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Found 52 results

  1. That would be my #1 option (YMMV) in Cleveland Park, then. Great news for Cleveland Park!
  2. Grand Central Market In 1963, As Shot By An Oscar-Winning Cinematographer, by Oren Peleg, Jul 18, 2017 12:07 pm, on laist.com.
  3. I'm sure this will be a smashing success just like Eataly was back in 2010, when Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich opened their first store in New York, but a small voice inside me keeps asking "which part of Chinese cuisine has omakase sushi?" "China Live: A Food Emporium of Epic Proportions in San Francisco's Chinatown" by Jonathan Kauffman on sfchronicle.com
  4. Had the pleasure of visiting our own Poivrot Farci at 8 Hands Farm (website) in Cutchogue, NY last week. Poivrot is butchering, cooking, baking bread and farming at a small, sustainable farm out on the east end of Long Island's north fork. The farm recently built an amazing kitchen for Julien to perform his craft. They also have a food trailer (a food truck on steroids) that will start serving homey meals featuring their chickens, pigs, and sheep. They are also building a cheese-making facility. Local resident Tom Colicchio is a big fan of Poivrot's work. Below is a shot from his walk-in. Very much worth a trip if you are out that way. Beautiful country, filled with farms, vineyards and water.
  5. A friend and I stopped for a quick look around today, hoping they had dine-in. They do some carryout sandwiches and the place smelled absolutely terrific, but there's no indoor seating. A few bistro tables outside, but it was a tad too chilly to sit on metal chairs on a cloudy afternoon. They advertise fresh bread brought in daily, and there's a selection of wines, gelato, pasta and similar. And the red sauce smells like I'd want to drink a gallon of it.
  6. EatZi's closed all their locations outside of the Dallas-Fort Worth area (Rockville, Houston, Chicago, and Atlanta), all on very short notice. However, they're still going strong in Dallas-Fort Worth, maintaining their four locations there, and planning to open a fifth. From the Wikipedia article: "Following their time in the White House, President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura rely on Eatzi's and friends since neither like to cook." Note that the founder, Philip J. Romano, also founded Fuddrucker's (which, according to their website, has "the world's greatest hamburgers") and Romano's Macaroni Grill (which, according to their website, "sources from Italian farms"). To our friends in Houston: If this type of comment about Fuddrucker's and Macaroni Grill offends your sensibilities, I urge you to use Yelp - you'll be happier there; if you don't mind good-natured ribbing and honest criticism, you'll enjoy it here, and we'll be both grateful and better-off for having you with us - give us a chance, and you'll see that we walk the walk). Cheers, Rocks
  7. Mar 15, 2016 - "Classic Street Food from Maido, now in Ardmore" by Craig LaBan on philly.com Jul 24, 2014 - "Maido! Leaving Narberth for Ardmore; Lapp's Market Moving In" by Cheryl Allison on mainlinemedianews.com
  8. The new market in the north part of Del Ray just opened (a small regional chain, I guess), and I went in this morning to check out the scene. First glance, it's a typical small, yuppie market with a small amount of good looking produce, limited meats, but has the other staples (canned goods, cereal, soups, condiments, baking stuff, etc.), as well as a good amount of fair priced to expensive wine. They have a small beer area, a deli counter, a baked goods counter. It's expensive, but not that crazy ($2.99 for a gallon of milk, but the produce is pretty pricey). The most interesting part to me was the cafe/restaurant/bar area. It's adjacent to the deli, and pretty cool - looks warehousey/loft style with a long bar, seats there, and tables. The menu had ... korean fried chicken made to order, three different types of ramen (I think shoyu, miso, and something else), and then various small plates. How strange! It wasn't lunch time yet, so they weren't serving, but I'm certainly interested in trying it. If there is halfway decent Korean fried chicken and ramen walking distance from my house, I may have to reconsider my feelings about a higher power. Curious to see how it will do, location is in those new apartment buildings on Mt. Vernon, north of Hume but south of San Salvador.
  9. Last week, I got this tweet from Jonathan Copeland: Although I had largely forgotten about it, somewhere in the recesses of my brain, it resided, because I was thirty-minutes early for an appointment in Falls Church today, and - <blink> - I remembered. I didn't remember who sent it, and I didn't remember the name of the restaurant; merely that someone I trusted had mentioned good Banh Mi in Eden Center - I pulled in. I wasn't at all sure which restaurant it was, and there has been *so much* changeover in this shopping center in the past six months that Saigon West is borderline unrecognizable. I waffled a bit, then headed into Banh Ta, and as soon as I walked in, I thought to myself, 'This *must* be the place.' Banh Ta is a tiny little pillbox boutique, just a few stores down from the outstanding Thanh Son Tofu, which has the best tofu I've found in the DC area. Despite being just a counter, it's very upscale looking, with market goods and an atmosphere that reminds me of a smaller version of the incredible Phu Quy Deli Delight. If you haven't been to Thanh Son Tofu or Phu Quy Deli Delight: GO! I ordered a #1, Pork Belly (Bah Mi Thit ??, $4), the ?? being on the sign in the first link in the previous paragraph, and absolutely indecipherable by me and my illiterate Vietnamese (my apologies to native speakers - any guidance will be much appreciated). It's no secret that I haven't exactly been blown away by DC-area Banh Mi - in fact, the only ones I've had that I even consider "good" have been somewhat Americanized (Dickson Wine Bar and the underrated and under-appreciated Ba Bay). Until today, that is. Thanks to Jonathan's recommendation, I've now had what I believe to be the first authentic Banh Mi that I can say, with my European-influenced palate, and with an absolutely clear conscience, is *really, really good*! You don't even need a second one to fill up on, as the size is ample, so both qualitatively and quantitatively, we have ourselves a front runner in the local Banh Mi wars - you could say, if you valued bad puns more than honorable use of language, that this Banh Mi, won me. These three storefronts in Eden Center are less than 100 yards away from each other, and justify a special excursion to experience. I am - *finally* - sold on the merits of this sandwich, and I suspect that in Vietnam, it gets even better than this. Absolutely initialized in Italic in the East Falls Church section of the Virginia Dining Guide, and I'm very much looking forward to a repeat visit, thanks to the recommendation of Jonathan Copeland.
  10. I've been meaning to try out Manila Mart since the Tim Carman review in the Post last year, and finally made it there for lunch today. Manila Mart is tucked away in a shopping center just off of Rt 1 a block north of Behnke's, in between the Korean duo of Gah RhaBreakm and Da Rae Won. Manila Mart is a Filipino market, with a few small aisles of shelf goods, plus a tiny produce section and I think some refrigerated cases along the side. In back, however, is a hot food counter with a small kitchen and a handful of tables for diners. A handwritten sign behind the counter lists the regular menu items and daily specials. The counter includes multiple vats of meats in variously colored sauces, a warming case with several types of cooked fishes and pork, pre-portioned noodle dishes, a pile of bbq skewers, and an array of desserts. About half of the desserts were labeled, the rest of the food was unlabeled, but they were happy to explain what each one was. I got a pancit bihon - vermicelli rice noodles with a mild flavor topped with chicken and veggies, $5.50 - and a halo halo for dessert, $5. The halo halo has shaved ice with various beans, chunks of colored jellies, flan, and something that may have been rice based, with evaporated milk poured over and a scoop of ube (purple yam) ice cream on top. The other meat dishes (mostly chicken and pork from what I could tell) would probably have been more adventurous choices in terms of flavor - I'll have to try that next time, along with the cassava pie. They have a facebook page and instagram that note when special dishes are available. It looks like they may also offer Filipino breakfast on Sunday mornings.
  11. Bourdain to Make Eataly Look Like a Bodega Very big plans from our favorite peripatetic ex-junkie: 09/30/2015 - "Anthony Bourdain's Food Market Takes Shape" by Florence Fabricant on nytimes.com
  12. If you miss the rum buns, you won't have to wait much longer. Bethesda Magazine reports that O'Donnell's is opening a market in Rockville.
  13. I can't find an existing thread. If there is one, please merge. I did not go here, but my wife did, for lunch. Here's what she said 'And I had an absolutely AMAZEBALLS lunch today. AMAZEBALLS. Did you see the picture I texted you? It was horribly expensive for lunch though. But daaaaaamn!' You have to understand, she's in publications and just doesn't talk like this. Apparently, it was a really good lunch.
  14. Souk Bakery and Market was scheduled to soft open in the Hello Cupcake Barracks Row space today (via PoPville).
  15. Northern Virginia magazine reported that Cassatt's owner Art Hauptman opened the market portion of Bistro 360 on Oct. 17 in Cafe Assorti's former location. Although Northern Virginia magazine states that "Hauptman hopes to have the restaurant and wine bar of Bistro 360 open late next week," the Bistro 360 website says that the Bistro360 Eatery will open on Nov. 3 and the wine bar and market are now open.
  16. Happened to be walking by this weekend and saw that Macon is open in the Chevy Chase Arcade building on Connecticut Ave. We had already picked up bagels with the kids so I couldn't do much but pop my head in, but I'll probably get over there for a brunch soon. I can't wait to try the biscuits and bacon gravy with poached eggs and maybe the "spiced watermelon bowl".... Has anyone been yet? When did it open?
  17. Ventured out to Frederick yesterday for brunch at Firestone's, located on the main drag of Market Street. It's gotten a couple quick mentions in the Dining in Frederick thread, but figured I'd expand on it a bit. I was being a temporary teetotaler yesterday so I didn't bother opening the drink menu, but it appears that it has a reputation of being a good bar. The lounge area was quite nice and there was a decent jazz band playing throughout our meal, which was a nice touch. We started off with crab dip, which was served with two small loaves of bread and some carrots and cucumbers. Despite the sherry, the crab dip wasn't too rich and the large amount of cheese made dipping a bit difficult, but it was good. The eggs benedict was a hit and my grandmother, born and raised in New York City on delis, was quite happy with her hot pastrami sandwich. The meat was quite red and lean and she was pleased with it. I decided to spoil myself and get my once-a-year order of biscuits and gravy, which weighed me down (duh! it's biscuits and gravy!) but hit the spot. It probably wasn't the best item to order on the menu, but it caught my eye while I was in the mood. The burgers looked delicious and our waitress also recommended the Frittata, but nobody in our party went with either option. Their website lists a bunch of awards from OpenTable, Frederick Magazine and Wine Spectator. The bottom line is that it's not going to blow you away like Volt, but if you're in downtown Frederick on a whim and wanted a classier meal it wouldn't be a bad choice at all. I'd be interested in going back for an upscale dinner and a night out if I was in the area and the occasion called for it. ------ http://firestonesrestaurant.com/ Firestone's Culinary Tavern 105 North Market Street Frederick, MD 21701 Hours: tues.- sat. 11am-1:30am sun - 10am-1am closed mondays
  18. Reporting on Le Bledo made me think of it. There is a quick-e-mart type Vietnamese store in Centreville that sells Banh Minh called Park and Shop. It is by the 7-11 on 29 near the bowling alley. The sandwiches are 3.50 and are made on fresh baked bread. Worth a try if you are in need of a snack and you are in the area. In fact, they sell the bread for a quarter a roll in a huge box up front. I've been known to pick up several, an onion, a pepper and some frozen sliced rib eye and make some KILLER cheesesteaks.
  19. We ventured through the Chelsea Market on Saturday as it drizzled outside. I bought some food writing pens at Elenise as a present for someone. http://chelseamarket.com/elenisnewyork/ This reminds me of a place that would do well in Old Town. Very expensive cookies, but cute and the buy a blank one with just white icing and decorate it with a pen is a pretty good idea. I am sure they do lots of birthday parties there. Stopped in the Bowery Kitchen Supply and picked up a few things, this was probably one of my favorites in the market. Got some doughnuts from doughnuttery that were good and a sausage and sage roll from the Tuck Shop that was really good. Waited too long to find a restaurant and then things got filled up when a couple of the tours ended, but I saw lots of good looking food. This isn't necessarily a traditional market, it's more like Union Market. Restaurants, prepared foods, some grocery, some kitchen supply, etc. The tours running through it were especially annoying.
  20. A week or two after opening, I just tried Azur -- the new restaurant from Frederik de Pue (of Table) in the Cafe Atlantico space. We love seafood and had high hopes. Unfortunately, we were a bit disappointed. I'll give it a few months and try again. The space is very nice. They've taken the old Cafe Atlantico and installed a french coast / St. Barts style, with medium toned woods, whites, and blues. I think the space is lovely, but found the music unpleasant at times -- a lot of loud, techno-ish music (picture a too-trendy, french nightclub). To start, I had a nice wheat beer, and my guest has a cocktail. Her first attempt at a cocktail was supposed to contain wasabi vodka, black pepper vodka, tomato water, tobasco, and caviar. (Yes, the caviar seemed strange, and the $20 price tag was not justified by the very tiny bit of it on the garnish). The drink was very disappointing. There was no detectable trace of wasabi, pepper, or tobasco. It basically tasted like tomato water, vodka, and fish (presumably from the caviar?). Bland and in need of salt. Upon asking the waitress if perhaps an ingredient was mistakenly omitted, my guest was offered a different drink and got a version of a bees knees that was pretty good. To start: We ordered a tile fish crudo with black lime, pickled cilantro, avocado, white asparagus, and espelette. The lime, espellette, and little blossoms not identified on the menu had nice flavor. But the crudo tasted a bit fishy (presumably not as fresh as a crudo needs to be, although I'm not familiar enough with tile fish to be sure). The avocado was turned into a paste that reminded me of guacamole though needing more flavor. We also had oyster croquettes with black truffle, micro celery, and old bay aioli. The truffle/celery combo was nice. But the croquettes themselves were a bit soggy and overbreaded. For entrees we had scallops with asparagus, pine nut purée, grapefruit sections, puffed red quinoa. The dish sounded very interesting, but I didn't really get how these flavors went together. The puffed quinoa provided nice texture. The scallops were underseasoned (or even unseasoned). We also had tubot with hakurie turnips, celery, grapes, broccoli, and roasted almond espuma. Here I understood the flavor combination (more or less). The turbot was cooked beautifully, well seasoned, and had great flavor. The accompaniments were a mixed bad. The almond espuma was great, and we remarked that we would have preffered a big layer of it rather than just a little dollop on the side. The grapes added nice bursts of sweetness. Some of the vegetables were a bit bland. The turnips, for example, desperately needed salt and acid. The celery and broccoli were a bit better. The best food, by far, was dessert. We had honeyed grapefruit with brown sugar meringue and prosecco granite. The genius of the dish was an ingredient not listed on the menu -- a chiffande of basil. We loved the savory basil flavor against the sweet but cold granite, the firmer meringue, and the softer fruit. The even better dessert was a "strawberry mint salad" with puff pastry crisps and balsamic gelato. The highlight here was the balsamic gelato -- terrific. The strawberries were solid, though had only a tiny bit of mint on it, so the dish was probably not well named. There was also an undescribed cream between the puff pastry crisps. Although the desserts were good, none of the four savory items were standouts, and three had noticeable flaws. I like the space and concept, and I'm really hoping the place hits its stride.
  21. Just went to Trinacria on N. Paca Street for the first time and came away quite happy. in many ways it's like a smaller A. Litteri, with slightly better hours, and they offer a selection of cookies either prepackaged or by the pound. We got a selection of these cookies and the rainbow cookie was divine, perfect almond flavor with raspberry, moist and delicious, and my companion looooved the amaretti, which had a wonderful italian flavor and a strong hint of cinnamon too (i love amaretti, but found the cinnamon offputting). we tried two breads, a circular asiago bread, that was just ok, and an excellent rosemary foccacia. and the tre funghi ravioli, from the frozen selection, were great--the filling was strongly flavored mushrooms mixed with a creamy cheese, with a good pasta to filling ratio.
  22. Hi All, Any idea where a home cook can source either fresh sea urchin or trays of uni? Also, where the hell do I get decent prices on lobster, considering how cheap it supposedly has become wholesale? Thanks, N.
  23. A new, small, local-sourced market opened up on September 29 at the Rockville Town Center. Dawson's Market is apparently named after the Dawson family, who owned the farmed land under the current structure, though they are an off-shoot of a market in Richmond, VA. It is slightly higher-priced for some things compared to WF (ie. Alden's is $7.29 here), but meats are from farms, they carry Trickling Springs dairy, offer Blue Sky cane sugared soda, local farm apples, etc. I was very happy. The only gimmicky thing they are doing is offering these "Envirocredits" if you walk or bike here. Not sure how it pans but might be helpful for some. Free 1 hour parking in its immediate lot. http://www.dawsonsmarket.com/
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