Jump to content




Photo

Woodberry Kitchen, Chef Spike Gjerdje's Farm-To-Table Gem in Clipper Mill, Clipper Park Road

Woodberry Clipper Mill American Local and Seasonal Farm-To-Table Cocktails Patio Grill Weekend Brunch

  • Please log in to reply
59 replies to this topic

#1 Beto

Beto

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 112 posts

Posted 03 November 2007 - 02:31 PM

Chef Spike Gjerde has opened his long awaited farm-to-table restaurant in Clipper Mill. The wife and I went there last night and were shocked at the full dining room, given the restaurant's out-of-the-way location. No matter though, we had made reservations and were seated promptly in the loft overlooking the dining room.

The renovation to the building is stunning. The exposed brick walls and recycled old-growth lumber that were used are dramatically illuminated, looking both elegant and cozy at the same time. A wood burning oven is the center piece of the open kitchen, and most of the food on the menu seems to be cooked in it.

We ordered:
Oysters (raw and roasted)
Chicken liver parfait
Hamburger
Autumn vegetables

Everything was very good: the food, the service, and the space.

We'll be back soon.

Woodberry Kitchen



#2 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 27 May 2008 - 10:35 AM

Went to Woodberry Kitchen this weekend- great place, great food. Their philosophy is local/organic cuisine of the Chesapeake region. The menu had a lot of seafood- oysters, crabcakes, fish, and was mixed with small plates and larger entrees. The specials menu was just as long as the regular menu. I look forward to trying it again.
The Clipper Mill renovation is really nice, and the restaurant has a great atmosphere.
What we ordered:
local popcorn with sea salt & butter- nice, simple
stinging nettles soup- a wild plant made in a nice green soup- had a flavor like uncooked spinach
vegetables & dumplings- included fresh asparagus & bok choy- light, tasty
braised lamb shoulder with orange rhubarb compote & bread pudding- well prepared- delicious
chocolate pudding for dessert
pics

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#3 Choirgirl21

Choirgirl21

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts

Posted 28 October 2008 - 02:53 PM

I'm new to the site and thought I'd get my feet wet posting. I'm wondering if anyone else has been to Woodberry Kitchen yet. It's been on my list since it opened, but my BF and I haven't made time to go there. I'm very committed to eating local/organic so the theme is right up my alley, and I've heard great things about the food to boot. Curious to hear from other posters.

Jen, part time pourer at Black Ankle Vineyards

If not LOCALLY PRODUCED, then Organic.
If not ORGANIC, then Family farm.
If not FAMILY FARM, then Local business.
If not a LOCAL BUSINESS, then Fair Trade.


#4 Choirgirl21

Choirgirl21

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts

Posted 23 March 2009 - 03:39 PM

So I FINALLY got to Woodberry Kitchen this past weekend. As others have said, the renovated space is really great, as is the locally sourced food concept. We enjoyed everything we had - pickles/olives and deviled eggs to start, followed by the pork buns (basically a bbqed pulled pork on pretzel buns) and the pierogies (served two ways, potato with a dill sauce and sauerkraut with crisped pork). Entrees were the alsatian sauerkraut platter w/pork belly, sausage, spareribs and smoked turkey and the wood-oven MD rockfish with leeks and hen of the woods mushrooms. The pork itself was phenomenal - I tend to only eat locally sourced pork (my favorite is from a guy who raises pigs that forage in the woods) and I thought this pork was as good if not better flavorwise. The spareribs were a highlight, with a slightly sweet rub that was just right. The downside to the sauerkraut dish was that everything was a bit dry/overcooked. My fish was cooked well and was complemented well by the mushrooms and hint of sauce on the plate. Dessert was malt ice cream, which was just plain old YUM. We also had a really great bottle of Alsatian gewurtztraminer, which was from the featured biodynamic winemaker.

The downsides - we waited 30 minutes for our table (for which we had a reservation). At about 15 min in, when we asked the status, we were told it would be at least 10 more minutes and offered menus and asked if we wanted drinks. I had been resisting ordering a cocktail, but at that point couldn't wait any longer without something so we both ordered one. We didn't actually get them until 5 or 10 minutes after we were seated, which was another 10 minutes after we ordered them. I suppose I wouldn't have cared all that much if the drinks were complimentary, but they weren't. The other issue, overall I really liked our waitress, really friendly, great vibe, fairly attentive, but when she brought us dessert menus she failed to tell us that they were out of both the ice cream and dessert wine (one of only 2 offered) that we wanted. She did make amends by offering our alternative ice cream on the house, except that when the bill came it was on there. I wasn't going to say anything so we paid the full bill.

All in all, it was an enjoyable meal. I will definitely go back, in fact I look forward to doing so with a group so we can share one or two of the delicious-sounding flatbreads they offer. I just hope our long wait was abnormal and we won't have to experience that again or I'll be less enthusiastic in the future.

Jen, part time pourer at Black Ankle Vineyards

If not LOCALLY PRODUCED, then Organic.
If not ORGANIC, then Family farm.
If not FAMILY FARM, then Local business.
If not a LOCAL BUSINESS, then Fair Trade.


#5 giant shrimp

giant shrimp

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 939 posts

Posted 23 March 2009 - 04:57 PM

we went there the week after christmas and all i remember is that i started off with some of the best carrots i have ever been served at a restaurant. also, the steak was the one item on the disappointing side, and there were interesting wines from maryland. the walk from penn station takes roughly an hour. it is a mind-bending excursion through some of baltimore's intriguing neighborhoods (and also past the ace of cakes place, which is dressed up like a mean castle where you would expect to run into leather men). there's an easier way back; the light rail stops an easy block or so from the restaurant and leaves you off a few blocks from the station. we definitely will go back.

#6 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 11 May 2009 - 10:17 AM

I took the parents to Woodberry yesterday for Mother's Day, and had another great meal.

We had for appetizers- Oysters Rock- their version of Rockefeller- the oysters were really big
Potted Pork with mustard on toast
chilled Rhubarb soup with creme fraiche- my favorite
Brunch dishes- Shirred Eggs with lump crab and asparagus
Hangtown scramble- with bacon, oysters, eggs
Smoked Chicken, Andouille, Grits with redeye gravy
We finished with a fresh strawberry jam doughnut

I look forward to going back when more seasonal ingredients start coming in.

I noticed Top Chef contestant Jill Snyder (who used to be at Red Maple) was at the head of the line in the kitchen.

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#7 Choirgirl21

Choirgirl21

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts

Posted 05 June 2009 - 12:59 PM

I noticed Top Chef contestant Jill Snyder (who used to be at Red Maple) was at the head of the line in the kitchen.

I noticed that too. During our eternal wait, I saw her and my boyfriend and I debated whether it was her (he didn't think so). On our way out, I stopped to use the restroom and there she was. I couldn't stop myself from confirming it was her at that point and chatting for a minute before we left (and I'm sure saying something totally inappropriate since I had had some drinks).

Jen, part time pourer at Black Ankle Vineyards

If not LOCALLY PRODUCED, then Organic.
If not ORGANIC, then Family farm.
If not FAMILY FARM, then Local business.
If not a LOCAL BUSINESS, then Fair Trade.


#8 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 13 October 2009 - 01:00 PM

Woodberry is hosting a local sausage and beer festival this Sunday afternoon 3-5 pm.
I went to their local oyster event 2 weeks ago- amazing- great local oysters, oyster stew, and oysters grilled in their shells with melted butter. The turnout was pretty good considering Baltimore is dead during the Ravens game.

They got a mention on The Best Thing I Ever Ate by Duff from Ace of Cakes for their dessert, the CMP (chocolate, marshmallo & peanuts), which, from what I was told, returns to the menu at the end of the month.

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#9 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 16 October 2009 - 06:34 AM

just s brief update- due to the weather this weekend- the sausage event i mentioned in the last post has been cancelled.

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#10 KMango

KMango

    Mischieftain

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,156 posts

Posted 16 October 2009 - 06:49 AM

just s brief update- due to the weather this weekend- the sausage event i mentioned in the last post has been cancelled.

Thanks for the update. I had marked my calendar for this one since I'm long overdue for making the trek "up north" to check out Woodberry. I'll have to find another excuse in the near future, a great problem to have. :(

-KMango

"Everyone expects me to do certain things. It puts a ceiling on your progress. You’re blocked by your pride. To get good, you have to throw your board around and fall."  -Rodney Mullen

 

 


#11 SVT

SVT

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 197 posts

Posted 12 November 2009 - 10:44 AM

Fun, great meal last night. We did an early dinner so that we could return to DC at a reasonable hour. Service was friendly and ultra-efficient. the butcher plate was a great start, with great black sausage and weisswurst. Oyster stew and broccoli soup were very good middle courses, with gigantic oysters floating in a very rich broth. Instead of doing entrees, we did a few of the warm and cold plates--the smoked trout salad, the pork buns, and the spiced pear flatbread. The flatbread was a real winner, but the surprise hit were the pork buns, very filling and not at all what we expected--these were essentially pulled pork sliders on pretzel rolls, which were just delicious.

Food was tasty, portions were ample, and it was warm and comfortable inside (and rainy and ugly outside). We can't wait to go back.

#12 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 12 November 2009 - 01:11 PM

Their twitter noted today that the CMP- "chocolate, marshmallow, peanuts" mentioned by Duff from Ace of Cakes on the The Best Thing I ever Ate is back on the dessert menu for the season.

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#13 SVT

SVT

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 197 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 03:34 PM

Their twitter noted today that the CMP- "chocolate, marshmallow, peanuts" mentioned by Duff from Ace of Cakes on the The Best Thing I ever Ate is back on the dessert menu for the season.

Funny, I forgot to mention that I had this for dessert. It was good--a nice chocolate sundae with great peanuts and a sinful amount of marshmallow

#14 Inox

Inox

    shrimp

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 18 posts

Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:15 PM

I've been there on numerous occasions, and I've always really enjoyed myself. Within the last year or so, though, it's skyrocketed in popularity to the point that reservations are basically mandatory for dinner, and you're looking at a full house with all hands busy even during the week. Right now, for instance, there are no open reservations before Sunday.

This may be my imagination, but right around the time Michael Pollan gave his lecture at the Pratt (May 16) with Tony Geraci, things really started getting absurdly crowded on a regular basis. In fact, I saw Tony Geraci at WK later that same night.

My strategy to deal with this has been twofold. One, I get there early, usually around 5pm when they open. Two, I grab seats at the bar. Even when I've gotten there a bit later, a couple of chairs usually open up within 15 minutes or so.

See, for those who haven't been, the bar at WK is part of the main dining room. It's a gorgeous space, and eating food at the bar is entirely the norm. Plus, since there are multiple bartenders right there who can handle all orders, you get much faster service than you would from a table server, who's likely going to be extremely busy.

I apologize if all of this is painfully obvious; just trying to share a tip.

They currently also have an absinthe drink of which I forget the name, but which I highly recommend trying. It comes with an elaborate mechanism that allows the absinthe to run over two sugar cubes and into a glass below.

Here is some video I took of the mechanism (.mov/Quick Time format):

http://inox.org/Absinthe.mov

http://inox.org/Absinthe2.mov (Closer view)
--Inox

"Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan 'Press On' has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race." --Calvin Coolidge

#15 ol_ironstomach

ol_ironstomach

    Wunderpus photogenicus

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,339 posts

Posted 14 November 2009 - 12:51 AM

That's the icy water, normally dispensed from an absinthe drip, and not the absinthe itself. Likely a reproduction of the Cusenier "Auto-Verseur".

Dave Hsu
--------"Cuisine represents a knife edge that separates attractive stimulation from death."--- Art Ayers


#16 DonRocks

DonRocks

    leviathan

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,659 posts

Posted 14 November 2009 - 02:34 AM

That's the icy water, normally dispensed from an absinthe drip, and not the absinthe itself. Likely a reproduction of the Cusenier "Auto-Verseur".

Loucher (louche rhymes with douche).

dcdining.com - Restaurant Reviews - Facebook <--- LIKE Meeeeeeee! Twitter <--- FOLLOW Meeeeeeee!

If you're a member here, please Friend me personally on Facebook (send me a message with your screen name, please, so I know which member you are!)


#17 TedE

TedE

    bottom feeder

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 874 posts

Posted 29 November 2009 - 05:35 PM

We drove up for brunch to meet my parents today, and that meal really has me wanting to return. Soon. It's normally tough to accurately judge a place at brunch, but it was clear that the kitchen puts great effort into the menu and doesn't just slide by on standards since brunch doesn't "count" for fine dining review purposes. The stellar ingredients were really allowed to shine through. Even dishes that could have been excused for being heavy, dense comfort food/hangover cure fare were anything but. The smoked chicken and sausage over grits was a good example; could have been a gloppy mess. They also have the best gluten free bread that we have ever tasted, baked fresh each morning by the wife of one of the chefs we were told. This in and of itself is no small feat.

BTW, The Full Monty is about the best way to start a day I've encountered in a long time (Old Bay-laced Bloody Mary with maple cured bacon and steamed shrimp for garnish, served with a Natty Boh chaser).

"Mmmm ... floor pie ...." - Homer Simpson


#18 KMango

KMango

    Mischieftain

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,156 posts

Posted 29 November 2009 - 09:27 PM

We drove up for brunch to meet my parents today, and that meal really has me wanting to return. Soon. It's normally tough to accurately judge a place at brunch, but it was clear that the kitchen puts great effort into the menu and doesn't just slide by on standards since brunch doesn't "count" for fine dining review purposes. The stellar ingredients were really allowed to shine through. Even dishes that could have been excused for being heavy, dense comfort food/hangover cure fare were anything but. The smoked chicken and sausage over grits was a good example; could have been a gloppy mess. They also have the best gluten free bread that we have ever tasted, baked fresh each morning by the wife of one of the chefs we were told. This in and of itself is no small feat.

BTW, The Full Monty is about the best way to start a day I've encountered in a long time (Old Bay-laced Bloody Mary with maple cured bacon and steamed shrimp for garnish, served with a Natty Boh chaser).

Today must have been a Clipper Mill magnet.

I also just returned from there, my first foray into Woodberry Kitchen. Will post the specifics later, but in a word, damn.

Why did it take me so long?

-KMango

"Everyone expects me to do certain things. It puts a ceiling on your progress. You’re blocked by your pride. To get good, you have to throw your board around and fall."  -Rodney Mullen

 

 


#19 KMango

KMango

    Mischieftain

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,156 posts

Posted 30 November 2009 - 08:28 PM

Enjoyed an outstanding meal at Woodberry Kitchen over the weekend. Highways cooperated in both directions, making this trek from Northern Virginia not so difficult. Beto, Inox and others have vividly portrayed the striking surroundings of the space, and the critical focus on local sourcing, so I’ll jump straight to the flavors.

Philly’s own Vieux Carré Absinthe features prominently in the drink listing, including the bartender’s favorite “absinthe frappe”. A standard pour for me arrived a few degrees above the ideal temperature, the auto-verseur acting up a bit with delay tactics.

Woodberry’s “Headless Horseman” is well worth the loss of your noggin. Bourbon with house-brewed spiced pumpkin syrup, served in a copper mug, one of the best cocktails I’ve enjoyed all year. Large, flat ice cubes, deftly mixed, with the house-standard bamboo stirrer, an outstanding liquid representation of autumn.

Roasted Oysters Rock (Rockefeller both upstaged and outclassed) arrived as OOUS (oysters of unusual size) plated over warm rock salt. Not overcooked by a single degree, these were exceptional bivalves. The essence of pernod and warmed salt from the oysters played remarkably well with flavors from absinthe. Green fairy meets shimmering mermaid, a highly recommended pairing.

From the snack menu, we chose radishes with tarragon butter and sea salt (simple, French perfection; an indulgence of sense and sensibility) and deviled eggs with ham (remarkably light with pleasing horseradish after-nip).

We also ordered kitchen pickles and olives to enjoy throughout the meal. However, these turned out to deliver the only flat note of the night. With New Heights taking my expectation of house-made pickles to, well, new heights, this rendition seemed hollow and listless. Devoid of dill, garlic, juniper, or other seasoning, these carried just a hefty dose of vinegar and overt sweetening. The crisp texture was fine, but flavors and interest perplexingly absent. With everything else so spot on throughout the menu, I can’t help but think I received an off batch of what should have been a bracing palate cleanser.

Insofar as main dishes, my dining companion enjoyed the impossibly tender short ribs. I elected the short rib, onion jam, kale, and asiago flatbread. I would have sworn the flour was milled that very same day, shockingly fresh and flavorful. Toppings were masterfully balanced both in flavor and in quantity. And yes, unmistakable wood-burning flavor manifests throughout, lovely wisps of smoke and quiet sighs of char.

For desserts, some assembly is required at Woodberry, but overwhelmingly worth it. The Sweet Potato Pie and Flourless Chocolate Cake are well worth your tines, and more than worth the calories. Make sure you mix all the flavors on the plate together, don’t forgo this step lest you stop just short of amazing.

A few more random tips for the first time visitor:

➢I was a bit worried on the dark walk from the parking lot to the restaurant. It’s a short trek, no more than 150 yards, but no sidewalk exists between the two areas. This causes you to walk in the path of oncoming traffic, although slow-moving and mostly infrequent. Free valet parking is available. This may cost you a few bucks with gratuity, but would be a smart investment to avoid brief but potentially anxiety-raising ambling before and after your meal.

➢The food and environment will delight you, but don’t expect to be wowed by the bathrooms near the restaurant entrance. They do not appear to have been part of the careful upgrading for the rest of the renovated mill space. The hallway in that area actually smelled a little funny, like rain leaking into an old building. And not a single Dyson Airblade in sight!

➢You must, must, must get there early and you must, must, must eat at the bar. The best bar seats in the house are the ones closest to the wood-burning oven. Service is exceptional, and the hubbub of activity serves as it’s own entertainment. By the time you’ll be done with your meal, those bar seats will be needed for the droves of folks arriving for peak dining hours.

➢Order liberally from the snacks menu. For $1-$5, these whimsical servings brought to mind a more refined version of the “amuse yourself” menu from Arlington’s EatBar.

➢While watching workers in both the front and back of the house, their remarkable level of focus struck me as a hallmark of excellence and a differential advantage. I spoke somewhat at length with a few staff who expressed immense appreciation and pride with being part of Woodberry Kitchen. This is a restaurant team that’s deeply engaged in what they are doing. They are making every moment and every morsel count.

And I’m counting, too. The days until I return. Hopefully, a short recitation.

-KMango

"Everyone expects me to do certain things. It puts a ceiling on your progress. You’re blocked by your pride. To get good, you have to throw your board around and fall."  -Rodney Mullen

 

 


#20 JonParker

JonParker

    shrimp

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 11 posts

Posted 01 December 2009 - 01:12 PM

Nice review, KMango. This is probably my favorite place in the Baltimore area right now.

#21 ToothbrushFambly

ToothbrushFambly

    clam

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 01 December 2009 - 04:24 PM

Looks like the bank foreclosed on the developer of the community around Woodberry Kitchen. I really hope this doesn't adversely affect the place. It's a bright spot in kind of a dreary area.

http://bit.ly/5h8434

Edited by ToothbrushFambly, 01 December 2009 - 04:28 PM.


#22 synaesthesia

synaesthesia

    I <3 Bawlmer.

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,527 posts

Posted 13 December 2009 - 09:37 PM

I was a bit worried on the dark walk from the parking lot to the restaurant. It's a short trek, no more than 150 yards, but no sidewalk exists between the two areas. This causes you to walk in the path of oncoming traffic, although slow-moving and mostly infrequent. Free valet parking is available. This may cost you a few bucks with gratuity, but would be a smart investment to avoid brief but potentially anxiety-raising ambling before and after your meal.

If you cross to the side of the street opposite of the parking lot there is a sidewalk that passes by a pool.


Jamie

Brian: Stewie, if you don't like it, go on the internet and complain about it.

#23 KMango

KMango

    Mischieftain

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,156 posts

Posted 13 December 2009 - 09:48 PM

If you cross to the side of the street opposite of the parking lot there is a sidewalk that passes by a pool.

Of course, if I have enough of that absinthe next time, maybe I can also imagine my very own sidewalk suspended above the street in classic sci-fi fashion...

I seriously can't wait to get back to Woodberry, though. If only sci-fi were real, that place would be on my teleporter's speed dial.

-KMango

"Everyone expects me to do certain things. It puts a ceiling on your progress. You’re blocked by your pride. To get good, you have to throw your board around and fall."  -Rodney Mullen

 

 


#24 SVT

SVT

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 197 posts

Posted 14 December 2009 - 09:37 AM

Our second outing to Woodberry Kitchen was last night, celebrating a birthday. The first time we went, we had an early reservation (5 PM) and by the time we left the place was hopping. Last night we had an early-ish reservation, and they were very busy but very gracious. We luckily found a place at the bar and waited about 10 minutes for our table, which is no problem at all.

As with our first visit, we think the service here is very good--attentive, friendly, knowledgeable, and the servers here seem quite enthusiastic about the food and the restaurant. The cocktails were fine--this isn't a cocktail bar, but the focus on locally sourced or otherwise 'conscientious' spirits and adjuncts is completely in line with the general philosophy of the place.

And the food? Again, as with our first visit, we ordered too much and took home leftovers, but were very happy with everything that came to the table. Our salads--a kitchen caesar with a very mellow anchovy dressing, and a spinach salad with a nicely sharp goat cheese, both had very clean flavors and seemed stunningly fresh. After that we moved on to three 'from the oven' choices. The smoked chicken flatbread--with cheddar, honey, and a few other ingredients that escape me at the moment--was almost a touch soggy, likely from the combination of the chicken and the honey, but a great combination of flavors. The roasted cauliflower, to my surprise, turned out to be the dish of the night. This was a simple yet beautifully prepared inch-thick slice of a head of cauliflower, served with a light cheese sauce, roasted capers, and (maybe) baby chanterelle mushrooms. I could have easily eaten a second order of this, as it was perfectly seasoned and so satisfying. For the third dish, we ordered the mac and cheese, a lump crab-containing take on the classic, browned on top from the oven and filled with crab. Fantastic.

As this was a birthday, we overstuffed ourselves and finished with the flourless chocolate cake. As was said above, blending the flavors together--the cake, ganache (I think), the cocoa sorbet, and the vanilla ice cream--can be a challenge to put on your spoon but is so great. Once again, we left feeling satisfied (and ready to go back again).

#25 Choirgirl21

Choirgirl21

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts

Posted 11 January 2010 - 01:15 PM

Any other recent insights? I am going tonight with a few friends for my birthday and haven't been in a while. Kmango, your review is quite helpful, although I intend to stay away from the absinthe myself. :angry:

Jen, part time pourer at Black Ankle Vineyards

If not LOCALLY PRODUCED, then Organic.
If not ORGANIC, then Family farm.
If not FAMILY FARM, then Local business.
If not a LOCAL BUSINESS, then Fair Trade.


#26 Choirgirl21

Choirgirl21

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts

Posted 04 March 2010 - 08:23 PM

Went to Woodberry again last night (this is in addition to the wonderful meal I had back in January). This is another place that gets better and better with each visit for me. Highlights were the smoked onion dip w/homemade potato and sweet potato chips (I could live on this stuff!), the deviled eggs w/chipped ham, the flatbread (this time it was chorizo, goat cheese and sweet potato), and the scallop special I had was fantastic with these out of the world homemade hushpuppies alongside. I also thought my friend's ribeye was seasoned and cooked really well and came with a delicious, creamy cheesy potato gratin (I could do w/o the housemade steak sauce though, which tasted like glorified ketchup to me). And of course if you're an oyster fan, you can't go wrong with the raw or any of the cooked preparations (I'll take cooked, thank you very much ;)).

We picked this night to go b/c one of my favorite local musicians - Caleb Stine - was performing. With their live music on the first Tuesday of each month now, there's no reason not to go check out Woodberry (or go back if you haven't been in a while).

Jen, part time pourer at Black Ankle Vineyards

If not LOCALLY PRODUCED, then Organic.
If not ORGANIC, then Family farm.
If not FAMILY FARM, then Local business.
If not a LOCAL BUSINESS, then Fair Trade.


#27 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 14 June 2010 - 11:37 PM

The Baltimore Sun paper's dining blog mentioned that Woodberry has starting doing whole goat dinners for parties of 4-6 people. They are taking a locally raised goat and roasting the whole this head and all, and serving it with an array of sides.
I hear the price is about $185 and you need to pre-order this.

Anyone want to come up to give this a try?

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#28 goodeats

goodeats

    Certified geek.

  • Calendar Girl
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,659 posts

Posted 28 June 2010 - 11:52 AM

The Baltimore Sun paper's dining blog mentioned that Woodberry has starting doing whole goat dinners for parties of 4-6 people. They are taking a locally raised goat and roasting the whole this head and all, and serving it with an array of sides.
I hear the price is about $185 and you need to pre-order this.

Anyone want to come up to give this a try?

I just finally read about it and would be up for it. When??

Goat dinner blog post.

Taste. Feel. Be comforted.

Am not a fan of finding out that I started a new topic...

Oh ply me with barley,
Or ply me with rye,
Just don't expect to hear
A coherent goodbye.

Twitter


#29 KMango

KMango

    Mischieftain

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,156 posts

Posted 28 June 2010 - 07:17 PM

I just finally read about it and would be up for it. When??

Goat dinner blog post.

Same here, and I'd bring a +1!

(and no)
(not)
(a bridge troll)

-KMango

"Everyone expects me to do certain things. It puts a ceiling on your progress. You’re blocked by your pride. To get good, you have to throw your board around and fall."  -Rodney Mullen

 

 


#30 Choirgirl21

Choirgirl21

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts

Posted 01 July 2010 - 12:13 AM

Same here, and I'd bring a +1!

(and no)
(not)
(a bridge troll)

A few weeks ago a server from Woodberry told me it was a brief special and they're no longer doing it. He did say they might bring it back. If that's the case I know 2 more people who would be in (well, I'm a definite, I suspect Juliusc would be in as well).

Jen, part time pourer at Black Ankle Vineyards

If not LOCALLY PRODUCED, then Organic.
If not ORGANIC, then Family farm.
If not FAMILY FARM, then Local business.
If not a LOCAL BUSINESS, then Fair Trade.


#31 CheapEatsinCharmCity

CheapEatsinCharmCity

    shrimp

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 07 July 2010 - 07:47 AM

I ate there and, if you're mindful, you can get out without a huge hit to the pocket book. Here's my review.
Honest reviews of the best cheap eats in Baltimore http://cheapeatsincharmcity.com

#32 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 22 March 2011 - 09:31 PM

There's a buzz that the folks from Woodberry Kitchen are planning to open up a separate burger joint in Hampden on Falls Road in the near future.

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#33 GennaroE

GennaroE

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 320 posts

Posted 20 June 2011 - 10:34 PM

Fantastic meal here tonight. From the astoundingly good bread -- perhaps better than any bread service I've had in DC -- to the desserts, it was just about all awesome. Well worth a trip to Baltimore, if only for the bread and their over the top disco fries.

#34 darkstar965

darkstar965

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,877 posts

Posted 07 April 2012 - 10:25 PM

Wow-no posts here in nearly a year?!?!

Will have to rectify that though just with a placeholder for now,

Dinner here tonight. We were a group of 8. Between all we ordered and some freebies brought to our table, a most excellent meal with service every bit the food's equal.

Details tomorrow or next day but, in the meantime, I'll just say three things:

- excellent restaurant all around

- now I understand ChoirGirl's signoff! :-)

- cool news here we learned related to another recent thread (I'll link 'em once I get back to this).

#35 SVT

SVT

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 197 posts

Posted 09 April 2012 - 08:10 AM

We had Easter dinner here last night, and as usual walked away very satisfied and happy. The whole WK experience is great--easy valet, friendly greeting, welcoming restaurant space, very good service--but the food still remains the star of the show. We started with the pig in a blanket and the ramp and ricotta fritters, served with prune and pepper jam and mustard cream, respectively. These were simple starters but really delicious, and while the plate of fritters was ample I could have eaten about 20 more with the mustard cream. We had the farro salad, almost a palate cleanser, and the beef tartare, a lovely and flavorful combination of clearly (and properly) hand chopped beef, served just this side of ice cold, with a horseradish cream and a just-cooked runny egg. Again, I could have just eaten more of this. We then split the chicken and biscuit entree, a deboned half chicken with crispy skin served with a fluffly biscuit and kale. Awesome. As always, we look forward to going back...

#36 darkstar965

darkstar965

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,877 posts

Posted 10 April 2012 - 08:09 PM

I'm going to have to post something now from our dinner here this past weekend or it'll never post. This is a longer one so be forewarned those who don't like more detailed posts. Also, this one isn't as organized and informed as some I do. It was tougher because I didn't get a copy of our itemized receipt or take a copy of the menu--sheesh. So, with those caveats fully disclosed, here goes from memory.

CONTEXT

We were a group of eight including a couple of connected Baltimoreans, one serious food couple and their two adult sons. One of the sons had been four times in the last few months and served as a bit of an enthusiastic guide. My +1 and I were the only first timers. I know, big gap given how long WK has been open. We'd booked a month or more ago and were really looking forward to it. WK has a reputation I now know is deserved that goes beyond the very serious farm-to-table efforts they make (i.e., ramps and asparagus were all over the menu; 9 varieties of all-Chesapeake raw oysters were sorted according to salinity). I'm not sure I know any other restaurants in our area that break down whole animals of all types regularly. The "tavern steak" on their menu is so named because it's always different cuts depending on what they have. In this way, they can keep food costs down while still putting out great quality food and treating their staff particularly well. Judging by our experience, that strategy is working in the biggest of ways.

VENUE

Much has already been written so I'll just make three observations here that may be newer/different:

1. As others have said, the space is gorgeous with all the restoration, reclaimed woods, the use of high shelving (to display preserved foods) and vertical space (catwalk seating). It reminds me of a sort of mix of a sophisticated gastro/brew pub (a la birch & barley) and a mountain town venue as one might find atop a peak at Telluride or Vail. Pretty cool.

2. As much as I can tell from all the posts above, most of the venue comments were about the big room with the open kitchen, bar and two levels for seating with upper level overlooking the main floor. Maybe due to the size of our group, we were seated in a different room that most pass on the way in. Also large with shelves and just a wait station, we had a great time at a large corner table they'd set for us. Fun but easy to talk. Some of the repeat visitors thought it quieter than the main room FWIW so maybe something others could request if that's important to you.

3. Something about the charcuterie/whole animal processing focus along with the venue's architectural characteristics also reminded me of a place in Atlanta I recently tried and enjoyed (thanks to BettyJoan and about which I also still need to post!) called Holeman & Finch.

SERVICE

Really outstanding from both efficiency and effectiveness perspectives. It's awful I can't remember our server's name but he was great. All the normal explanations would apply supporting a great service assertion: attentive/not intrusive, we never wanted for anything, waters refilled (both still and sparkling with separate pitchers) regularly, etc, etc. But it really went way beyond that.

Given the nature of our group, our server fielded many questions about the food, provenance, technique, the building, history, wines, the staff, you name it. He knew everything. He answered everything asked with authority, substance and not a speck of arrogance. We all learned a lot and this really enhanced the experience. But it goes even further. Yes, this was a uniquely great service experience even relative to the finest fine dining spots.

I mentioned to our server that I was interested to know what coffee they serve. He answered it was Counter Culture and then asked if I'd be interested to meet the person who "heads the coffee program." Suffice to say, that really piqued my interest. A restaurant with a "coffee program?"

Sure enough, over came Allie, who leads a team of baristas who make all the coffee drinks separate from the regular table service staff. I chatted with her for maybe 15 minutes and she was pretty fab in all respects. Allie really knows coffee, knew all the good spots in DC, the roasters, even from around the country (it's a closeknit community). Though we'd already ordered a large french press of whatever the CC columbian was that they had, I also asked Allie for a cappuccino since I had to put the baristas to the test. Sure enough, it was a technically excellent and delicious cap.

Final note on service. I'm not sure if this is typical at WK and, to the best of my knowledge, none of us were known to the staff as anything other than regular joes and janes. One among us was a media person so possible they knew that but no sign of it. At two points in the meal, they brought out things for us to try without charge. This was always explained practically rather than altruistically. Two orders of deviled eggs after drinks were brought to our table to "tide us over" until the apps came out. At the end of the meal, 2 or 3 unfamiliar desserts appeared because we only ordered two at the table and the waiter (staff? restaurant?) really wanted us to better appreciate the work of their pastry chef. .

All in, the staff made this seem more like dining at someone's (palatial) home than at a restaurant. Great fun and a very rich experience.

DRINKS

First, cocktails. Several people ordered them and loved them. It's a crime I can't tell you what they were except for one with vodka served in a copper handled cup which is one of their best known. The friend next to me ordered a "lemonade" (not on the menu) and was instead served what they call an "Apricade." It had sweetness, just a touch of tartness and bits of apricot in the drink. Non-alcoholic, I loved this and had two. Redefined refreshing for me. I'd kll to have access to this on any beach vacation.

I don't think anyone had beer but we went through either two or three bottles of a very nice red from Maryland. I'll be honest here, out myself and say I was relatively clueless about the existence of a wine industry in Maryland let alone any specifics about vineyards or varietals being produced. I'd noticed ChoirGirl's "part time pourer" signature here on dr.com but had never looked up "Black Ankle Vineyards" before. The red we all very much enjoyed was from there. The label didn't make clear what type of grape it was and, with all our other questions and conversation with the staff, we didn't ask. It was a bigger red, 2009 vintage, cab/bordeaux style I'd guess. Very good. I was impressed enough to look up the vineyard when I got home and, beyond that, sure enough, there are dozens of vineyards in Maryland (he learned sheepishly). in fact, more than 50 are listed right here.

FOOD

Again, this is all from memory and we ordered a large number of things so this is just a sampling mixing starters and mains:

- Boneless ribeye--our friend who ordered this raved about it and it looked mouth watering. Very reminiscent of the delicious roseda ribeye we enjoyed at Society Fair the week before. Wish I knew more about this dish but, alas...

- Deviled eggs--one of the better versions I've had in awhile. Smooth texture but with excellent flavor enhanced way beyond just yolk and mayonnaise.

- Stuffed ham with ramps and asparagus. Two of us ordered this as it was one of the more unusual things on the menu and really featured the house curing and spring vegetables. It was great. Loved the ham. Perfectly cured with just enough but not too much salt. It was served atop an oyster stuffing; also excellent.

- Baked oyster starter. I had one, thought it pretty excellent and can't even do it justice to describe it. Maybe called Mason or something like that? Asian flavors? Yuzu? Mirin? Not sure but good. Very good.

- Whole roasted black bass. This was really the only miss of the night. It was dry and overcooked. No doubt they'd have redone it had we asked but we didn't give them that chance. It looked impressive when served.

- Chicken liver pate: Wow! We had some at the table not so enamored with pates but everyone LOVED this. So smooth, flavorful and nuanced. Served in a jar. Really memorable.

- Charcuterie board. This came with a salami, bresaola, corned tongue (mmm) and a prosciutto-like ham that wasn't prosciutto

- Beef and noodles. That may be the exact name of this main dish that two among us ordered and which I tried. As with most everything else, the ingredients really shone through on an otherwise simple but absolutely delicious dish.

- Flatbreads. There's a separate section of these on the menu and maybe three were ordered. They were finished and I can't really comment more other than to make the connection to the bread service. Mayby 3 or 4 different kinds of bread incling a wheat, french country style, all really well done.

There were 4 or 5 desserts at our table between two that had been ordered and 2 or 3 more that we were given. One, a pudding served in a wide-mouthed jar, was just okay. Another with loads of fresh blueberries was wonderful. Can't recall the others as I didn't try most of the desserts and was more focused on the coffees.

VALUE

Surprisingly good. Eight people. Plenty of starters and desserts. 2 bottles of wine. A few cocktails with and without alcohol. Coffees. All the mains. More than I've posted above. Total for us pre tax and tip was less than $700.

BOTTOM LINE

Woodberry Kitchen is a truly special and unique place with seriously dedicated and talented professionals resident in the kitchen and front of the house in all areas. Crazy I hadn't been here before but now that I've been, we'll be back for sure.

#37 Choirgirl21

Choirgirl21

    leviathan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts

Posted 10 April 2012 - 10:19 PM

Darkstar, thanks for the nod to Black Ankle. If the wine you had was an '09, then I suspect you had our Rolling Hills. You're correct that it's a bordeaux varietal although slightly more predominantly merlot (44% I think) than cab sauv.

Also, for anyone as enthusiastic as you about coffee who is in the area on Fridays, they have their coffee cuppings event at 10 am Friday morning. The event is free. Sadly I work nowhere near there so I have not been able to participate.

Glad you had as wonderful an experience as I have had. Your review makes me want to get back, and soon!

Jen, part time pourer at Black Ankle Vineyards

If not LOCALLY PRODUCED, then Organic.
If not ORGANIC, then Family farm.
If not FAMILY FARM, then Local business.
If not a LOCAL BUSINESS, then Fair Trade.


#38 JDawgBBall9

JDawgBBall9

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 143 posts

Posted 26 April 2012 - 01:16 PM

I don't know where to start so I'm just gonna type.

Went there last night and started out with their version of a Manhattan called a Manhampden (Maryland-style rye, California sweet vermouth, new fashioned bitters, Peychaud's, orange twist)...my Manhattan experience is pretty limited but this was extremely delicious, not too much bite and the first sip had a variety of flavor between the bitterness and sweetness. Another diner got a blackberry fizz (Blackberry vodka, Organic Snap, hard apple cider, lemon, Roggenbier) and while fizzes aren't my cup of tee, I didn't find it unappealing.

I started off with an Asparagus Salad (Charred ramps, pecans, pea shoots,'stony man')...not the most adventerous thing to start off with but it really appealed to me and it hit the spot. You could really taste how fresh the greens were and as someone who was raised on not-so-fresh vegetables I could really appreciate it. Other small plates that we started off with was a veal tartare served with chips which had a lot of flavor and She Crab Soup. Our waiter actually said before that he always recommends the clam soup instead but when the mind gets stuck on something, you have to get it. It was still good but it did make me wonder just how good that clam soup is.

I got the Mangalitsa Pork Chop served over McCarthy Farm black-eyed peas, ham hock, chard, asparagus and it was delicious. There was a thin layer of fat around the edges that provided a good flavor and while I don't order pork chops often, it was by far the best pork chop I've had. I may have liked the rest of the dish better, the flavors matched each other extremely well.

The two other entrees ordered was a mutton dish that doesn't seem to be on the website (I don't believe its the one currently up there) and the tavern steak over potatoes, wilted romaine, turnips, nettle cream, green garlic relish. Both were very good and full of flavor, but I must admit I enjoyed mine more than the others.

I also ordered a glass of the 2009 Black Ankle Rolling Hills, which was by far the best Maryland wine I've had. It was my first Black Ankle experience, but it definitely didn't taste like something you'd find from Maryland. I've wanted to try some Black Ankle wines for a while, now I'm going to be much more aware of their wines.

After dinner we did have a French Press (I think this one was from Peru) which was some of the best coffee I've ever had in a restaurant, seems like my feelings have been felt by others in this thread. Lots of flavor.


The decor was amazing, the server was a bit overeager if anything but very helpful, nothing really else to add to any of the prior experiences posted. As far as the value, we played guess the bill and I was about 20% too high. Our experience last night was great and it will be repeated in the future barring any unforeseen circumstances (please don't randomly close!).

#39 Lori Gardner

Lori Gardner

    ventworm

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 205 posts

Posted 26 April 2012 - 11:18 PM

I just posted a review of Woodberry Kitchen on my blog last night. Here's an excerpt. Suffice it to say that I am a big fan of the place, having now dined here twice.

Many restaurants boast a farm to table concept. You know it’s taken seriously at Woodberry Kitchen when you peruse the menu. Ramps and asparagus are incorporated into nearly every dish, reflecting what’s truly in season at the moment. It takes about five seconds for for me – I mean us- to decide on a starter to share. I remind myself that it’s my husband’s birthday and this should be his choice. I’m hoping he’ll agree to the asparagus flatbread with green tomato relish, ricotta, and cilantro. I have to give him time to consider other options, so I hold my breath and wait. Fortunately, he’s in agreement.
My first bite makes me gasp in astonishment. While I’ve ordered a flatbread with ingredients which I obviously find appealing, I am not quite prepared for flatbread perfection. The thin and crispy crust is what I always hope for and rarely receive. The combination of ricotta and cilantro surpasses my expectations. What gives the dish added depth is a delicate touch of sweetness created from homemade harvest chutney made from eggplant, tomato, and a selection of winter vegetables.

Full post is at http://beenthereeate...dberry-kitchen/

follow me on twitter: @foodobsessed6
follow my blog: Been There Eaten That


#40 Sundae in the Park

Sundae in the Park

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 605 posts

Posted 08 May 2012 - 11:40 AM

OMG, the roasted ramps!!!!! The stalk is crispy and the bulb is cooked soft and the whole thing is a flavor/texture bomb. The rockfish collar appetizer, dressed with ramps, asparagus, and peanut romesco, is one of the best things I've eaten in ages and is almost entree-sized. The portions here are quite generous. We had a couple of nice cocktails - the rum shandy is perfect for a person who likes balanced, fruity concoctions with a little beer fizz. We had excellent service and a simply wonderful night. There are three two-tops (hightops) in the bar area. When we got there at about 5:20 PM (Sat.) all three were available, though the other two were taken within the next 15 minutes. When we left, there was a scramble for our table, and several couples were politely duking it out for first claim.

We also had the extremely rich she-crab soup, the popcorn, the cornbread, and the slow-roasted pork entree. The chocolate pudding pie is small but very dense, but the CMP (a last-minute impulse add-on after we saw it on other tables) is a completely over-the-top malted ice cream sundae with a bruleed marshmallow creme top. I loved the whole cozy, friendly, delicious experience. It called to mind the atmosphere of the Zuni Cafe. I don't think we have anything quite like it here in DC.

#41 borderdog

borderdog

    clam

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts

Posted 09 May 2012 - 11:10 AM

I do not want to start my posts here negatively.However,while Baltimore needs some venues to become its institutions (in regard to restos of course) mediocer overpriced food shouldn't pass for such .

#42 goodeats

goodeats

    Certified geek.

  • Calendar Girl
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,659 posts

Posted 09 May 2012 - 11:39 AM

I do not want to start my posts here negatively.However,while Baltimore needs some venues to become its institutions (in regard to restos of course) mediocer overpriced food shouldn't pass for such .


I have not been here, but isn't this a bit harsh without some sort of explanation for your second post ever? You're dangling a carrot! Usually, we ask our new members to write a little more than Yelp typically requires...

Taste. Feel. Be comforted.

Am not a fan of finding out that I started a new topic...

Oh ply me with barley,
Or ply me with rye,
Just don't expect to hear
A coherent goodbye.

Twitter


#43 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 09 May 2012 - 12:24 PM

Thanks goodeats. I would agree.
borderdog, you really should expand on your critique of Woodberry. I think it has been around long enough that it is a Baltimore institution, and while I would agree the food is a bit pricey, I had one of the most inexpensive over the top meals here last fall. For a hundred bucks, I shared a whole pig's head with a have dozen sides of vegetables with 10 people. It was great and a surprising bargain for Woodberry.
In regards to Baltimore's lack of "institutions", I'm not sure how long you've been in Baltimore, but there are quite a few of them: the Charleston group, Chameleon, all the casual places in Canton/Fells (Peter's Inn, Jack's Bistro, Salt), and a whole lot of up and comers (Waterfront, Wit & Wisdom, B&O).

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#44 borderdog

borderdog

    clam

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts

Posted 09 May 2012 - 12:56 PM

I didnt say Baltimore has no good restaurants , i said it needs what it has and more. True i have only lived here for few years . I have been to Woodberry several times . I might have sound a bit harsh but anytime I bring criticism of it on a conversation with friends it's like crossing a taboo.

In my experience what they offer is overpriced . Meaning it is not as good as what they charge you for it. Please dont take this personally It is just an opinion.

#45 1000yregg

1000yregg

    ventworm

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 458 posts

Posted 09 May 2012 - 03:08 PM

I don't think I'm making this a personal issue. You just want to be more constructive if you're going to lay down a line a like "mediocer(sic) overpriced food". It's like writing a review for a movie and saying "it sucks". We at this board want to hear about good and bad experiences but you have to back it up with some detail and constructive criticism.

Why do you feel the food is overpriced? Why do you feel the quality is mediocre?

"Nobody bothers me"
my food blog: This Is Gonna Be Good


#46 synaesthesia

synaesthesia

    I <3 Bawlmer.

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,527 posts

Posted 12 May 2012 - 03:57 PM

I didnt say Baltimore has no good restaurants , i said it needs what it has and more. True i have only lived here for few years . I have been to Woodberry several times . I might have sound a bit harsh but anytime I bring criticism of it on a conversation with friends it's like crossing a taboo.
In my experience what they offer is overpriced . Meaning it is not as good as what they charge you for it. Please dont take this personally It is just an opinion.


I don't think anyone is saying you're not entitled to your opinion. Nor is anyone jumping on you for it. I'm going to venture to say, the Woodberry Kitchen thread may not be the best place to voice a very broad opinion about Baltimore restaurants. It would be more of a place to level a criticism specific to Woodberry Kitchen.

Just to add on to 1000yregg, I think we are asking for specific things like. I did not think ___ was as fresh as it should be/seasoned properly/cooked to the right degree/a good flavor combination, etc.

The rationale for asking for such specific details is that it adds some substance to the conversation rather than just a thumbs up or thumbs down, since taste is a very relative thing. Everyone has folks on this board they agree or disagree with, but there needs to be some background to make that decision. Also since it sounds like the experiences have been over time, it's important to give some vague hint of those times, as the quality of restaurants can ebb and flow.

I'll say I've had both positive and negative experiences at Woodberry, ranging from rather bland, overfluffy flatbreads at lunch to some spectacular raw bar items and a surprisingly meaty-tasting vegan bean dish.
Jamie

Brian: Stewie, if you don't like it, go on the internet and complain about it.

#47 Sundae in the Park

Sundae in the Park

    hammerhead

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 605 posts

Posted 20 May 2012 - 07:04 PM

I wanted to give Borderdog some time to elaborate, but I'll just chime in with some thoughts on the value of our recent meal at Woodberry. While there, one of the things I noticed was that you could have a fairly inexpensive meal. The burger and flatbreads (which looked great, and plenty of folks got them) are priced at $16 or less for a good-sized (and great-looking) portion of food. If you stick to that and say, a small bite per person (the snacks are $5 or less), you can have a lovely meal in a cozy setting with wonderful service for ~$20 before tax and tip. Not cheap eats, but not terribly expensive for the experience, especially considering the care and sourcing of the ingredients. It is more expensive than cheap eats, of course, but that's not why the legions are massing at WK. I did notice that there is a big difference between the size of the some similarly priced menu items. For example, some of the desserts are very small (chocolate pudding pie for $8), while the volume of food delivered for a different dessert is much larger (e.g., CMP, though that is priced at $11, and the funnel cake was huge, though I don't know how much that cost, as it was a special that day). While I liked our desserts there, I would say they don't represent the best value on the menu.

We got a couple of the snacks - the cornbread and the popcorn, and they were nice. They seemed fairly priced ($5 and $1) for the setting, though, in absolute terms, yes, they were definitely expensive. Where we felt we did the best, value-wise, were our larger plates. The soup and rockfish collar were wonderful dishes, excellently executed with top-notch ingredients. Our pork entree was very good, and the portion was generous enough to satisfy us both. The price per execution of these plates all seemed comparable, and even at a slightly lower price point, than fine dining meals we've had in the past. Perhaps, because we don't eat in Baltimore, the prices might seem high locally, while appearing fair to us? I do most of my fine dining in DC and San Francisco, so that might make a difference. For us, the food, in that setting (great atmosphere and terrific service cost $$ as well!!), was definitely as good, or better than what they charged for it. YMMV, of course, but the place was PACKED to the gills when we left, so apparently there is a viable market for their product. It's not exactly in the middle of things, so people are obviously going out of their way to visit.

#48 borderdog

borderdog

    clam

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts

Posted 31 May 2012 - 07:57 PM

I haven't been at WK in a few months .I guess I will have to give it another try. I am not going to say anything about the 16$ flat bread aka mini pizza.

#49 porcupine

porcupine

    ill-tempered sea bass

  • Forum Host
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,693 posts

Posted 26 June 2012 - 04:27 PM

It's a pity DC never had any sort of manufacturing industry, 'cause if it did, the city would have nifty old brick plants that could be renovated into charming spaces like Woodberry Kitchen. Character like that can't be built new. We had a great brunch there. I've never liked crab dip, but the Tilghman Island Crab Pot is awesome. Maybe it shouldn't be called crab dip, but it was served with crackers and pieces of toast. Sure was yummy. Also, buttermilk black raspberry ice cream. Great place. Really glad I don't live anywhere near it; I'd be fat and bankrupt in no time if I did.

Elizabeth Miller
fast cars, slow food


#50 ol_ironstomach

ol_ironstomach

    Wunderpus photogenicus

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,339 posts

Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:32 AM

It's a pity DC never had any sort of manufacturing industry, 'cause if it did, the city would have nifty old brick plants that could be renovating into charming spaces like Woodberry Kitchen.


Digressing for a moment, we sort of did once, but little of it survived urban renewal. For instance, the Heurich brewery was leveled in the 1960s to make room for the Kennedy Center, and the Papermill kept little but the smokestack in its 1980s transformation into condos.

One exception that leaps to mind is the original Hollerith tabulator factory (ca 1896) in Georgetown, one of the four birthplaces of IBM. Its downstairs is now the Sea Catch restaurant.

Dave Hsu
--------"Cuisine represents a knife edge that separates attractive stimulation from death."--- Art Ayers






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Woodberry, Clipper Mill, American, Local and Seasonal, Farm-To-Table, Cocktails, Patio, Grill, Weekend Brunch

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users