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Found 74 results

  1. This graphic showing ESPN's Top 10 High School Senior basketball rankings is pretty scary, if you don't pull for Duke:
  2. These centers were so dominant that they forced rule changes on the game. Then, they instituted the three-point shot, perhaps as a further deterrent to centers; perhaps as something of a novelty. But regardless of why they did it, I doubt they knew it would change the way the entire game is played. Perhaps the game is better-off now than it ever was, and there's absolutely no reason to undo these rules. Or, perhaps the pendulum has swung too far in the other direction, and it's time to give centers back some authority. I have no answers, only questions, but it's time someone asked the questions. And yes, Stephen Curry would be added to the above list as someone so dominant that he forced yet another rule change. Personally, I think Wilt Chamberlain's "Free-Throw Plane" rule is the most amazing of them all (he was the Big 8 high-jump champion and could triple jump more than 50 feet).
  3. Gee this poor guy is in basketball limbo. Jahlil Okafor has only played in 2 games this year and is awaiting a trade or buyout... Just waiting With lots of turmoil in his career he played decently in his rookie year. Playing time diminished in his second year and now he is a guy awaiting a new team. For a micro second I was thinking the Wizards....but nah. He needs playing time to see if he has a decent career ahead of him "76ers' Jahlil Okafor Remains Hopeful for a Quick Resolution" by Adrian Wojinarowski on espn.com
  4. Don: You have referenced the Capital Classic several times. I never attended one of those games. I have a Reference to those players, though. (Had to research this to get the year). In 1990 I was at a Bullets game that must have been played the day before or after The Capital Classic. At halftime I was on the concourse level when approaching me was a “gaggle” of incredibly tall, remarkably skinny young men. They were the players from the Capital Classic that year. As tall as they were there was one guy who was an astonishing head and shoulders taller than the next tallest players. A “freaky” tall giant among giants. It was Shawn Bradley, at 7’6”, one of the tallest people in the world and one of the 5 or 6 tallest players in NBA history. Freaky tall; stunning. I’ve spent a fair amount of time with a family friend who is 6’7” or 6-8. He is my brother’s life long friend and someone I’ve known since I was about 7 or 8. Shawn Bradley simply dwarfed the players who were 6-7, 6-8, 6-10 or so. Freaky giant in scope. Probably ordered twice the number of beers I’d normally purchase at the concession stand. 😏 Closest I ever got to the Capital Classic
  5. You had a senior moment (with which I'm becoming familiar ) with Bernard King (Albert was a star for the Maryland Terrapins - he and Gene Banks (from Philadelphia - played college ball at Duke) were the best two high school players in the country his senior year - rated higher than even Magic Johnson (I was lucky enough to see all three play in the McDonald's Capital Classic (*))); Bernard (his big brother) was half of the "Bernie and Ernie Show" at University of Tennessee, along with Ernie Grunfeld. I thought sure Albert would be better than Bernard, but it didn't pan out that way - he was a star at Maryland, and, I believe, First Team All-ACC, but he just never hit that mega-stardom I was so sure he'd achieve. (*) I distinctly remember the Program from the Capital Classic that year (though I think my brother absconded with it!) - Earvin Johnson (a 6'9" center from Lansing, MI) had a bio-sketch that I remember the beginning of word-for-word: "Great enthusiasm - cheerleader type. Says he would love to play guard one day ...."
  6. An all time Knick star is impressed by Porzingis Bernard King was a great player, a great Knick, resucited his game with the Bullets, and always played the game with smarts on top of his tremendous skills. His smarts made his skills better. An encouraging comment from a keen student of the game
  7. What five-player team would win you the most games, assuming no substitutions (and no fatigue?) 1 Magic Johnson 2 Michael Jordan 3 Larry Bird 4 and 5 are where it gets tough ... I'm so tempted to go with Duncan at 4, but his assists and scoring were low. And how do you *not* pick Wilt Chamberlain at 5, especially because your team is going to need some rebounds? 4 LeBron James 5 Bill Russell The problem with this is that you only have two *great* shooters (Jordan and Bird). But who in the hell could possibly beat them? You could put Abdul-Jabbar at 3, Russell at 4, and Chamberlain at 5, and probably never lose a game. Damn, what about Johnson, Jordan, Abdul-Jabbar, Russell, and Chamberlain? I'd be interested in hearing from anyone who wouldn't pick Johnson and Jordan in your back court. the J-Team: Jordan, Johnson, Julius, Jason, Jerry, John, James, Jabbar. How do you beat *that*? BTW, my GOAT individual might be a coin flip between Jordan and Chamberlain. I haven't even mentioned Oscar Robertson or Elgin Baylor. And George Mikan was almost as dominant in his era as Wilt Chamberlain was in his. Man oh man, this is an impossible task.
  8. Last month I took a flight from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and the plane wasn't full, but when I walked towards the back, I found there was only one row left with a single person in it, so I nabbed the aisle seat while another gentleman sat by the window (the middle seat being vacant). As soon as I sat down, I glanced over and said to myself, "This guy is an athlete." He was big, and fully dressed in NBA gear - not in a showy way, but in a "this is how I normally dress" way. I told him that all the other rows had two people in it, and that I'd give him plenty of room in the center - he was appreciative, and actually fell asleep for the entire flight - I asked no questions so he could have his privacy. But leaving the plane, I noticed he was sporting a well-worn "Reno Bighorns" backpack - the Bighorns are the NBA G-League team for the Sacramento Kings. Five minutes of research told me I'd been sitting next to Reggie Hearn. I wrote him a brief note on Facebook, wishing him luck, as he's steadily improving each year - he wrote back, and we exchanged a couple cordial notes - it turns out he's a super-nice guy, family oriented, and a starting 6'5" guard for the Bighorns. He asked why I didn't strike up a conversation, and I told him this little anecdote about one time I was in Dulles Airport: "Reggie, I thought you'd enjoy this story: I make a habit of giving celebrities (yes, you're a celebrity) their privacy. One day, I was walking up the ramp at Dulles Airport near Washington, DC, and in the distance, walking towards me, I saw a VERY tall man coming. I said to myself, "This is one of the tallest people I've ever seen," even though he was still about 50 feet away. I purposely didn't stare at him, but when we came to within about 20 feet of each other, an airport porter up above started shouting, "My hero! My hero!" I looked up, and it was KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR! He looked kind of annoyed, like he just wanted to get the heck out of there - I let him have his privacy and didn't even acknowledge him, figuring that's the best gift I could have given him after a long flight. Best regards, Don Rockwell" So, from this point forward, your moderator is an accidental Reggie Hearn fan, and I look forward to following his career going forward - it's kind of scary that someone this good hasn't quite made the leap to the NBA. Reggie Hearn Northwestern Stats on espn.com Reggie Hearn Reno Bighorns highlights on gleague.nba.com
  9. There are a couple things I didn't know about Indiana State's Men's basketball program: * They've played in the NCAA since 1896, making them the oldest program in the nation along with Bucknell, Minnesota, and Washington (who knew?!) * The legendary 1978-1979 team almost wasn't quite so legendary: Against New Mexico State (and remember, there was no 3-point shot then), they were behind 83-81 with 3 seconds remaining, and New Mexico State was at the free-throw line! The shooter missed, Brad Miley got the rebound, and passed to Bob Heaton, who heaved a desperation, 50-foot bank-shot in at the buzzer. Indiana State won the game in overtime.
  10. Friends and I are trying to watch basketball tonight but can't think of a place that has both TVs and decent drinks. Somewhere in Logan/Shaw would be ideal, but relatively flexible. Ideas? Only place we could think of was Riggsby, but that's not really a sports bar.
  11. Lonzo Ball, I fear, is somewhat overrated, has too much baggage, and might be a disappointment in the NBA. Look at his stat line this year: 14.6 points, 6 rebounds, 7.6 assists. That's very impressive, especially for a freshman, and especially in the assists category. However, his shooting technique is extremely flawed, and he's not mature enough to tell his father to back off. Yes, he can shoot an open 3, but his free-throw percentage this year is 67.3% - think about that for a moment. He's big and quick, he can jump, and he can pass very well, but he is a big risk - my dark side hopes the Lakers pass on him at #2, just to irk his father. I believe Lonzo Ball will be a good NBA player, but I'm not convinced he'll be the superstar his father claims he already is. Feb 1, 2017 - "Why Lonzo Ball Isn't the Surefire NBA Superstar Some People Seem To Think He Is" by Colin Ward-Henninger on cbssports.com
  12. "Lonzo Ball's Younger Brother Scores 92 Points in High School Game" on abcnews.go.com He scored 41 points in the 4th quarter.
  13. Did we really not have a thread on Wilt Chamberlain? I don't have much to say that hasn't already been said, but I'd like to list for everyone Chamberlain's single-season rebounds-per-game average in the playoffs over the course of three different decades: 1959-1960: 25.8 1960-1961: 23.0 1961-1962: 26.6 1963-1964: 25.2 1964-1965: 27.2 1965-1966: 30.2 1966-1967: 29.1 1967-1968: 24.7 1968-1969: 24.7 1969-1970: 22.2 1970-1971: 20.2 1971-1972: 21.0 1972-1973: 22.5 If I had to name five athletes of the 20th century who had the most imposing statistics, in any sport, Wilt Chamberlain would be on that list.
  14. Selected in the 2013 NBA draft with the #15 pick in the first round by the Milwaukee Bucks, Giannis Antetokounmpo is a name you may not yet know, but may be forced to learn to spell and pronounce sometime in the near future. Born in Greece to Nigerian immigrant parents, Antetokounmpo is more commonly known by his American nickname, an embarrassing term which speaks more about Americans than him (you can find it easily on the internet; I refuse to go along with it even though it's more laziness than malice). This is a very obscure statistic, and it's surely one that was made up to demonstrate what a complete season Antetokounmpo is having for Milwaukee, but this year, he could become the first player in NBA history to average (take a deep breath) ... 20 points-per-game, 9 rebounds, 5 assists, 2 steals, and 2 blocks. Granted, that's a tailor-made statistic, but it *does* reflect what an all-around player this man is - he is the Bucks' *playmaker*, just as often playing point guard as small forward, and he's 6'11". Pundits are saying that Antetokounmpo is "Next" - and what they mean by that is: After the James's, Currys, etc. step down, who will fill their shoes? They're saying that Giannis Antetokounmpo is going to be in that group - remember him: You'll be glad you did. "Add Buzzer-Beater to Antetokounmpo's Superstar Résumé" by Ohm Youngmisuk on espn.com
  15. In this post, I justifiably poked fun at the sports media for proclaiming every "next great thing" as "The [X] Jordan" - Harold Miner was "Baby Jordan," Tamir Goodman was "Jewish Jordan," etc. Len Bias could have been the next Michael Jordan, and was quite possibly the only player I've ever seen in my life who was *that good*. Like when the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded, I remember exactly where I was, and exactly what I was doing, when I heard the news of Len Bias's tragic death - the two events happened only six-months apart. To young people today: I realize it's premature to even infer such a thing, but Len Bias was one of the greatest college basketball players I've ever seen. When he was drafted by the Boston Celtics, and then died from an overdose of crack cocaine, none other than Red Auerbach (who said he'd been planning for *three years* to draft Bias for the Celtics), said the city of Boston had not been so shocked since the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Larry Bird, who had urged the Celtics to select Bias, and who had uniquely made plans to attend the Celtics' rookie camp to work with him, said, "It's horrible. It's the cruelest thing I ever heard." At 6'8", Bias was bigger and stronger than Jordan, and had everything you could possibly ask for in someone of that height. He had no weaknesses that couldn't have been fixed in short order, and when I'm in my old age, I will be telling this same story. Len Bias had all the tools he needed to be one of the greatest basketball players who ever lived. It isn't so much that he would have been the *next* Jordan; it's that he would have been Jordan's primary competition: Just as we had Bird and Magic, we would have had Jordan and Bias - he *was* *that* *good*. "Remembering Len Bias 30 Years After His Death: 'He Was It.'" by Cindy Boren on washingtonpost.com
  16. One player who may not belong on this list, but was an *amazing* finisher given his physical attributes was Muggsy Bogues. I mentioned somewhere that I saw him play for the DC team in the 1983 McDonald's Capital Classic (click on "About," then "Final Scores" for some fun pictures), and he was the MVP in leading the Metro All-Stars to a two-point victory over the US All-Stars. Now, that does not a pro make, and it certainly doesn't put him on any all-time Best Finishers list, but it did give me a fairly intimate view of his incredible driving capabilities - he was like this little black dot, twisting and torsing through the air like a knuckleball, somehow managing to get off a shot under the outstretched arm of some pedigreed future NBA All-Star. My guess is that in a 23'9" race (which is the distance from the 3-point arc to the basket), he's one of the fastest people in NBA history. Anyway, does he belong on the "Best Finishers" list? Probably not, but it's worth at least giving him a nod. After posting this, I went to check if Bogues was by any chance the all-time leader in "Steals per Minute," and although I could only find the "Steals per Game" statistic, he isn't even close: he's number 72 on the list with an average of 1.54 steals per game. One thing I did notice was that in the elite group of 14 players who averaged over 2 steals per game, Allen Iverson is number 10, and that reminded me that Iverson was perhaps just as quick as Bogues (Iverson was certainly faster, but I'm defining "quick" as explosive speed in the first few steps (Russell Westbrook is *quick*)). As an aside, I was shocked to see none other than Michael Jordan at #4 (!), and John Stockton (!) at #9 - astoundingly, George McGinnis averaged more steals per game than Gary Payton. I'll close with a very obscure fact: Every Hall of Famer who has averaged over 2 steals per game was a guard; Rick Barry, a small forward who was the same height as shooting guard Clyde Drexler, came in just under the mark with 1.99 steals per game - apologies to Muggsy (one of the all-time great nicknames) for straying off-topic in this paragraph. Heck, I'll throw this in too: In the 1981-1982 and 1982-1983 seasons, Dunbar High School in Baltimore went 60-0, ending up ranked #1 in the nation by USA Today.
  17. "It's Showtime: Why The Cavs and Warriors in the NBA Finals is the Best Thing for Basketball" by Anthony J. Fredella on straighthoops.com
  18. It took all the strength I could muster to start a thread on Matthew Dellavedova, but I just found this: 01/18/16 - "Cavs' Matthew Dellavedova Voted NBA's Dirtiest Player in L.A. Times' Poll" by Ricky Doyle on nesn.com Anyone who thinks Dellavedova is "accidentally dirty," as one coach said in that article, didn't watch the game I saw.
  19. A thread to mark the passing of Dwayne "Pearl" Washington at the age of 52. In the early-to-mid 80s there was no league bigger than the Big East - Patrick Ewing, John Thompson, Chris Mullen, Villanova's upset win over Georgetown in the NCAA final, the annual Big East Tournament at the Garden. And Syracuse had a 6 foot 2 point guard named Pearl Washington. His trademark "shake and bake" style left defenders flat footed. And his buzzer beater against Boston College in 1984 sealed his place as a Syracuse legend. Tribute by Syracuse Sports Columnist Bud Poliquin ESPN Tribute
  20. In the midst of the NBA playoffs, the Warriors have beaten the Houston Rockets twice; once in which Stephen Curry played only 20 minutes, lit up the scoring, then got hurt and sat for the rest of the rout(game). In the 2nd match up, Curry didn't play due to injury...opening up tremendous opportunities for Houston. Didn't pan out though as the Golden State Warriors won again, even without Curry. Of course there could be a variety of reasons for the results...but one suggestion is that James Harden's defense is simply not that stellar. Below a video of some of his shining moments on defense: "Great Moments in James Harden Defensive History" on espn.go.com
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