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#101 John William G

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 12:24 PM


 

To anyone going to Charleston in the near future, I recommend looking at this article in the Times.  It discusses a number of new and different restaurants which have opened recently.



 



#102 ktmoomau

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 04:22 PM

Had two great meals in Charleston.  We were supposed to have three, but the deluge sent us on the HHI early.  We ate at Magnolia's.  Split the low country egg rolls, which I really liked, it was a little spicy for Mom, and a radish salad which was nicley dressed and quite tasty.  Mom had shrimp and grits, I had duck, but it was different than what is on the online menu and was very good.  We also had some good cocktails, I liked the lavender collins.  

 

Our meal at Husk was really incredible, best meal of our entire trip.  The crispy pig ear lettuce wraps were killer good.  They had a perfect sauce on them and the cucumber onion was thinly sliced and gave nice crunch, perfect dish.  We enjoyed the punches which were also really good.  Mom had the cheeseburger which we both really liked, but the homemade ketchup kind of stole the spotlight with the potato wedges.  I had catfish with a smoky tomato sauce and succotash that was really good, as well.  We got the lemon meringue for dessert with hot tea as it poured down the rain outside.  The desert was good, as well, tangy not too sweet.  Very nice hot tea service, stellar service.  I loved this place.

 

We had reservations at FIG but it was pouring down the rain so hard that after giving mom a motor tour of the town and exploring what we could we took early leave so we didn't have to drive in pouring down rain and the dark.  Next time.


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#103 B.A.R.

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 07:45 AM

My wife just got back from a whirlwind weekend in Charleston. Ate at Husk and F.I.G. , among others. She enjoyed Husk, and found the food very interesting and unique. She was blown away by F.I.G. and said that it was one of the best meals she has ever eaten, eclipsing, in her mind, a 2009 dinner at Komi. "Not as sublime an experience as Komi, but with better food."


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#104 cocobinga

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 05:55 PM

Is anyone going to the Cook It Raw BBQ event in late October? The list of chefs in attendance is staggering.



#105 John William G

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 09:28 AM

Is anyone going to the Cook It Raw BBQ event in late October? The list of chefs in attendance is staggering.

And $100 per ticket is also staggering.



#106 d-harp

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 11:55 AM

(In chronological order)

 

Dodge's Chicken (on the way in to town from Savannah)

We stopped because it was mentioned in the directions to Magnolia Plantation (where we were headed.) In a gas station, next to a KFC. I'd compare Dodge's chicken to Bojangles. They don't have fries, just potato wedges (JoJo's potatoes), which appear to be cut from the full length of potato. Which is to say, they're really big. Two was more than I could eat. My meal was under $5.

 

Magnolia's

Didn't have a reservation on a Monday night. About a 15 minute wait for a table. Cocktails at the bar included a mint julep made with honey. I liked it, the BF didn't.

 

Starters

Crab Bisque - Solid. If I had to find a complaint, it might be that it was too thick.

Bacon & Egg Salad - I really enjoyed this. Noticeable chunks of bacon, creamy dressing provided good balance to pickled okra. Not the best deviled egg I've ever had, but good.

Salad w/ goat cheese, pecans and fried oysters (special)- Seemed like a regular salad with fried oysters around the plate. But there were a lot of oysters, probably seven or eight.

 

Mains

Fish special (I think it was snapper) w/ whipped sweet potatoes and vegetable (not my dish...can't remember) - Didn't taste it, but the BF ate it all.

Spicy Shrimp & Sausage (from the Small Plates section) - Not that "small." I thought it was really salty. The BF took the leftovers and later commented that he didn't think it was that flavorful.

 

Hyman's

Late lunch. Had previously seen people littering the street waiting for a table. After eating here, I can say I would not wait more than five minutes for a table. The food was good, but I wouldn't go out of my way for it. It was not that expensive so I feel like it was a good value.

 

Starters

1/2 dozen Oysters on the Half Shell -Don't remember seeing where they were from, Apalachicola maybe?

She Crab Soup - Magnolia's was better, but this was good. (Why do I keep ordering the same thing? I really like soup. I know, it's kind of weird.)

 

Mains

Fried Green Tomato Napoleon - After Magnolia's (and several meals in Savannah) where I far over-ordered for myself, I picked an app as my main. The fried green tomatoes were layered with crab dip and came topped with fried shrimp and a "cajun" remoulade of some sort. The batter didn't stick to the tomatoes that well, but overall it was pretty good.

Combo Platter with Fish (I don't remember which one, it was from column 3 on the board), Sea Scallops and Crab Cake - Crab cake was okay, nothing to write home about, the BF enjoyed the scallops and ate all the fish. Came with cole slaw and hush puppies. The BF chose red rice as the third (included) side.

 

Husk

Celebrating the BF's birthday. Had hoped to get there early enough to grab a cocktail at the bar before dinner, but didn't have time. Copying and pasting items straight from the menu to do them justice.

 

I thought we sat for a bit too long before anyone came to the table, but when I realized our waiter was the one who had been at the table next to ours for an extraordinarily long time discussing exactly what was in each dish so that the girl could order, I cut him some slack. 

 

Starters

Chilled Sweet Corn Soup with Lone Palmetto Chèvre, Vadouvan Spiced Popcorn from Anson Mills, Shaved Courgettes

Wood Fired Clams, Riverdog Rye Broth, Surry Sausage, Roasted Corn and Red Peppers, Wilted Greens

 

We consider this, Wood Fired Bone Marrow with Asian Pear Mostarda and Grilled Bread but the BF thought it was too much to order the marrow and then a steak. The soup (yes, more soup for me) was amazing. It was creamy, yet not too heavy. The squash and zucchini added a really fresh taste to the soup and the vadouvan spiced popcorn really made the dish for me. The clams were good, but I really enjoyed the sausage and greens more. For me, the best part is always using the bread to soak up the broth.

 

Mains

Heritage Pork from Adam Musick, Smoky Beans, Carolina Gold Rice, Collard Greens, Pot Likker

TX Wagyu Flat Iron with Ember Roasted Oyster Mushrooms, Loaded Baked Potato “Salad”, NC Heirloom Tomato

A Skillet of Cornbread with Allan Benton’s TN Bacon

 

 

The pork was a duo, pork shoulder wrapped around pork belly. The beans were butter beans and mixed with the rice and greens, which I wasn't expecting. I usually don't like butter beans, but this was really great. There was an acidity to the pot likker that went really well with the creamy texture of the beans. The steak dish was solid, but what made it stand out was the sauce that had Worcestershire sauce. Probably nothing you couldn't do at home. The loaded baked potato salad was new potatoes, bacon, scallion, cheese in sour cream/mayo dressing. I am going to start making potato salad like this at home. The tomato was elevated in tomatoey-ness (so not a word...) with a tomato vinaigrette. Cornbread was not necessary, but we ordered it anyway. The crispy outside made it better eaten when it was served, but I enjoyed a leftover piece for breakfast.

 

Dessert

They said it was chocolate pudding, but the consistency was more like mousse. Topped with marshmallow fluff that had been toasted with a torch. I'm not usually much for desserts, but enjoyed this.

 

Drinks

Charleston Light Dragoon's Punch

Recipe from Charleston Preservation Society. California brandy, Jamaican rum, peach brandy, Black tea, lemon juice, raw sugar.

 

Barrel-Aged Manhattan

he classic, enriched with new American Oak. Our seasonal take on the Manhattan with bourbon, rye whisky, and flavored bitters. Barrel aged for 30 days.

 

The punch was a bit sweet for me and I don't usually drink rum, but the BF really liked it. The barrel-aged Manhattan was excellent. If you're into that kind of drink, I'd say it's a must.

 

Hominy Grill

Breakfast

Blackberry Honeysuckle Collins - pureed blackberries, honeysuckle vodka and a splash of ginger ale. Really refreshing. Probably dangerous because it didn't taste too alcoholic.

 

Country Breakfast - Two eggs, grits, biscuit and bacon. It wasn't Benton's, but it was really good, thick-cut bacon.

Big Nasty - A fried chicken breast on a biscuit with gravy and cheese. Probably a bit much considering everything we'd eaten over the past 3-4 days, but I couldn't resist. And it was totally worth it. The gravy was a little bit too peppery (green pepper, not the seasoning) for me, but still really good.


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#107 catharine

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 02:08 PM

Heading to Charleston with a 1 year old and while all of the places recommended here sound great, I am wondering which ones are family friendly. Ninety percent of the time my son is very well behaved and an adventurous eater. However, like most toddlers he doesn't yet know what an inside voice is, so we are not planning to go anywhere too fancy with him. I am told that Husk, The Wreck, and Bowen's Oyster House are good bets (thanks DR friends via Facebook). What else? This is my first real vacation in a long time, and after 10 months on a strict elimination diet I am ready to EAT!



#108 Xochitl10

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 08:17 AM

I am also looking for Charleston recommendations, but for runners. I'm running the Charleston half-marathon with a friend in January, and would appreciate recs for a pre-race dinner and a post-race lunch or dinner.


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#109 TedE

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 08:50 PM

Funny, I just looked up this thread to ask about places since we are considering heading down for the half-marathon this year as well.

I have a more general question, though: if we wanted to stay somewhere centrally located and walk or short cab ride from the beter (and diverse) places to eat and drink, what is the best option? With the number of folks we may be travelling with I am thinking that we may want to rent a house, so proximity to to hotels isn't necessarily a must. Trying to decide on staying downtown vs. a short drive away in a REALLY big house.

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#110 bettyjoan

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:04 AM

Funny, I just looked up this thread to ask about places since we are considering heading down for the half-marathon this year as well.

I have a more general question, though: if we wanted to stay somewhere centrally located and walk or short cab ride from the beter (and diverse) places to eat and drink, what is the best option? With the number of folks we may be travelling with I am thinking that we may want to rent a house, so proximity to to hotels isn't necessarily a must. Trying to decide on staying downtown vs. a short drive away in a REALLY big house.

 

For a race, I highly recommend renting a house (or a condo).  It is so much easier to have a kitchen and prepare your own pre-race meal (restaurants in town will be swamped with hungry runners), and if you are traveling with a group of friends, a house offers you some common space to chill and socialize that you will not have in most hotels.

 

Of course, the rental houses are going to be away from downtown, but Charleston isn't that big.  I love Folly Beach and Sullivan's Island (go to Poe's for burgers and beers), and Isle of Palms is great if you are looking at a higher budget.


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#111 TedE

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:03 AM

For a race, I highly recommend renting a house (or a condo).  It is so much easier to have a kitchen and prepare your own pre-race meal (restaurants in town will be swamped with hungry runners), and if you are traveling with a group of friends, a house offers you some common space to chill and socialize that you will not have in most hotels.

 

Of course, the rental houses are going to be away from downtown, but Charleston isn't that big.  I love Folly Beach and Sullivan's Island (go to Poe's for burgers and beers), and Isle of Palms is great if you are looking at a higher budget.

 

We always do big houses if there is a large enough group going, and there are some places we did find downtown (not as big as the places in Isle of Palms, etc., but big enough for who we think will want to fly in).  Usually we do big meals at a house with this group, but it's coming up on a milestone birthday for me so I may want to forgo any responsibility and just eat out a lot.  The race is really just an excuse for some runners to visit Charleston and gorge ourselves :)


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#112 TedE

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 10:48 AM

Turns out it's Restaurant Week that weekend (1/12-19) :(

 

FIG and HUSK can't accommodate a party our size on a Saturday, so we are tentatively booked at Fish; any reports?  The menu doesn't look very inspiring, I'll keep poking around.  At this point I'm seriously considering staying an extra day to eat around on Monday!


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#113 Xochitl10

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 04:32 PM

The race is really just an excuse for some runners to visit Charleston and gorge ourselves :)

 

It's amazing what I feel entitled to eat after a race. I've done well by racing in Montreal and Charleston. ;)


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#114 SVT

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 05:48 PM

We did a Thanksgiving week at Kiawah, and thus had a chance to venture into Charleston for a few nice meals. The first of these was at McCrady's. This was my 5th time there over the last 5 years, but first time for my wife, so it was interesting to get both impressions. Quite simply, we both loved it. We ordered a la carte, and had smooth, unrushed, informative, and fun service, beautifully prepared dishes, and very, very flavorful courses. We did corkage ($25/bottle, I believe, and a free bottle of corkage for each bottle ordered from their menu). For some strange reason, every time I go to McCrady's I expect that it will have fallen down--it's been open too long, or Sean Brock has spread himself too thin, or something) but there was no evidence of that.

 

We also had dinner at FIG, and while I had high expectations, I was a bit underwhelmed. It was undeniably good, but nothing in my meal rose to the level of greatness that I had anticipated based on reviews and word of mouth. It may have been me; I'd been golfing in the cold weather all day and was tired, and that certainly impacted my perception of the restaurant, but nonetheless I still felt that the food was a bit flat.

 

We also took my fairly food-conservative dad and uncle to Rosebank Farms Cafe on Seabrook Island for lunch. This is also a regular spot for me, and it was as good as always. The fried chicken, in a phrase, kicks ass.



#115 Xochitl10

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 08:53 AM

Much to my chagrin, I got to do very little actual eating in Charleston last weekend. :( The highlight was the post-race cocktails and nosh at the Thoroughbred Club in the Charleston Place Hotel. Gorgeous old hotel bar with a great cocktail list. I had the Velvet Vesper -- Tanqueray 10, Tito's Vodka, Cocchi Americano Dry Vermouth, cardamom liqueur, and an orange twist -- which was very smooth and well-balanced. Lamb naan with arugula, black olives, tomato salad, and feta; and pork/shiitake potstickers were delicious; the crabcake over a corn/bacon relish was bland.


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#116 TedE

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 02:03 PM

We, too, were only able to hit a few places down there over the long weekend.  The highlight for us was certainly The Ordinary (same folks as F.I.G.).  We only did cocktails and apps there, but everybody in our group was talking about the marinated razor clams (apple, jalapeno, cilantro, and I'm pretty sure yuzu in there somewhere) from the extensive raw bar selection.  Oysters were fresh as well, but the selection was limited.  Cocktails were quite good in general, and the space is incredible (old bank building with soaring ceilings).  The late dinner that followed at Fish was decent, but with Restaurant Week my expectations were low, and the place turns into a night club after 11:00 or so. We were kind of rushed out of there by the thumping bass.

 

I was flying solo my last night there, and the hotel was right across the street from HUSK.  I was hoping just to eat off the bar menu, but it was much more limited in scope than I'd anticipated (literally a handful of bar snacks and a burger).  I stuck to cocktails and a snack of pulled pork hush puppies.  The former were great.  The latter are the 'maple-roasted brussel sprouts' of the Charleston dining scene, they were on seemingly every menu in town.  Perfect for something to soak up a couple cocktails, though.  Afterwards I walked over to F.I.G. where there were a couple spots at the bar.  Echoing the above review everything I had was very good, but I was not blown away.  They had a different preparation of the razor clams (fennel, golden raisins, pine nuts) that I enjoyed but did not live up to the preparation at The Ordinary.

 

One surprise down there was the local beer scene.  The group I was with had planned a surprise brewery tour for me that was complicated by the fact that A) none of them are open on Sundays, and B) the top choice and probably the most hyped one down there (Coast) was boxed in by the marathon route and had to alter their hours on Saturday.   We ended up at Westbrook, a huge purpose-built facility you can see from the highway that I hadn't heard of.  They had a limited but pretty wide selection of styles on tap, including a rye pale ale (One Claw, available year round), a doughnut imperial stout (the maple-roasted-brussel-sprout of the brewing scene) and a Gose (!).  The latter was pretty spot on; completely funky with a wicked lemon tartness; even better was Gozu, the same recipe finished with yuzu which mellowed everything out to just the right degree.  I got this on tap wherever I spotted it around town.  We had planned on hitting Holy City, but never got around to it.


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#117 Sundae in the Park

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 01:19 PM

So it turns out a conference weekend coinciding with the Food and Wine Festival is NOT a great time to try to get into the heavy hitters in town without waaaaay advance reservations.  So we had to “make do” with some other restaurants and had quite a few truly lovely meals anyway.

 

Coast – LOVE the space and laid-back vibe in an old factory (down an alleyway) and terrific seafood dishes.  They have all the classic fried and grilled Southern-style preparations (and do an excellent fried shrimp) but also have less-rich, more modern options, like a selection of ceviche and tacos.  I had a large piece of perfectly grilled grouper flanked by a black bean concoction and a potato croquette.  It was too big to finish but I managed all the fish (w/ help), as it would have been a shame to leave a single speck behind.  I thought the BBQ sauce on the bacon-wrapped scallops was a bit much, but my husband thought they were great (probably because I’m not overly fond of BBQ sauce in the first place).  The service was friendly and efficient service and we tried to go back later in the weekend but it was too packed. 

 

Cru Café – my favorite meal of the trip.  It’s a charming, light-filled setup in a historic(-looking?) house with beautiful, wonderful, comfort food. I had a several assorted lunch dishes that didn’t really gel as a meal but were just what I wanted.  I got to sit at the bar overlooking the kitchen and saw that I would have happily eaten just about every dish that went out.  My duck confit salad (arugula, caramelized pecans, tomato, fried onion and port wine vinaigrette) was balanced and rich and tart and pretty all at the same time.  I had a smoky chicken tortilla soup that was deeply flavored and earthy, but I skimped on that course to try to do justice to the 4-cheese side of mac. It’s heavy and decadent, baked just for you and way too large a portion for one person (hence, a side), but totally worth the indulgence.  The other salads and sandwiches looked truly excellent and I wished that we had time to get back and try more things!

 

Jestine’s Kitchen – We picked this spot because I’d been before and they had availability on a Friday night, which slightly damning, but my husband wanted more fried so it was actually a good place for us to be.  The shrimp was just fine (smallish portion) but the fried chicken is quite good (and huge! Two drumsticks and a breast - crispy, craggy, salty outside and juicy interiors).  The green beans are reminiscent of school lunch (not in a good way, and I love me some cooked-to-death green beans) but the pickle starter is refreshing, the pies are homey, and the service is warm and sweet.

 

Hominy Grill – We popped in for brunch and had a lazy meal in the garden.  I had wanted to get the nasty biscuit but, because we take care of each other here (thanks for posting about the green peppery gravy, d-harp!) I knew the gravy would be ruined for me.  I had instead some lovely, surprisingly light salmon cakes with poached eggs (the tomato-based sauce was a very good, if surprising accompaniment, but at this point in the trip I welcomed any delicious lightness I could find!).  He had some she-crab soup, a few biscuits, and some pecan pie, and was in heaven the whole time.

 

Monza Pizza – The interior is snazzy but cozy, with zebra wood tables and exposed brick walls.  Our pizzas were tasty and a nice change from all the richness, but I think we’re spoiled for Neopolitan greatness.  The generous toppings weighed down the pizza somewhat and the dough didn’t quite have that rippable pliability that I look for.  Also, I didn’t care for my bread soup (way too smoky, too much bread, not enough veg).  Still, the server was an absolute angel for our difficult party (5! Arriving and leaving at different times!  Eating just dessert or drinking! Argh.) and the tiramisu and coffee were divine, so we had a nice time.  It’s worth a stop for ordering simply and hanging with friends.

 

Butcher and Bee – It’s a strange, out of the way location with fabulous food, as evidenced by the line at opening.  My chicken curry salad was a tiny bit spicy, served on a bed of greens with some quick Asian pickles on the side, and was just the antidote I needed after the weekend of creamy fried things.  I got the lamb pita, the lamb biscuit, and roast beef sandwiches to go, and all held up beautifully as we scarfed them throughout the day.  The sandwiches are robustly flavored, filled with top-notch ingredients, and all have distinct characters. I would say this place is a must go.  I wish we’d had the chance to try it out for late night on the weekend or Thursday night!  It's slightly annoying that they don't have a set menu (it's changes every day and is posted onto Facebook daily, I think) but I understand why they are confident that you will find something you like.

 

As for non-food attractions, Fort Sumter is really easy to access from downtown, and the boat ride to and from the fort affords great views of the bridge and the city (plus, if you’re lucky, the dolphins will come and play).  It’s a fun activity for history or photography buffs that isn't as popularly discussed as the usual suspects in town.



#118 ohstate

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 04:04 PM

Just back from a short week in Charleston.  Had some great food, really love this town for hospitality.

 

Husk - dining solo, didn't have reservations - opted for the Bar at Husk, which is next door to Husk. Had the cheeseburger.  Wonderful. Thought about it so often during my meetings that I had to go back for another the last night. It has been getting some pretty decent reviews lately. Bartenders are great, bourbon selection was quite nice. 

 

Poogan's Porch - had first brunch here. It was fairly quiet at 10 am, but they were much busier later.  I had the chicken and waffles, and the husband had an open faced oyster omelet thingy. Both were excellent (my first chicken/waffle experience, so I can't compare)

 

Magnolia's - second brunch (hey, his flight was leaving at 4, and he needed another meal).  I was too full to order much, but he really like the salmon special.  White table cloth kind of place, and we wandered in drenched (2 inches of rain in an hour at high tide, should have brought my waders, as the streets were flooded).  They didn't blink and took us right in.  Wasn't our original plan, but turned out very well.

 

Fig - second night dining alone - thought I would snag a bar seat, but they had a wait for that - there was one seat at the community table, so I was seated there right away. (6 top)  Had the schnitzel, which was yummy. The menu was unusual, local sourced, mostly seafood (hello, of course, Charleston), but I stick to meat mostly. This was a great option.

 

Cru Cafe - Dinner our first night, lunch (escaped the conference buffet since the hotel was so close)... Great double cut pork chop on night one, perfectly executed. My main regret was not getting the side of mac and cheese. I looked amazing when the table next to ours got it.  Went back for lunch and got a seat at the bar - the shrimp BLT was tasty. I'd go back for it. A tad messy, but worth it.

 

Fleet Reserve - on the water, busy, busy, not bad, not great.  Recommended by a couple at our hotel.  Just a quick lunch after our walking tour.  Can't say it would make the list again, there is so much good food in Charleston.

 

Eli's Table - dinner on Saturday - great service, good food...again, I'd try some of the other places discussed here (I need to get to Hominy Grill next time).  I had the shrimp and grits, which was quite good. Husband had some sort of shank (he can't resist shank).  My favorite shrimp and grits is in NOLA at Mr. B's, so I aways compare. This didn't have the spicy note (red eye gravy missing)...

 

Craftsman Taphouse - went with a good sized group of work colleagues.  Did not have reservations anywhere, because we were supposed to go to the Riverdogs baseball game but were rained out. Short walk from the hotel, amazing beer selection, really interesting bar food (upscale, locally sourced).  Everyone seemed happy with their selections, which is a pretty major accomplishment with this group.

 

I'm still thinking about that burger, btw.


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#119 StorageLady

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 09:45 PM

One night, and one night only in Charleston. And we will arrive after driving 8 hours in the car with two panting dogs. Dropping the dogs at the hotel (have to stay across the river because it's the only available dog-friendly hotel). At any rate, we will be ready for a nice meal - although not a "get-dressed-up" after driving all day mean. Something that personifies Charleston would be fantastic.

 

So... what do you think? Magnolias? Mustard Seed? 

 

Thanks all



#120 ktmoomau

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 09:59 PM

One night, and one night only in Charleston. And we will arrive after driving 8 hours in the car with two panting dogs. Dropping the dogs at the hotel (have to stay across the river because it's the only available dog-friendly hotel). At any rate, we will be ready for a nice meal - although not a "get-dressed-up" after driving all day mean. Something that personifies Charleston would be fantastic.

 

So... what do you think? Magnolias? Mustard Seed? 

 

Thanks all

 

I would try to do Husk, it's very casual you'd be fine not dressed up. Yes, the burger is good but they have more Charleston type dishes too.  Although Magnolia's is a tiny bit more formal and maybe more traditional Charleston- chicken livers, shrimp and grits type.  But I've never been to Mustard Seed.  


But I learned fast how to keep my head up 'cause I
Know I got this side of me that
Wants to grab the yoke from the pilot and just
Fly the whole mess into the sea. The Shins
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#121 StorageLady

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 12:19 AM

One more thing.. We are arriving on a Sunday. Does that change your opinion on where to eat?

#122 jandres374

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 08:14 PM

Might want to give The MacIntosh a try.

#123 lggl

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 12:29 PM

You may not want to get back in the car and there are many choices to narrow down to just one, but I recommend Edmund's Oast.  http://edmundsoast.com/

We went there back in May a week or two after it first opened.  Really cool space both inside and out.  Excellent food.  Crazy huge list of draft beers.  Fun back story.   

I didn't drive but don't think it was too far out from downtown.  If others have more time than one night to spend in CHS, you should definitely add this to the list. 







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