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#1 AlliK

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 10:39 AM

I made yogurt for the first time using a recipe from marthastewart.com and I really like how it turned out. The only issue was keeping our little kitchen at about 90 degrees for the 5 hours it takes to thicken. I kept the door closed and oven on (and said a thank you for having utilities included in our rent)...but was wondering if anyone has any experience using the yogurt making machines instead. Seems like a potentially easier way to go about this project. Do they work well?

#2 mdt

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 10:42 AM

I made yogurt for the first time using a recipe from marthastewart.com and I really like how it turned out.  The only issue was keeping our little kitchen at about 90 degrees for the 5 hours it takes to thicken.  I kept the door closed and oven on (and said a thank you for having utilities included in our rent)...but was wondering if anyone has any experience using the yogurt making machines instead.  Seems like a potentially easier way to go about this project.  Do they work well?

No experience with one of those machines. Alton Brown showed how to use an electric heating pad to make yogurt on one of his shows. This might be another way to accomplish your task.

#3 cjsadler

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 11:12 AM

I made yogurt for the first time using a recipe from marthastewart.com and I really like how it turned out.  The only issue was keeping our little kitchen at about 90 degrees for the 5 hours it takes to thicken.  I kept the door closed and oven on (and said a thank you for having utilities included in our rent)...but was wondering if anyone has any experience using the yogurt making machines instead.  Seems like a potentially easier way to go about this project.  Do they work well?

I think it was somewhere on Egullet that I learned this method: I heat the oven to 120, then turn the oven off, put the pot in and leave it overnight. Always works fine.

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#4 thistle

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 07:47 PM

I've just made yogurt using my bargain Salton 1 quart yogurt maker. At first, I figured this would be just another tchotsche in the kitchen (maybe it still is, cause I don't eat that much yogurt). My first attempt was a bust, but I think it was because my starter yogurt was old. This time, I heated up milk & dry milk powder (in the microwave, & boiled it over), stirred in some yogurt starter-Stonyfield Farms, plugged it in, & 10 hrs. later, (well, abit later than that, because I threw it in the frig overnight), I had yogurt! My son said, 'it's a little thin & tart'. but hey, it's yogurt, that's what it tastes like, right?

I had some this morning for breakfast, mixed w/ cinnamon, splenda, oats, & apple ( I call this 'horse chow')-it was delicious. I'm draining some for a yogurt cheese, & I plan on using some for a marinade for my chicken tomorrow night...

#5 Anna Blume

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 10:55 PM

While I haven't made yogurt for over a year, I became a true believer in the process since you can control the amount of tang (for me, a lot is appreciated), the texture and so on. Superior taste as far as I am concerned.

Do you have an oven thermometer? My soon to be erstwhile oven is ice cold, but back in the day, I had one that maintained a temperature of around 110 F. I put my filled sterilized glass jars far in the back, wrapped in flannel PJ's (slip the jar inside a leg or sleeve, then wrap), overnight. 12 hours, usually.

See the egullet discussion Chris mentions. Most helpful, single site? Mad Scientist from the Midwest.

#6 Karen Resta

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 10:14 AM

More yogurt-making information is to be found in the newly released book "Milk" but I still prefer my method of making yogurt overnight from the heat given off on the top surface of the cable-TV box. Makes the monthly bill seem slightly more worthwhile.

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#7 Sundae in the Park

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 02:28 PM

I've just made yogurt using my bargain Salton 1 quart yogurt maker. At first, I figured this would be just another tchotsche in the kitchen (maybe it still is, cause I don't eat that much yogurt). My first attempt was a bust, but I think it was because my starter yogurt was old. This time, I heated up milk & dry milk powder (in the microwave, & boiled it over), stirred in some yogurt starter-Stonyfield Farms, plugged it in, & 10 hrs. later, (well, abit later than that, because I threw it in the frig overnight), I had yogurt! My son said, 'it's a little thin & tart'. but hey, it's yogurt, that's what it tastes like, right?


Anyone else have any recommendations for electric yogurt makers? I make mine in the oven, which is kept at the perfect yogurt-making temperature by the pilot light, but my brother lives further north without an oven with a pilot light and can't find a warm enough spot to make yogurt anymore. He wants a yogurt maker for Xmas and I am looking for ideas. He does not want the kind with multiple vessels, so the 1-qt and 2-qt models are what I'm looking at. So far Yogourmet Electric Yogurt Maker and Euro Cuisine 2qt Yogurt Maker - Electric, as well as the Salton 1-qt are looking like the best options. I would appreciate any suggestions!

#8 sandynva

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 02:49 PM

Is a maker really necessary? My mom's made yogurt for the past 20 years or so by microwaving the milk, stirring in starter, covering it, and keeping it in the microwave overnight. turns out great every time. Many of her friends make it this way as well.

#9 Tweaked

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 03:29 PM

I use the Euro-Cuisine machine that has individual glass containers and it works great....so based soley on that then I would vote for the Euro Cuisine 2qt-er.

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#10 xdcx

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 04:49 PM

I use this method and it's been flawless and ridiculously easy. http://www.colorkitt...yum_yogurt.html

#11 Sundae in the Park

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 10:38 PM

Thanks all! Turns out he's already tried the microwave trick and it's just too cold at our house in the winter (it had been fine all year until now). We're going to try the thermal carrier next and if that doesn't work either, he'll have a thermal carrier AND a Euro-cuisine machine for Xmas. Thanks for the input!!

#12 Sundae in the Park

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 03:17 PM

Thermal carrier method works!! It's a little strange for him to be making yogurt in his room in a thermos, but hey, whatever works. So, no need for a fancy yogurt maker in any season even in cold climes unless you want a dedicated machine. Thanks again to the groupthink! :)

#13 goodeats

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Posted 11 June 2012 - 10:06 AM

Thermal carrier method works!!

I was SO excited to find out this works. My first batch failed, but I think it's because my yogurt sat too long in the fridge. So I tried again yesterday, and was way too excited to find yogurt made when I opened up the container today! I used Food in Jars recipe.

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#14 Sundae in the Park

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Posted 11 June 2012 - 09:23 PM

I was SO excited to find out this works. My first batch failed, but I think it's because my yogurt sat too long in the fridge. So I tried again yesterday, and was way too excited to find yogurt made when I opened up the container today! I used Food in Jars recipe.

Yay!! Yogurt making is kind of magical. I'm glad you found a method that works for you :)

#15 porcupine

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:56 PM

After reading this thread, I had to give it a try, too. Used Clear Spring Creamery whole milk - a little indulgent, that's some expensive yogurt, but it is tasty. A question, though: does anyone know how much nutrition is lost when you drain off the whey? Is whey mostly carbohydrates, protein, or fat? Actually, what I'm trying to determine is if the finished yogurt has about the same calories as the milk used to make it. Oh, and one other thing: how long does it keep?

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#16 goodeats

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 03:20 PM

Losing my whey.

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#17 Tweaked

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 03:55 PM

I've found that ultra-pasteurized milk makes inferior yogurt. Several of the national organic milk brands ultra-pasteurized their milk.

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#18 zoramargolis

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 10:19 AM

I've found that ultra-pasteurized milk makes inferior yogurt. Several of the national organic milk brands ultra-pasteurized their milk.

U.P. milk can't be used for making cheese. It can be a challenge to find non-ultra pasteurized goat milk to make chevre.

#19 Tweaked

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 10:30 AM

Lately I've been using Homestead Creamery milk for my yogurt making needs, available at Whole Foods.

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