan (we use a combination butter/olive oil). Set sprouts aside. Reduce heat, caramelize shallots, add pancetta (optional, can also use chopped bacon at the end). Sprouts back into the pan, add just enough stock to cover the bottom. Cover and cook for a 3-4 minutes until sprouts are done. Toss with butter and parmesan to finish, S&P to taste.

These are the best sprouts I've ever had.

"Mmmm ... floor pie ...." - Homer Simpson


#17 synaesthesia

synaesthesia

    I <3 Bawlmer.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,527 posts

Posted 26 October 2009 - 12:33 PM

The caramelization reminds me of the Dan Barber recipe, and this weekend I combined that with the Mark Bittman recipe only with guanciale. I think I would maybe try soaking the figs in hot water though to make them a little more lively and less dried out.
Jamie

Brian: Stewie, if you don't like it, go on the internet and complain about it.

#18 deangold

deangold

    Brunello Riserva

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,978 posts

Posted 27 October 2009 - 07:50 AM

Zach of Tree and Leaf reports that his crop is two weeks away. I tasted some of the tops last Sunday.

Dean Gold ~ Chef/Owner Dino's Grotto

1914 Ninth Street NW

Metro Green/Yellow Shaw Howard or U/Cardozo

Pay Parking Lots: 7th & T ~ U between 9th & 10th

Dino's Grotto In Shaw
Dino's Grotto on Twitter
Dino's Grotto on Facebook

 


#19 Anna Blume

Anna Blume

    fruit bat

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,894 posts

Posted 27 October 2009 - 09:41 AM

As much as I love Brussels Sprouts with bacon or pancetta, let me plug the following recipes you could feed to your vegan friends: Union Square Cafe's Hashed Brussels Sprouts w Poppy Seeds (the black seeds pop transitively and intransitively--maybe, or at least literally and figuratively--when they respond to heat and effect a strong visual contrast that proves pleasing to the eye).

And adapted from the Moosewood cookbook on international dishes served at the restaurant on Sundays:

Steam B sprout halves w stubs of peeled carrots cut about one inch in length. (Recipe calls for leeks, too, but I never bother.)
While they're cooking, melt a little buter and add cider vinegar, horseradish and dillweed to taste.
Toss the vegetables in the mixture and season liberally w freshly ground pepper and a little salt.

This is called British food, and while it may sound about as tempting as mushy peas, Marmite and other ghastly foods of the fallen Empire, the odd combination is surprisingly delicious.

As for two of the best versions I've had recently, you'll have to:

a) check out the menu at Poste and see if Rob Weland is serving his side dish that includes Seckel Pears (sautéed), or
b ) buy Monica Bhide's Modern Spice. The latter is extremely creative, different, amazingly good and a great addition to Thanksgiving if you're also making a cranberry chutney.

#20 DanCole42

DanCole42

    Zinc Saucier

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,075 posts

Posted 06 November 2009 - 03:07 PM

Chiffonade and slowly caramelize in a wide skillet with some butter. Throw in chestnuts if you have them.

I've always just halved or quartered them and roasted them. Chiffonading was a new and wonderful experience. It really helps the flavors spread. It's almost like a hot coleslaw.

I browned some butter, then tossed in the chiffonaded sprouts with leek, apple, sage, then a little cider vinegar and apple cider. Delicious.

And salt and pepper.
-Dan

GChat: DanCole42

MORBO: The challenger's ugly food has shown us that even hideous things can be sweet on the inside.

#21 Rhone1998

Rhone1998

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 680 posts

Posted 08 November 2009 - 05:05 PM

I've always just halved or quartered them and roasted them. Chiffonading was a new and wonderful experience. It really helps the flavors spread. It's almost like a hot coleslaw.

I browned some butter, then tossed in the chiffonaded sprouts with leek, apple, sage, then a little cider vinegar and apple cider. Delicious.

And salt and pepper.

This is an excellent version. I used onion and thyme instead of leek and sage, and it came out great. My advice to anyone trying this is to saute the sprouts until you think they've just been browned enough, and then take a deep breath and keep going for another 5 minutes or so...it's really the deep caramelization that makes this go from good to great.

--
Dan


#22 seatwo

seatwo

    I Just Made My First Post!

  • Member
  • 1 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 09:35 AM

My new favorite (albeit SUPER rich) method of preparing brussels sprouts is to braise them in cream. The cream becomes nutty and the whole thing is addictive. Recipe is from "All About Braising" (FANTASTIC book) by Molly Stevens and is also posted on the Orangette blog.

#23 Pool Boy

Pool Boy

    DC Crüdite

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,648 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 09:54 AM

My new favorite (albeit SUPER rich) method of preparing brussels sprouts is to braise them in cream. The cream becomes nutty and the whole thing is addictive. Recipe is from "All About Braising" (FANTASTIC book) by Molly Stevens and is also posted on the Orangette blog.

Thanks for sharing this info. I love that book.

We made a Mark Bittman recipe involving bacon and dried figs recently and it was fabulous.

Food.Wine.Cats.Hawaiian Shirts.Travel.Art.Music.


#24 lperry

lperry

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,818 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:09 AM

I've always just halved or quartered them and roasted them. Chiffonading was a new and wonderful experience. It really helps the flavors spread. It's almost like a hot coleslaw.

I browned some butter, then tossed in the chiffonaded sprouts with leek, apple, sage, then a little cider vinegar and apple cider. Delicious.

And salt and pepper.

To give credit where it is due, I believe I originally saw this on Sara Moulton's old Food Network show. She said her kids would even eat them this way.

#25 synaesthesia

synaesthesia

    I <3 Bawlmer.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,527 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:33 AM

Thanks for sharing this info. I love that book.

We made a Mark Bittman recipe involving bacon and dried figs recently and it was fabulous.

I subbed dates in last night. Even better than the figs... esp. with the caramelization.
Jamie

Brian: Stewie, if you don't like it, go on the internet and complain about it.

#26 deangold

deangold

    Brunello Riserva

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,978 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:57 AM

Both Tree and Leaf and New Morning Farms are selling them on the stalk. Buy one {Or 35!}

Remove the sporuts from the stalk and set aside (I just like to cut a cross in the bottom and blanch for a bit). Pare off the tough sking on the stalk. Be ruthless as he tough parts are really tough. The remainer is a delight. Cube it so the pices are about half the size of the sprouts, and blanch in salted water. Remember to ice the veggies after blanching. Drain well.

Take some pancetta or prosciutto trim, and twice as much onion. Sautee both in a little olive oil until the onions & pancetta starts to get translucent but not brown. Add some hot red chile flakes. Deglaze the pan with a mix of white wine & lemon juice {use about as much as you originally had pancetta} . Reduce until the liquid is almost all gone. Add copious amounts of duck stock {4 times as much stock as onion/pancetta mix, chicken will do, nothing from cubes or cans please!}. Reduce until the solids are in even proportion to the liquid. Season as you will to match the other flavors int he meal. Nutmeg, allspice are both nice but only use one or the other. Lots of pepper and salt can be added.

Take the drained blanched sprouts and stems and roast in duck fat over high heat until they beigin to color. Douse with the pancetta elixir above. Simmer for a couple of minutes. Taste and adjust for salt or lemon. Serve!

Dean Gold ~ Chef/Owner Dino's Grotto

1914 Ninth Street NW

Metro Green/Yellow Shaw Howard or U/Cardozo

Pay Parking Lots: 7th & T ~ U between 9th & 10th

Dino's Grotto In Shaw
Dino's Grotto on Twitter
Dino's Grotto on Facebook

 


#27 DanielK

DanielK

    leviathan

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,488 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 11:11 AM

Congrats, Dean, on a vegetable recipe that is more likely to cause me to have a heart attack than most of the main dishes it would be paired with. :(

#28 hillvalley

hillvalley

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,451 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 11:16 AM

Is there anyway to cook the stalk or is it too tough?
How do you know you're a well-adjusted foodie?-babka
Will schmooz for schmaltz-qwertyy

Just keep on smiling-Mrs. Brown

She never promised that life would be easy, but she did promise that if I hung with her the food would be good. -Joan Bauer


...the craving of a Jew for pork, in particular when it has been deep-fried, is a force greater than night or distance or a cold blast off the Gulf of Alaska.
-Michael Chabon

#29 mdt

mdt

    @#$%#^&*!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,043 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 11:41 AM

Is there anyway to cook the stalk or is it too tough?

See 2 posts before yours. :(

#30 MBK

MBK

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 436 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 12:25 PM

Just to add another simple use of brussels sprouts - last night i threw them, and potatoes, and sunchokes in a roasting pan, and roasted an Eco-friendly chicken on a rack above them. Delicious chicken-fatty roasted goodness!
DC Food for Thought

*****

If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.

#31 deangold

deangold

    Brunello Riserva

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,978 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 12:57 PM

Congrats, Dean, on a vegetable recipe that is more likely to cause me to have a heart attack than most of the main dishes it would be paired with. :(

Oh Pshaw!! Just grind up some lipitor in the sauce.....

Dean Gold ~ Chef/Owner Dino's Grotto

1914 Ninth Street NW

Metro Green/Yellow Shaw Howard or U/Cardozo

Pay Parking Lots: 7th & T ~ U between 9th & 10th

Dino's Grotto In Shaw
Dino's Grotto on Twitter
Dino's Grotto on Facebook

 


#32 hillvalley

hillvalley

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,451 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 04:09 PM

See 2 posts before yours. :(

I'm looking for something that won't cause me to go on liptor before my time :P
How do you know you're a well-adjusted foodie?-babka
Will schmooz for schmaltz-qwertyy

Just keep on smiling-Mrs. Brown

She never promised that life would be easy, but she did promise that if I hung with her the food would be good. -Joan Bauer


...the craving of a Jew for pork, in particular when it has been deep-fried, is a force greater than night or distance or a cold blast off the Gulf of Alaska.
-Michael Chabon

#33 Rovers2000

Rovers2000

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 473 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 04:11 PM

I just peel the tough outer layers off the stalk, slice so they're about the same size Dean recommended above and either saute or roast them (tossed with olive oil/kosher salt/black pepper). If you keep them the size of the half sprout they take about the same amount of time to cook.

Dave

"Make sure that the beer - four pints a week - goes to the troops under fire before any of the parties in the rear get a drop."
-Winston Churchill to his Secretary of War, 1944


#34 Pool Boy

Pool Boy

    DC Crüdite

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,648 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 09:26 PM

I'm looking for something that won't cause me to go on liptor before my time :(

LOL

Food.Wine.Cats.Hawaiian Shirts.Travel.Art.Music.


#35 Pool Boy

Pool Boy

    DC Crüdite

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,648 posts

Posted 09 November 2009 - 09:28 PM

I subbed dates in last night. Even better than the figs... esp. with the caramelization.

Thanks for the tip

Food.Wine.Cats.Hawaiian Shirts.Travel.Art.Music.


#36 qwertyy

qwertyy

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,326 posts

Posted 13 November 2011 - 04:32 PM

I've always just halved or quartered them and roasted them. Chiffonading was a new and wonderful experience. It really helps the flavors spread. It's almost like a hot coleslaw.

I browned some butter, then tossed in the chiffonaded sprouts with leek, apple, sage, then a little cider vinegar and apple cider. Delicious.

And salt and pepper.

This is SO good. I think I have a winner for Thanksgiving!

#37 New Foodie

New Foodie

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 518 posts

Posted 13 November 2011 - 07:20 PM

I haven't really ventured out of DC Restaurants and Dining before, but I think I need to come over here more!

Just did some sprouts last night for the first time this fall. Trimmed then cut the big ones in half, but left the smaller ones whole. Tossed with some extra virgin olive oil, salt, and pepper, then just roasted at 400 for about 30-35 min (shaking/turning a few times). Nice and caramelized with some good flavor.

Definitely want to try the chiffonade method!

-Jenny

"Vegetables are a must on a diet. I suggest carrot cake, zucchini bread, and pumpkin pie. ~Jim Davis, Garfield"


#38 Anna Blume

Anna Blume

    fruit bat

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,894 posts

Posted 14 November 2011 - 09:25 AM

This is SO good. I think I have a winner for Thanksgiving!

Here's the Union Square Caf version as mentioned in the other thread: Hashed Brussels Sprouts w Poppy Seeds.

#39 qwertyy

qwertyy

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,326 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 08:37 PM

This is SO good. I think I have a winner for Thanksgiving!

I know I'm micromanaging... but I really want to have a chill day tomorrow, and the hoards are demanding an early dinner. Can I chiffonade the Brussels sprouts tonight and cook the hash tomorrow, or will they brown and/or wilt?

#40 DC Deb

DC Deb

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 254 posts

Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:51 PM

I know I'm micromanaging... but I really want to have a chill day tomorrow, and the hoards are demanding an early dinner. Can I chiffonade the Brussels sprouts tonight and cook the hash tomorrow, or will they brown and/or wilt?

It's okay to cut them ahead of time.

#41 Sundae in the Park

Sundae in the Park

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 629 posts

Posted 30 November 2011 - 06:31 PM

The sprouts were the surprise winner for Tday, as folks had been eyeing them VERY suspiciously beforehand. Simply roasted (halved/quartered) with a bunch of dried cranberries and some stalks of thyme and rosemary, after the whole lot has been tossed with olive oil, S&P. They were much beloved and the first to go in the leftovers derby.

#42 monavano

monavano

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,245 posts

Posted 30 November 2011 - 07:09 PM

The sprouts were the surprise winner for Tday, as folks had been eyeing them VERY suspiciously beforehand. Simply roasted (halved/quartered) with a bunch of dried cranberries and some stalks of thyme and rosemary, after the whole lot has been tossed with olive oil, S&P. They were much beloved and the first to go in the leftovers derby.

Leftover brussels are amazing. They just get better.
Roasted brussels are terrific with a Greek lemon sauce.

#43 Anna Blume

Anna Blume

    fruit bat

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,894 posts

Posted 06 December 2011 - 03:35 PM

Some of the most beautiful Brussels sprouts I have ever seen in my life were on sale at Farm at Sunnyside this Sunday, Dupont Circle. New variety for the farm manager. Tree and Leaf was selling the "greens" this weekend, too: the leaves from the top of the stalk.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users