legant

Passings

110 posts in this topic

Vincent Gruppuso, 67, Seller of Pudding Snacks

Vincent Gruppuso, the founder of Kozy Shack Enterprises, a company in Hicksville, Long Island, that sells millions of four-ounce cups of pudding, particularly rice pudding, at supermarkets in the United States, Canada, Mexico and Europe, died Dec. 29 at his home in East Hampton, N.Y. He was 67.

The cause was complications of diabetes, said his son-in-law Michael Caridi.

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Eddie Miller, Ace Chowhound Ate His Gut Out

Eddie "Bozo" Miller, 89, an icon of gluttony who claimed to have bested man -- and beast -- in outrageous displays of eating and drinking, died Jan. 7 at his home in Oakland, Calif. He had diabetes and heart trouble.

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Jean-Claude Vrinat, Owner of Famed Paris Restaurant

Jean-Claude Vrinat, for more than three decades the owner and director of the Taillevent restaurant in Paris, which is regarded by many as the pinnacle of elegance in French cuisine, died Monday. He was 71.

Under Mr. Vrinat, Taillevent became a gastronomic benchmark by which other great Parisian restaurants are judged.

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Carl Karcher turned hot dog stand into a fast-food empire

Carl Karcher, who borrowed $311 to buy a Los Angeles hot dog cart in 1941 and turned it into a fast-food empire with more than 3,000 Carl's Jr. and Hardees restaurants in 13 countries, has died.

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Lovie Yancey, founder of the Fatburger restaurant chain

"I think of that stand as like a little postwar survivor that's a tribute to the entrepreneurial spirit of an African American woman who really did usher in what became a very good model for a franchise business"

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Viktor Schreckengost, a celebrated industrial designer whose products included mass-produced dinnerware

In the 1930s, Viktor took up the cause of making the American homemaking job not only easier, but more pleasant by creating dishes that fit modern tastes and lifestyles.

The dinnerware shapes and treatments that Schreckengost devised for several American manufacturers are among the most innovative designs in the history of American dinnerware.

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Napa Wine Trailblazer Peter Newton

Peter Newton, a pioneer in the California wine industry who founded Sterling Vineyards and Newton Vineyard, was among the first in Napa to experiment with Old World techniques, and showed the region's promise with Merlot

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Jamie Davies, 73, Schramsberg Winery Founder

Jamie Davies, who with her husband, Jack, founded Schramsberg Vineyards and pioneered the production of fine sparkling wine in California. Davies was considered the grande dame of the American sparkling-wine industry.

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Bill Jackson, 54, Chef, Restaurant Executive

[unable to post stable link; excerpt below]

Bill Jackson, 54, a chef praised for his Modern American cuisine and a partner in a prominent local restaurant group, died March 1 at his home in Churchton.

Since 2000, Mr. Jackson had been a corporate executive chef and partner with Great American Restaurants, which owns Carlyle, Sweetwater Tavern, Coastal Flats, Artie's, Silverado, Mike's "American" and Best Buns Bread Co. He formerly spent 12 years as executive chef and managing partner at Best Buns and Carlyle, long known as Carlyle Grand Cafe in Arlington's Shirlington Village.

In 1994, Washingtonian magazine called Mr. Jackson "the person mainly responsible for [Carlyle's] reputation as a wonderful place to eat," with a menu based on the fundamentals of French cooking but with Asian influences.

The Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington named him chef of the year in 1995. He was a 1976 honors graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. Afterward, he was hired by chefs Pano Karatassos and Paul Albrecht to work at their resort, the Lodge of Four Seasons, at Lake of the Ozarks, Mo. He later spent nine years as chef at their highly rated fine-dining restaurant, Pano's & Paul's, in Atlanta.

Great American Restaurants is scheduled to open a Reston restaurant this fall in Mr. Jackson's honor, Jackson's Mighty Fine Food and Lucky Lounge.

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Al Copeland, 64; founder of Popeyes Chicken

Al Copeland, who became rich selling spicy fried chicken and notorious for his flamboyant lifestyle, died Sunday at a clinic near Munich, Germany.

Inspired by the success of a Kentucky Fried Chicken franchise in New Orleans, Copeland in the early 1970s [… opened] a restaurant, Chicken on the Run. ("So fast you get your chicken before you get your change.")

After six months, Chicken on the Run was still losing money. In a last-ditch effort, Copeland chose a spicier Louisiana Cajun-style recipe and reopened the restaurant under the name Popeyes Mighty Good Fried Chicken, after Popeye Doyle, Gene Hackman's character in the film "The French Connection." The chain that grew from that one restaurant became Popeyes Famous Fried Chicken.

Also see the BayouBuzz.com obit.

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Alson Howard Smith Jr., 80, the holder of Tastee Freez franchises in Virginia, West Virginia and portions of Pennsylvania, died March 23.

In a 1982 article in The Washington Post, Mr. Smith, was described as "a short, rumpled Tastee Freez entrepreneur […]”

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Geri Cook, 83; shopper made a career of bargain-hunting

Geri Cook wrote the "Bargains" column for The [LA] Times. In it she directed readers to [...] restaurants with "happy hours" that include free hors d'oeuvres and coffee bean shops where the price goes down the more you buy.

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Lucy Appleby, 88; cheese-maker who fought pasteurisation

Lucy Appleby was one of the most accomplished cheese-makers of her generation and took a bold and ultimately successful stand against attempts to have unpasteurised cheese-making banned in Britain

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Walter Camp Jr., 79, who was president of one of Washington's first health food stores, Vita Food Co.

I believe there were at least two stores: one next to the WaPo building on M street; the other on 14th street, now home to a watch repair shop.

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Huntington Hartford, 97; Heir of a principal founder of the Great Atlantic & Pacific [A&P] Tea Company which provided him with a living of about $1.5 million a year.

What did he do with that $1.5 million a year? Click.

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Huntington Hartford, 97; Heir of a principal founder of the Great Atlantic & Pacific [A&P] Tea Company which provided him with a living of about $1.5 million a year.

What did he do with that $1.5 million a year? Click.

The article made one slight error. He didn't sell out to Resorts International. He brought in Jim Crosby and Jack Davis of the Mary Carter Paint Company as partners, and they gradually bought him out piecemeal. They subsequently renamed the whole thing Resorts International, got the necessary gambling license, and made big bucks. Later RI was one of the first, if not the first, operators in Atlantic City. I once did a consulting job for them (how to better supply foods to the Bahamas operation, which relied on old DC-6 freighter flights from Miami carrying prime meats and such that were not otherwise available in Nassau). When I went to their HQ in Atlantic City to make the final presentation, I made it a point afterwards to get over to the White House to have one of their legendary sandwiches. I couldn't finish it, so I wrapped it up and took it along home on the little plane that I had to fly between DC and Atlantic City. Unfortunately, I left it on the seat when I deplaned, a lapse I have often thought about and regretted ever since.

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J. R. Simplot, developer of the frozen french fry, 99 years old. A billionaire, ranked 89th in the Forbes list of richest Americans.

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