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  2. I have had a couple of meals here recently and I think it is a nice addition to the neighborhood. It is in the former Grapeseed space. I tried the Doro Wat, the vegan sampler, Quanta firfir, and the fried fish. Everything was good, I would say no better or worse than the places I used to go to around 9th and U in DC. So probably not worth making a detour for, but nice to have a solid Ethiopian option. I didn't love the decor - there as some more private areas but most of the tables and chairs are pretty close together and it can be loud. There also appeared to be a lot of staff compared to the customers, and the service was very pleasant but not always timely, so I hope the place does OK...
  3. Today
  4. Does anyone know *anyone* they trust who's actually in favor of 77 and can make a plausible argument in its favor?
  5. Just bringing this back up to the top in case anyone is interested.
  6. Another old timer from Northern NJ and Essex County: The Verona Inn, open since 1947. Definitely a Cheers type bar: A photo from the end of an all day party celebrating the NJ Devils winning their first Stanley Cup in 1995
  7. I think the precipitating factor may have been the party's arrival at the host stand on Segways.
  8. Kev29

    Bell's Beers

    I've never had a problem with the finish. Obviously serving conditions are important but I've enjoyed pretty much every one I've had. Related: Churchkey had Two-Hearted on cask once and I honestly think it was the best glass of beer I've ever had. I love hoppy American ales on cask if they're well made. You get the hop notes without the C02 upping the sting. A mellower finish. Don if I ever see it on cask there again, I'll alert you.
  9. ktmoomau

    City Kabob and Curry House

    So we ordered again- Hubby got chicken saag which looked good, but I didn't try it. I got the chicken kadal based on how much I liked it last time. This time it was gloppy and oily. We also ordered samosas chaat, which were spicier again than expected. So not as good of an experience as last time. Bread was the same as last time, although I could notice a slight difference between garlic kulcha and the naan of the pieces of garlic.
  10. I don't think the ladies at A&J know our names, but they know us well enough that if we order something a little different, they will come back to check. "Is this right? You always get X, not Y." And if we don't show for a few weeks we'll get a good-natured chiding when we return.
  11. ol_ironstomach

    Haagen-Dazs

    Hear, hear.
  12. DonRocks

    Luggage and Suitcases

    The Tumi bag I have (had) was from probably 2005 - there you go. This is *exactly* why ongoing conversations about products are important <he says, while drinking a Bell'sTwo Hearted Ale, which is drinkable, but by no means "great" or even "pleasant">.
  13. ol_ironstomach

    Luggage and Suitcases

    What era/line was it from? Pre-2000, their bags were tough. Nowadays, I wouldn't spend the money on anything but their Alpha line, and IMHO the Briggs features are now better. ETA: I should clarify that I'm talking about B&R's "Baseline" line; their "Transcend" offerings seem to use similar fabrics, but lighter-duty frame construction.
  14. DonRocks

    Luggage and Suitcases

    Wow, just to offer up another perspective: My Tumi suitcase was awful - lightweight, impossibly flimsy, and the darned thing broke within two years in a couple of places. I'm willing to accept that it was an anomaly, but consistency is critical here (which is why I'm struggling with my Eagle Creek having snapped on one side of the handle after, perhaps, twenty trips).
  15. ol_ironstomach

    Luggage and Suitcases

    There's an old joke ("Questionable Answers for Job-Jocks") in which the interviewer asks "where do you want to be in 5 years?" and "what do you feel is most important to success in our firm?", and the newly-minted Booz Allen tyro's answer is, respectively, "in an airplane" and "a large suitcase". Among soft-sides, the classic heavy hitters are: Tumi and Hartmann, in part for their once-formidable worldwide customer service. I would add B&R. You won't necessarily find larger diameter wheels in this group, but they've always used better bearings, harder wearing fabrics, and provided better seam protection and scuff protection along the roller handle and lower rear frame. In the next tier, I'd say Travelpro, Eagle Creek, Victorinox, and many others. Then the better generics. Then the rest. YMMV.
  16. DonRocks

    Luggage and Suitcases

    Dave, I'm genuinely curious: What (soft-shell) line have you found that's more heavy-duty than Eagle Creek? The primary way I find my suitcase on the carousel (other than Magdelena having had put on a purple ribbon) is the size of the wheels, which are invariably the largest of the lot. That said, in full disclosure: The handle on my penultimate-largest bag had one side snap off, and is hanging by the other side - this is my one (and only) complaint with Eagle Creek. And it's a big one, because when you pay this much for luggage, it should last for at least ten years: This is the H2 of suitcases.
  17. ol_ironstomach

    Mid-Century Modern Furniture

    All good reccs. Donnelly's pieces will be in the finest condition, and priced to match. Modern Mobler is a personal favorite; the Georgia Ave location is larger, but I think they tend to put their most interesting wares out in the Kensington showroom, so you really do need to visit both. Peg Leg has to do a lot with a little space, and I think their acquisition style is more eclectic, but they also have a bunch of MCM tchotchkes that the other two don't carry at all. FWIW, should you find yourself in Atlanta GA, pay a visit to RetroPassion21. The owner buys MCM in Europe and ships containers over a few times a year. And while you won't find too many of the famous Danish makers that everyone else carries, she favors German and English MCM makers you probably won't find elsewhere. And other anonymous items that fit the bill. We loaded up on a couple of teak floor lamps very cheaply; they needed a bit of rewiring and refinishing but look great now. Sadly, Mid Century Salvage in Charlotte NC is apparently no more.
  18. ol_ironstomach

    Luggage and Suitcases

    I, for one, find myself liking Briggs & Riley more and more each time I acquire a piece. Once the poor man's substitute for Tumi, they keep evolving clever improvements to their bags, from the ratcheting expansion/compression system to the tethered piggyback strap, and are arguably the innovators in the category. Unlike Tumi, they've retained a lifetime repair policy across their line. The bags have become significantly lighter over the years, albeit at the cost of some toughness. If there's anything that annoys me, it's that the ratchet system cannot be rigidly locked into position to force an expanded bag to stay oversized to create airspace around fragile contents. My earliest piece, not quite 20 years old, is a fully-framesheeted tank of a rollaboard, and so long as I'm on a carrier with no carryon weight limit, it's my go-to for getting bottles home safely. +1 on Eagle Creek pieces. Their bags are a bit light-duty for my tastes, but their packing cubes and suit/shirt folders are still great for internal organization.
  19. DonRocks

    Bell's Beers

    K & B, I know your messages were written in good humor, but since I respect both of your palates, I'm hoping you can evaluate the finish of Two Hearted Ale. It has a nice golden color, a pine-and-citrus nose, an aggressively hopped mid-palate, and then ... ? (I understand you'll need to have one and ponder it before answering, so no rush.) Cheers, Rocks
  20. TrelayneNYC

    New Orleans, LA

    That ancient copy of The Joy of Cooking sells for $200. It's the second printing and was issued in 1936. Pictured is a recipe for "pigs in potatoes".
  21. TrelayneNYC

    New Orleans, LA

    As you know, I collect vintage cookbooks and Kitchen Witch is on track to be my "go-to" store with Amber Unicorn in Las Vegas a close second.
  22. I was watching a baseball video from the Dead Ball Era, and noticed a brief glimpse of a vendor (presumably in Chicago) selling "Red Hot" sausages. You can catch a glimpse of this at around the 5:18 mark (look at the bottom-center of your screen, but don't blink, or you'll miss it). (I think it's pretty safe to say that Barry Bonds would have hit about 9,000 home runs had he played in the 1920s.)
  23. I was finally able to get the dry hot pot that I had desired last night. I asked the person who took my order for carryout (who is the guy who it seems like manages the place) about the spot next door. He said that they are in the process of building it out, but that it has taken longer than they anticipated with the normal delays from the county building inspectors. They are building a bigger kitchen (he explained that the current kitchen isn't big enough, that there is only one day's worth of refrigerator space. They will convert the rest of the space to a larger dining room, and will also build some party rooms. They plan to keep the current menu, but expand it slightly.
  24. Yankee Pier is owned by a company called Tastes on the Fly (get it?) - they have six food outlets at SFO. I went directly to Yankee Pier's website, clicked on "SFO," then "Contact," and tried to write the gentleman named Michael - the recipient's email bounced (although I note that the CEO's name is Michael). All of this means nothing, except that the email bounced.
  25. Yesterday
  26. dcandohio

    Dinner - The Polyphonic Food Blog

    Chicken tostadas with sharp cheddar cheese, tomatoes, homemade pickled red jalapenos and lettuce.
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