Jump to content

lovehockey

Members
  • Content count

    371
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    4

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  1. Tonight's game, delayed 3 hours, has brought a new addition to the DL (and I personally wouldn't be surprised if it's for the rest of the season) after Harper slipped on 1st base at full speed in the bottom of the 1st. Legs are not supposed to move that way. He couldn't put any weight on left his leg as he left the field. I'm sure there are tears in some of his knee ligaments.
  2. Chicken 65

    Namaste has it on the menu.
  3. I'll admit, I've only got delivery from here. But I can say that the rotisserie chicken doesn't need utensils (really good!) and the Lomo is pretty tasty as well. The yuca fries are good deal. The first time I got the Cubano it was too salty but the second time it was just right. If you're in the delivery area you can get beer and wine.
  4. Fastest game of the year: 2:29. 10-1 against the Mariners and the 10 were scored against the starting pitcher (poor guy), in the rain. --- Jayson Werth (Pat)
  5. Or, in another scenario, you need the opponent to beat themselves. The best example of this in my lifetime was the 1986 Stanley Cup playoffs. Throughout the 80s it was said that the Calgary Flames would have done much better in the playoffs if they weren't in the Smythe Division. In the majority of those years they had to get past the powerhouse Edmonton Oilers in the 1st or 2nd round. In 1986, they won their series against the Oilers due to an Oilers' own goal (seriously, to this day I can't watch it). That year the Flames won the Stanley Cup against Montreal, and that is the only Cup they have (they made it to the finals in 1989 and lost to Montreal but never played Edmonton because LA took care of them in the 1st round).
  6. To save others from the hassle, it's Penalties in Minutes. While stats are kept on the number of penalties a player or a team has amassed, PIMs are also used because penalties vary in their length (the most common being the 2-minute minor, the 4-minute double minor, and the 5-minute major). For example, in the graphic Don linked the Caps had 2 penalty minutes while the Pens had 4. From that it's easy to say that during the 1st period 1 Capitals player had a 2-minute minor penalty. However, for the Pens, that 4 minutes could mean 2 players with 2-minute minor penalties or 1 player getting a double minor that is 4 minutes in length. But the solution to the 2 minors or 1 double minor question is given in the stat directly below the PIMs, and that is the number of power plays. The Pens were 0/1 on their power play, which means that they didn't score during the time that the Caps player was serving his 2 minutes. The Caps, however, were 1/2, which means they had 2 power plays and scored on one of them (in this case, when Crosby was in the sin bin). Therefore, there were 2 2-minute minors against the Pens during the 1st period. Also, when PIMs are totaled, the entire time assessed by the referee is counted, regardless of whether that actual time is served. Going back to the Crosby penalty, he was released from penalty box after the Caps scored 45 seconds into the 2-minute power play. However, the stats guys did not go back and subtract the 1 minute and 15 seconds not served. This is why the PIMs say 4 minutes for the Pens instead of 2 minutes and 45 seconds (the full 2 minutes of the other guy's penalty plus the 45 seconds Crosby actually served before the goal).
  7. Four games in the ever-changing Denver weather environment (plus that altitude thing) and a 3-1 record: 8-4 loss (the day after playing the ESPN Sunday night game against the Mets), 15-12 win (Turner hits for the cycle), 11-4 win, and 16-5 win (11 of the 16 runs coming in the top of the 7th). Imagine if they played at Coors field half the season...
  8. Yeah, Don, like them or not, hip checks for the most part are entertaining to watch. The backside-over-teakettle result is common. That being said, the overwhelming reason the players want it to be made illegal is the injury risk. As an example, do it wrong and you just gave the guy a knee injury. For the record, this is the hip check against Ovechkin (and it was clean). He came back later in the game. Here is Ovechkin dishing one out.
  9. The hip check against Ovechkin that was called for a tripping penalty...it was a clean hip check. That being said, there are a lot of NHL players who want to make it illegal.
×