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Found 71 results

  1. First time at Fox's Den on Main Street in Annapolis. solid gastropub from same folks as Level and Vida Taco. Shared salad, meatballs and pizza. All were solid. Will go back as there as no wait and the food was solid.
  2. Happened upon the newest food, grocery, condo block or two in Sterling, Virginia recently - had been to the CAVA there several times, but missed this place as it was not open. Lunch was not particularly busy but the way this complex is set up a block off Leesburg Pike (Route 7) it is a destination. There is a Harris Teeter and several other restaurants (Chuy's) in the immediate area. I saw signs for a Coal fired pizza coming soon as well. Miller's Ale House is tucked in the middle so if you blink you could miss it. There is green space in front with some kids games and benches so it appears to be used regularly. Lunch was great. Have a decent mix of salads and sandwiches, I opted for a burger as their description sounded pretty good and it was. Service was spot on and drinks refilled promptly. Atmosphere is more of the contemporary bar/restaurant feel with high exposed vents and gray ceiling acoustic tiles. The booths and bar area were nicely spaced and they had plenty of seating. I am sure the place will fill up and get busier as the condos there sell and the immediate population increases. They have outdoor seating as well, but due to the heat, I think everyone preferred the AC. After you enjoy a meal there walk out the front door directly across the courtyard to Colada Shop for a great coffee. Heard their Cuban sandwiches are great, but have not been back to try one yet. Anyplace that has Cafe con Leche and Cuban coffee is worth a stop.
  3. [The first 9 posts in this thread were originally responses to this Little Serow post, but the topic has become expansive and interesting enough where it merits its own thread. Cheers, DR] Lol, a bit of a random question. Which I welcome! I would be shocked if there isn't a nearby liquor store in Dupont Circle, for cryin' out loud. That said, I would be also somewhat shocked if they also sold "single serves" of beers, which many ANCs pushed to restrict, since it often leads to unregulated "outside bars" of people just loitering and drinking them on the street. Of course, now if they are craft fancy beers, they seem to find a way. So, good luck on "a can or bottle." I would love to hear about your motivation.
  4. With its nice long bar and large sunny windows, The Vanderbilt is the kind of place you want to go to for an afternoon drink. We enjoyed a glass of the Forstreiter Gruner Veltliner 2013 ($9) and the Aizipurua Getariako Txakolina 2015 ($12). They were serving a limited prix fixe menu because of Mother's Day but we did enjoy our plate of cottage fries ($6). The vibe of The Vanderbilt is more upscale neighborhood restaurant with prices to match. But not a bad place to spend an hour or so on a late Sunday afternoon after wandering around the Brooklyn Museum.
  5. After dinner at my fave' Ghibellina, stopped by the new bar Kingfisher, on my way back to my car, b/c I had to park all the way by the Pig. It's down in the basement, true neighborhood bar, not even dealing with the gastropub or any sort of menu options at all, except for free popcorn and some expensive beef jerky. They have a very strong beer draft list, some canned wines, fun cocktails. If you are hungry for other foods, you can order delivery or just bring what you want in. We walked into the beginning of trivia night (they use "Geeks Who Drink") and played a half a game (our group, "Better Late Than Pregnant" were 3rd of 11 at halftime), but I was turning into a pumpkin so we left before the game was over. I love it - very few of these exist any more. Felt like a bunch of friends got together and said, "Let's open a bar that feels like our basement". Very cozy. Reasonable prices. They have bingo night, too. Will see you there! ** Oh - the name has nothing to do with India or the Indian beer. They had a hard time finding a name for a bar, so they figured they'd go for a bird's name. They got a book and saw a really cool looking bird, and said, "Boom! That's what we're calling this joint". They do not serve Kingfisher but b/c of all the questions, they may offer it at some point.
  6. Kingfisher has been open since the summer. I went in shortly after opening, and the guy behind the bar told me that they wanted to build a neighborhood bar on 14th Street, and that they hoped to tune the TVs behind the bar to nerdier things (like Godzilla movies) than muted sporting events. After half a year of it open, I like just about everything but their happy hour: the free popcorn is great, the beer list (cans only, no drafts, like Red Derby) is pretty well-curated, and it's a really nice place to meet people for a drink, but the happy hour offerings (particularly in the way of beer) are pretty meager. Otherwise, it's a really nice place and a very welcome low-key addition to a perhaps overly buzzy neighborhood.
  7. Tonight's meal was brought to you by the letter B as well as S. Bad service , boys & girls, cancels out a great meal everytime. I often equate it to a bad review. I could read 100 reviews ,but that one bad one will sit heavy with me. The Cove in York has one less patron. Let me start off with the good stuff,though. A bowl of cream of crab,by far is the best deal in town at $4.99. Large bits of backfin crab is abundant throughout the savory blend of cream& spices. I asked the surly bartender what he recommended as a restaurant fav, and the service staff jumped at the opportunity to reccomend the Cantina Nachos. The nachos can be topped off with an array of protein options. I chose the brisket. Wow , just wow. I was blown away when the dish was served. A long oblong plate stacked high with fatty goodness. Housemade chips piled high with beef brisket accented by an abundance of jalepenos, black beans, scallions,tomatoes, and gooey cheddar cheese.It would have been made a bit more perfect if a sprinkling of chopped cilantro made an appearance. But thats me.But my dear followers, thats where the perfection ended. I was really trying to give the bartender the benefit of my doubt, but he failed miserably. I watched him reach into a ice bin with a glass tumbler. Irresponsible. But more importantly , he didnt even bother to greet me once I sat down. Whats the average time a bartender greets a patron? He made eye contact, walked away from me to pour a glass of wine. Still no greeting& or acknowledgement. Not off to a good start. The service when downhill from there. Everytime I asked him a question, he acted indifferent,& bothered by my request. I wasn't his only victim of the evening. I watched him give bad service to just about anyone in listening range. I wanted to like this place, I really did, but bad service cancels out great food everytime. disappointed, kat
  8. In honor of Michel Richard, who left California I understand because diners ignored his menu and instead asked for healthy blah food like grilled fish on a bed of lettuce, my first stop in California was for a nice burger. Father's Office definitely delivered, this is a serious burger. According to wikipedia and consistent with my own memory, it is the "Office Burger, a patty of fine dry-aged beef topped with caramelized onions, Gruyère and Maytag cheeses, applewood-smoked bacon compote and arugula served on a soft roll." I also got a side of sweet potato fries, which represented quite well. It was fairly brisk on a Tuesday evening. The place is a bit dark (that's why I couldn't identify everything on the burger) but definitely worth the stop in Santa Monica.
  9. Mythology is now (soft) open at 816 H Street NE. The concept has been in the works for years and comes from former Atlas Room GM (and Mark & Orlando's owner) Mark Medley with his business partner Todd Luongo. Mythology opened quietly last night. With little fanfare, Mythology lined up the talented Chef Joseph Harran (formerly of Woodward Table, Bistro Bis and Vidalia) to operate the kitchen. If you don't know Chef Harran (and I did not), note that our fearless leader DonRocks has described him here as "exceptionally talented" and a "Top 20 Chef in the city." Our preview meal confirmed Don's informed opinion and was quite delicious and well-executed. We particularly enjoyed the blue crab toast appetizer, the scallops and steak (w/bone marrow) entrées, and the playful "coffee and tea" dessert. The second floor lounge area and roof decks of the building and concept remain under construction, but Mythology is open for dinner now and likely to add brunch and the upstairs bar/lounge space in the coming months. Some aspects of the Mythology theme were not to our taste, but we will be back again for another very good meal soon. Mythology is an instant contender on H Street, IMHO -- Chef Harran in back and Mark in front is a very strong combination and elevates the competition for quality dining here in NE DC.
  10. "German Restaurant Takes Signed Trump Photo Down after Barrage of Yelp Complaints" by Ken Meyer on mediaite.com
  11. Good tacos (non-traditional tacos), fantastic beer list, and they serve their entire menu until 1:30 am.
  12. Funny, I had an Americano (a large comes with four shots - they use a California roaster with a multi-syllabic name beginning with "D") in Del Ray just two days ago, at the pleasant Emma's Espresso and Wine Bar. I didn't try any of the baked goods, but the Americano was very well made, served in a ginormous (that didn't activate the spell-check alert?) mug, and was quite a good cup of coffee. The first few moments of service were addled, but instantly rectified themselves, and the staff there was as pleasant as can be. They have free WiFi, and Emma's is well-worth a visit if you enjoy independent coffee houses. They own the entire house, right off Mount Vernon Avenue, so there's ample parking.
  13. We were excited to try Brick and Mortar after Eater named it one its five finalists for Philly 2015 restaurant of the year - along with Aldine, one of our best dining experiences in the city so far. After dining there last night, I can tell you the inclusion on that list does Aldine a great disservice. Brick and Mortar is housed in the first floor of the Goldtex apartment building - it's an oddly shaped, generic space that is really devoid of any character whatsoever. There's an enormous TV that had sports on when we got there although to their credit they did turn it off once the dinner crowd really started to roll in. This restaurant continues an annoying trend of playing loud pop music while you're trying to enjoy dinner. They have a number of crescent-shaped tables that are totally awkward and make you feel like you entire party is sitting on the same side of the table - they tried to jam us into one and then made kind of a big deal about accommodating our request to sit at a regular 4-top. The food is your standard charcuterie, cheese boards, small plates, yada, yada that you see everywhere these days. I would say everything we ate was enjoyable though nothing to write home about. The oysters were just OK, the lamb was pretty nice, as were the rock shrimp. All in all, just not a standout restaurant - there are plenty of better places to go.
  14. No, but it's now open, and here are the website and current menus. Note that there's a pop-up window advertising heritage turkey dinners (complete dinners) to go for Thanksgiving this year - they're asking you to order early (note to NRG: That window is showing up every time you click on something on the website - it would be nice if you saw it only once). Dinner: Charcuterie: Beer: Drinks and Wine:
  15. Matt and I went to Blue Pit BBQ on Saturday night after a few beers at Union with some friends who recommended it. I thought the BBQ was definitely up there, better than anything I have had in the DC area for ribs and pulled pork. I thought the smoke level was good, I liked the rib rub, it was so good you didn't really even need sauce. I wouldn't have minded a spicier bbq sauce for the pork, but I ended up really liking their mustard sauce with the pork actually. Our friends didn't care for the bratwurst, of course they are from Minnesota and their parents make bratwurst so... I liked the sides, the collards tasted like collards, but were cooked down nicely. I wasn't crazy about the potato salad, I thought the potatoes were a bit under cooked, however the flavor was there. I really liked one of the coleslaws, I think it was the MD seasoning one. The cornbread was really good. They also had a great bar selection of whiskeys and bourbons, I had a Frisky Kitty cocktail that was good. A nice can beer list too, Matt had something from San Francisco he really likes, but can't find often. All in all a very good stop, especially after drinking some beer.
  16. Met up with some friends on Friday night to try Smokehouse Live in Leesburg. No better way I can think of to describe this place than suburban Hill Country - same system, same basic theme, very similar menus. The good - The bar area here is bright and very open with friendly service, a limited bar menu and good happy hour prices. Nice selection of bourbons, some cocktails during happy hour for $5 and a tap selection that goes beyond the Shiner limitations of HC downtown. But then... The rest - Hill Country (normally I would say so many comparisons to HC would be unfair, but they don't seem to even be trying to hide the imitation, so...) somehow manages to pull off sticking a room full of bench tables together and have it not seem totally cold and impersonal. Smokehouse Live can't say the same - plywood walls, disjointed floor plan and an oddly cramped 'market' ordering area made me miss some cheap and tacky kitsch and finished hardwood. But hey, you're here for the barbeque, right? The pulled pork was ok - not awesome, but not bad - wished it had more bbq flavor. I will admit - I order lean brisket - and am used to this being a bit more on the dry side than the 'wet' orders, but this was so dry it was crumbling apart. The beef shoulder (crod) is just a hard cut to work with - even after trimming visible tough areas I still had trouble chewing (not sure this is as much the restaurants fault as just a tough cut). Texas Chainsaw sauce was ok, though could have used more heat for being the 'spicy' version; eastern carolina was a little close to being straight vinegar for me. Please, for the love of God, if you only read one sentence in this write up, read this one: A 16oz portion of collard greens will cost you $14.25. Just to make sure we didn't miss anyone there - A 16oz portion of greens will cost you $14.25. Now to be fair, your little order card does list the price for each side in tiny little numbers inside the bubbles. Generally being a person who is not so concerned with price that I thought a side order of collard greens for two people might break me, I didn't really pay attention - after all, its a side of greens and some turkey that was left over from the day before. I would love to see their food cost for this. Or for the $14.25 portion of macaroni and cheese. Or for the $14.25 portion of lima beans and corn. But moving on... It was our server's first day, or at least appeared to be, so I hold her completely blameless but when you are half way through your meal and still do not have someone take your drink order, AND when you have flagged down three different staff members begging for drinks and then a manager, AND when you give you drink order to all three of these staff members never to see said drinks, it gets old. I'll still never understand why, when the new server finally appeared, she made an Arnold Palmer using Mountain Dew, but at this point I was beyond questioning. Bottom line - would totally go back for happy hour at the bar and listen to some music, but the dinner experience was approaching 'one-and-done' levels of not good. P.s. didn't want to start a new topic for a restaurant so far out that wasn't good, but please feel free to move as needed
  17. Although not food (google Monk's diet), it is important to note that Flying Dog Brewery now can serve pints for consumption on site, and they have built a really nice outdoor beer garden.
  18. Being new to donrockwell.com I decided to look around and see what I could find about the places in my neighborhood. I was a little surprised that there were not any posts about Sixth Engine even though they've been open for over three years now. Perhaps that's because it wallows in mediocrity. Don't get me wrong, they've always had a consistently good brunch and well cooked burgers. The problem for me is that much of the rest of the menu has always been a little 'heavy handed' when it comes to ingredients and sauces. Thankfully, the chef who opened the place, Paul Madrid, has left and things are starting to get better. Additions like the arugula salad and roasted cauliflower with "Ling Sauce", which is very much a sweeter General Tso's sauce, have injected life back into the menu. Hopefully they will continue down this path. The bar program, on the other hand, came flying out of the gate and hasn't lost its momentum. Draft beers rotate regularly to highlight the best of the season and the bartenders take pride in not only making the drinks, but also the ingredients, creating custom shrubs and tonics to use in their creations. While I realize the latter can be found at craft cocktail bars all over the city, it's surprising to find in a place that has the vibe of a glorified TGI Fridays. The layout is more on par with the food than the bar program. Do not go there if you're looking for a quiet evening. The bar bleeds into the downstairs dining area and with TVs in both, it can quickly become a situation where you have to yell at the person across the table from you in order for them to hear you easily. The beautiful upstairs dining room has exposed brick walls and hardwood floors that echo all of the activity in the kitchen that adjoins it. Surprisingly the outdoor patio is the least noisy of the three even with the traffic on Mass Ave just a few feet away. There are a plethora of tables and the service is good. The sun us really the only enemy. During happy hour you're fine and in the shade while the sun scorches Philos' patio across the street. During brunch though you are in the sun's crosshairs and it will roast you at your table even with umbrellas in place to help prevent that. At the end of the day Sixth Engine is a nice place to get a drink and maybe have something to eat if it speaks to you. Otherwise, have a few drinks and walk around the corner to Wise Guy Pizza and score a slice of pie.
  19. I will be taking the Executive Chef role at Barrel and Crow in Bethesda. We plan to offer regional American food mostly in the the $18 to $24 range for dinner, along with a couple items in the $30 range. We are looking to be a great neighborhood restaurant for people to come to and enjoy some great comforting food and drink, at a decent price point. We are hoping to open in about 4 weeks with a little luck. I have attached a sample of the opening dinner menu, still haven't tested everything yet so there could be some small changes. Barrel and Crow Opening Dinner Menu.pdf
  20. This is the 6 year old reincarnation of what used to be the Last Chance Saloon, in the Oakland Mills Shopping Center on the east side of old school Columbia. It is a neighborhood pub. It is homey. Food is acceptable, but not creative. Food can be hit or miss though. Service is ok. Fairly inexpensive. Usually have 10 to 12 beers on tap. A rotating selection of maybe 50 to 100 bottled beers is good. It's cheaper than Victoria Gastro Pub. It serves booze as well, possibly unlike Frisco Taphouse. It has ample parking, unlike those two other places. Is it someplace I would seek out to dine? No. But if I want a burger, or fish & chips or a fairly decent pile of onion rings and get some good beer to catch up with friends as a sort of midpoint between Laurel and Baltimore? Sure.
  21. I happen to walk by here almost every day on my way to the Clarendon metro. Posting because noticed their soft opening last week one night and from cheesepowder's post. Their FB page states they will open *today* at 11:30am. Parking won't be easy, since it's at the corner of 11th street north and North Highland. Citizen Burger Bar 1051 North Highland Street Arlington, VA
  22. For some reason, I recall hearing The Salted Pig is a good place to dine at, but can't recall from where or why.
  23. Wedged between Public Bar and Shake Shack, in the nebulous area between Dupont Circle and Downtown, is the month-old Sauf Haus Bier Hall, the hottest, noisiest place I've been to in years. Read on ... If you got a knock on the head, and woke up inside of Sauf Haus on a busy night, you might briefly think you were at Eighteenth Street Lounge. I passed a young customer-counter outside, then walked up long flight of stairs to get there (it's on top of Shake Shack), and immediately got in a three-person line for what turned out to be a surprisingly nice unisex restroom. As I reached the front of the line, a rather desperate-looking young girl asked me if she could go in and quickly wash her hands, and I said of course (props to her because she really was in there for about fifteen seconds, giving me a thankful nod on the way out). But it's odd to me why someone here would want to wash their hands because this place is a *dive*! There is but one plausible explanation which I shall address in a moment. Sauf Haus was packed, and I mean Eighteenth Street Lounge packed, so I was stunned to see one, single barstool available, and nabbed it pronto (thus not seeing the rooftop patio and bar). It was very hot in there, perhaps eighty degrees, so a cold beer was starting to sound awfully good. This was a very young, boisterous crowd, probably averaging in their late 20s, and with very few people over 40. Umm ... Which is why I was so surprised - no, make that shocked - to see their beer selection. All-German, and 16 taps pumping out ice-cold half-liters and liters of some very worthy beers - names like Stiegl, Franziskaner, Weihenstephaner, Hoffbrau, and Spaten (which my auto-correct just changed to Spittoon). Honestly, I thought I counted 18 taps when I was there, but everywhere I fact-checked online says 16, so we'll go with that number for now. Not immediately realizing how German this place was in spirit, I ordered a "pint" of König Ludwig Dunkel Weiss ($8), and got served my beer perfectly poured into a Weizen glass. Yes, it was served too cold, but it was hot enough in the bar where you wanted your beer nice and frosty. I'm not sure how many decibels were flying around Sauf Haus last night, but have you ever seen those conversion tables? The ones where 30db equal a quiet library whisper at 6 feet distance? Well, this would have come out somewhere between a motorcycle and a sandblaster - I was also shocked to see the sign that said "60 Maximum Capacity," although the room was not all that large, so 50 people bouncing their shouts off the walls can make a lot of noise. They have sausages on the menu here which, I believe, are locally sourced, but the thing that attracted my attention (recall now the young girl washing her hands) was the large, blue, circular plastic tray on my left which contained the single largest pretzel I've ever seen. This pretzel was so big that if you unraveled it, it would probably be about a yard long, and it had the thickness of a russet potato, or a girl's arm. Looking at the menu, I saw these pretzels in addition to the sausages, and they sell three sizes: 1) two little ones, 2) a one-pound pretzel, and 3) a two-pound pretzel. Yes, a two-pound pretzel - for twenty dollars! Apparently, these are baked at Heidelberg Pastry Shoppe, and having been to Heidelberg dozens of times before, I believe it. I'm assuming the pretzel on my left was the two-pounder, but quite frankly, I'm surprised it only weighs two pounds. I finished most of my beer, then hopped off my barstool, headed back down the stairs, and went out into the night.
  24. Some publications list Fette Sau as having the best barbeque in NYC, and based on my one experience I don't have any reason to argue that claim. Walking in, the bar to the left hosts a most impressive display of whiskey - the website claims they have the best list of American whiskey in New York City. We just ordered some pitchers to drink in line, which were almost gone by the time we got to the front 20-30 minutes later. Tip- don't go on a rainy night because the long line will leave you out in the elements, uncovered by the roof. Most of the outdoor seating area is covered, but the walkways are not. There's plenty of large picnic tables inside as well, community seating being the way to go. The meats are ordered by the pound and are cut and served up for you right there at the counter. Take your tray (or trays) back to a table and dig in. I noticed on the menu that they list the farms that some of the animals are from as well as a few other food sources. Sticking to the classics, we had brisket and pulled pork, but everything in the window looked phenomenol. Off of memory, the other meats offered when we went were pork belly, sausages, baby back ribs, and pork short ribs. Of the sides, we stuck with burnt end baked beans (what it sounds like) and potato salad while plenty of rolls were provided with everything. The meat was succulent, juicy and smokey while still keeping the great meat flavor. (Side brag - my friend/roommate sincerely said he thought my brisket was better, but that's not to take away from their process) The baked beans were awesome, loved how the burnt ends worked in there, and the potato salad gave us a nice body as well. We gorged on everything, the only words spoken were about how good the food was, and we could have eaten much, much more - that should speak for itself. Executive summary: If you're craving BBQ in New York City, go to Fette Sau - you won't be disappointed. They could stand with the majority of legit BBQ places throughout the rest of the country in places actually known for their BBQ.
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