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Found 50 results

  1. A little bird told me this is coming soon: "Washington's Vegan Dining Scene Is About To Get a Boost" by Becky Krystal on washingtonpost.com
  2. Boundary Road hosted a pop-up this past Sunday night, and SMN just killed it. I am really looking forward to the opening. Chef Sam had a couple other guys helping him out for the pop-up, including Chef Brad at BR and Chef Erik from TU/Maketto. They offered about 7 small plates and 2 desserts, my friend and I ordered the entire menu. Braised goat in a smoked pepper raita was the standout for me, as was the poached sablefish with escabeche. Veggies were also a large focus of the menu, I particularly liked the pan roasted radishes. Desserts were also excellent, a carrot and orange ice cream SCOOP (not quinelle) with a maple pizzelle, and a flourless almond cake in pear compote. Plateware was thoughtful, similar to R'sL. Pickles and acid play a consistent theme in the dishes, but always playing a complementary role to the main ingredient. The fingerling potatoes in pork fat, for example, look just like little sausages served over the sauerkraut, that dish worked really nicely for me as well. Currently, H Street NE has a couple of excellent restaurants, a smattering of fine ones, and a deluge of okay places. With the almost concurrent opening of SMN and Maketto, I hope that more venues with focused concepts will try to hang a shingle in the neighborhood, and help create a brand of thoughtful restaurants on the strip.
  3. I'm always on the hunt for good falafel/shawarma in the DC area. Not a huge Amsterdam Falafel fan; prefer Pita Hut in Rockville. I went with a buddy for lunch today to the month old Shawafel in the Atlas District. The address is 1322 H St NE. I had the falafel/shawarma sandwich, which came with lettuce, pickles, tomatoes, pickled turnips, mint, and tahini. Everything is made in house. The sandwich was absolutely incredible and blew all competition out of the water. The space is really well laid out, extremely clean, and Alberto the owner couldn't have been nicer. All meats are spit roasted and the sandwiches are more "laffa" style then in a pita. We also shared an order of labneh, which tasted super fresh, and an order of fries, which are hand cut. Great new addition for DC's fast casual scene!
  4. I always get excited at the possibility of good Cajun/Creole food. For years, I worked at a place in the Atlanta suburbs called Comeaux's - the owner was from Lafayette and the food was amazing, and it set my expectations pretty high. I have yet to find crawfish etouffee (outside of Louisiana) that matched the version I would routinely eat after my shift. So, Jason and I visited Po Boy Jim last Friday night, and I worked pretty hard to temper myself. The two-story space is nice - we ate at the bar upstairs. Service was good - the staff seem pretty enthusiastic about the restaurant and its potential. The beer list was pretty lackluster (only 5 taps, 3 of which were not very good for summer), but the bartender actually took time to listen to our suggestions and jot down some notes - again, they really seem like they want to hear feedback and implement positive changes. The food was quite good. We started with a "flight" of wings - 3-4 each of three different flavors. The wings themselves were somewhat small, but they were pretty meaty and the sauces/rubs were tasty. I liked the dry Jerk version the best, and hubby liked the Carolina BBQ. We each had an oyster po'boy - I got the original/classic, and Jason got the Buffalo version. They were both delicious. The bread was really nicely grilled, which gave the whole sandwich an almost smoky note. The oysters were plump and well seasoned/fried. The onion rings were awesome - big and thick, which is my preference, but also crispy and well-salted. Fries were less impressive, but still hot and tasty. Jason raved about the buffalo sauce - he was sopping up every last drop with the fries. Some people have complained about the prices, but considering the large portion sizes, I thought they were fine. The chef (and owner, I think?) came out to apologize for our wings taking longer than usual, and to ask what we thought about the food, which was nice. It's definitely not a diet-friendly place to eat, but I can see us going back to try more of the menu choices.
  5. (Search returned nothing and I don't recall seeing a thread, so here goes) I had a lovely dinner (with a large group, none the less) at the new Liberty Tree last night. Pizza and small plates on H street, I believe they've been open a whole two weeks or so now. It feel strange to tout the virtues of a salad, but the "rare tuna" was pretty wicked. Spinach, Kalamata, white beans, topped with seared tuna with some pine nuts. Seriously, best salad in a while. And the salads come in two sizes, thank you very much (I hate not knowing if it's going to be huge or small...at least with two sizes you can have some idea if you're ordering as a starter versus a main). Margherita pizza with prosciutto, also pretty darned yummy. I snuck a bite of the bread pudding (didn't leave room for more than that) and it was seriously good. The kicker? Noticeably affordable. Our bill came and my friend and I had to laugh because her two bottles of Lambic ($12 each, which I think seems pretty normal since they're at TJ's for $10) came to a full half of our dinner check. I'm excited, this place is good. I think it's going to be crowded when word gets out.
  6. Bullfrog Bagels did a few pop-ups around the city, but has now opened a permanent store on one side of the Star and Shamrock bar on the East end of H St. I stopped in around 8:30 this morning, and there was a line of about 18 people. The selection today included all the standard bagels as well as a reasonable looking bialy. I needed to get in and out quickly, so decided against any of the breakfast sandwiches (egg & cheese, lox, smoked whitefish, etc.), and got a sesame and everything bagel to go, with sides of scallion/chive and smoked salmon cream cheese. The little guy got a bialy. The everything bagel was indeed everything. Almost, but not quite too salty (which is the perfect amount of salty for a bagel), with a shiny, dark brown outside and perfectly chewy inside. This was a damn fine bagel. The sesame looked like it could've used a few more minutes in the oven, and was a bit pale and soft on the outside. Overall, it was still a pretty good bagel, but didn't compare to the other. I'm not much of a bialy expert, but this one at least looked like the ones I remember from NYC. Nice softened onions and poppy seeds filled the middle. Given the crowd, they're definitely filling a need. Another day, another quality opening on H St.
  7. I just got word that hiring has begun at VEDGE. Please forward resumes to careers@vedgerestaurant.com. More details to follow as I learn of them. I am so excited about this opening more than any other restaurant. Here in Lancaster, both Vedge , along with V street are a local favorite to vegetarians, and carnivores alike. Makes me kind of wish I live back in the District. Almost. Just the messenger, kat
  8. I do know @EricTollar continues to work on opening the restaurant at 400 H. Don't have many details besides something like 12 taps, plans for craft cocktails and a menu as stated above. I believe they are "close" to opening. I also think Mr. Tollar above has a pretty good craft cocktail background.
  9. Just got this email off the dc-beer email list: Props to Thomas Cizauskas for the info. Will definitely be interesting to see how this place develops, maybe a good spot for a meal before a show at Rock and Roll Hotel? That area is still pretty rough, though, and it's a pain in the ass to get there without a car. Still, very interesting...
  10. I'm looking for a place to eat before a show at the Rock and Roll Hotel next week. Suggestions? Despite our reasonable proximity to H Street, we have not yet been there, nor to the Argonaut, or any of the other new nightspots that have opened . The Argonaut struck me as the best spot to try. The other option I'd thought of is Granville Moore's. (I wasn't sure which thread to put this in. I don't see a general H Street/Atlas District thread.) The Rock and Roll Hotel also has food, but the menu won't be substantial enough for my husband. Bonus question: This will be election night. Are any of these places likely to be packed on election night?
  11. Now that the Washington Post has done a full profile on Mr. Bruner-Yang and most media outlets have already broken this news, makes sense to start a thread here. This is yet another really ambitious concept for the area with $300K of the startup money crowdsourced, a chef from Lyon Hall and plans for it to include a full retail mix of apparel, a donut shop, specialty coffee and Range-like stations simulating Asian markets/hawkers with all day/all meal coverage . Great to see and wish it well. If it works, this is big time for DC. Really fantastic the amazing amount of food-related development activity for a city that's relatively small. From the Post here City Paper coverage here Eater's renderings of the space here
  12. Ten 01 is described as "the newest restaurant concept from the family behind Ben's Chili Bowl" on their twitter page. They posted on Facebook and twitter that Ten 01 is soft opening on Tues, Oct. 20, at 5 pm. They're located above the Ben's on H Street at 1001 H St, NE, DC.
  13. I was sure this had been talked about on this thread but apparently not. And if that's the case, the fault is mine, as I'm the person who spends the most time on here talking about taco options on or near the H Street corridor. This place opened up earlier this year in the former Grace Deli spot on the corner of 7th and H. Per Prince of Petworth, they've applied for licenses for both outdoor seating and to serve alcohol, both of which would be nice. In my opinion, right now these are the best tacos on H Street. The tortillas at Impala remain the best, but I much prefer the tacos, and really the rest of the offerings I've tried, at Fresca, although in fairness they are very different establishments (Impala is a full sit-down restaurant with a bar and patio while Fresca is a small, counter-service establishment with minimal seating). So far we've mostly stuck to tacos and tamales, and I need to work through the rest of the menu.
  14. Mythology is now (soft) open at 816 H Street NE. The concept has been in the works for years and comes from former Atlas Room GM (and Mark & Orlando's owner) Mark Medley with his business partner Todd Luongo. Mythology opened quietly last night. With little fanfare, Mythology lined up the talented Chef Joseph Harran (formerly of Woodward Table, Bistro Bis and Vidalia) to operate the kitchen. If you don't know Chef Harran (and I did not), note that our fearless leader DonRocks has described him here as "exceptionally talented" and a "Top 20 Chef in the city." Our preview meal confirmed Don's informed opinion and was quite delicious and well-executed. We particularly enjoyed the blue crab toast appetizer, the scallops and steak (w/bone marrow) entrées, and the playful "coffee and tea" dessert. The second floor lounge area and roof decks of the building and concept remain under construction, but Mythology is open for dinner now and likely to add brunch and the upstairs bar/lounge space in the coming months. Some aspects of the Mythology theme were not to our taste, but we will be back again for another very good meal soon. Mythology is an instant contender on H Street, IMHO -- Chef Harran in back and Mark in front is a very strong combination and elevates the competition for quality dining here in NE DC.
  15. I couldn't find a topic on this place. If it exists, my apologies. We went to Cusbah late last week, and were impressed. The food was very good, extremely flavorful (they were not afraid to use heat), and extremely affordable. My goat vindaloo was $11, while my wife's chicken tikka makhni was $9, and it was more than enough food for us. They had some decent drink specials as well (and some appalling sounding mixed drinks, which involved Goldschlager and Jagermeister mixed together). I wouldn't travel to go here, but it's definitely the best Indian food I've had on the Hill (which is, admittedly, a low bar).
  16. Tom Sietsema's first bite tomorrow is on the Atlas Room, which opened about a month ago on H Street. We've been a few times and love it -- it's definitely elevated the game on H Street. Not only is it the best place to dine on H Street, but IMHO it is a truly great neighborhood restaurant and as good a spot for a nice meal as most any spot on greater Capitol Hill. Has anyone else been yet?
  17. Joe Englert, the man behind such dive bars as The Big Hunt, Lucky Bar, Capitol Lounge, and Pour House, strikes again, this time expanding his empire to the H Street, NE Corridor. Viewed by some as the next gentification project around town, Englert is moving in fast and furious with at least 7 projects slated to open on H Street -- the Argonaut Tavern being the first. What can I say, it's a typical Englert dive bar! This time he has struck with a 1800's sea wharf saloon meets pirate rum bootlegger theme. Lots of nautical stuff, pressed tin roof, uneven floor boards, mismatched tables and chairs, a pool table, and flat screen TVs showing sports the modern touch. The beer list was a little small, I had a rather tasty unknown IPA, but unlike many Englert spots the food was actually rather tasty in dive bar way. Despite it being New Year's Day, we went with the fried calamari which was tender, with lots of black pepper in the batter and the Italian sausage sandwich was actually pretty darn good. The winner being the sweet potato fries. Joe's places are what they are, dive bars, but it's a winning formula for him, and I look forward to checking out his other joints on H street in the coming months. Argonaut Tavern
  18. The above comments stuck with me. I preferred drinks such as Manhattan's, Martini's, Negroni's (mentioned above), Boulevadiers, on the rocks rather than straight up. Once on the rocks it sort of negates the issue of shaken not stirred. But its admittedly been a long time. I scarcely drink. Somehow--somewhere age caught up with me. But I found the above discussion haunting and required a field test: On the rocks vs straight up in a martini/cocktail glass. I hit a reasonable bar, (where a grad of the bar school was behind the rail) and ordered some dinner and drinks. Two boulevadiers...(which once was par for the course--and now is probably 1.5 too many). One straight up, one on the rocks. By the way, the bartender "free poured" using a count method. While I don't pour professionally and often any more I'll get new students started with learning a count method, get behind the bar, demonstrate, and usually I'm on target. (frankly if I was doing this "professionally" / for fun and money I'd test my rhythm and count every day behind a bar. Certain bars require that on every shift--good policy.) She wasn't eyeballing as she was pouring into a metal mixer, not a mixing glass. But if your pour and rhythm is on, you should hit accurate pours virtually all the time. Anyway the question for me was on the rocks or straight up in a cocktail glass. The first was straight up. The cocktail glass was chilled for an adequate time, lot of ice in the mixing tin...and a longish shake. That conveys a lot of chill. Nice. But....I think the best part of the chill lasted about 1/2 an hour. I don't recall the room being overly warm. Its simply that the chill "leaves". I had her pour the drink into a rocks glass with ice and the chill returned. Yes, as I got to the last bit of drink it was diluted. The second cocktail was on the rocks from the beginning. The chill stayed far longer. I enjoyed it more. No I didn't finish it, but toward the end it was diluted somewhat and I could discern that. Still enjoyed it far more. Now that ended up being a tough test for me. About 1.5 cocktails too many at my stage. As to measuring vs eyeballing or free pouring. Well I hope or doubt most bartenders Don't Eyeball. I hope, when they are free pouring they are using a count method...but I know if you don't practice and stay on top of one's rhythm it goes astray. For some cocktails it shouldn't matter much...for others it makes a big difference. From an owner perspective, there are just under 34 ounces in a 1 liter bottle. Over pour all the time...there go your margins. Pour erratically, drinks come out tasting differently. I'd simply suggest measure or free pour...but if free pouring be damned good with your count rhythm. Its not difficult.
  19. So, we've gone from zero to two "Fast-Casual Asian Bowl Places" on H Street over the past month or so. Last night I picked up carry-out from the brand new Pow Pow, which just opened this past Saturday. They don't seem to have a menu available online, so I can't remember the names of everything we ordered. This is refreshingly not a Chipotle-like concept, and instead has you just pick actual items off of a relatively small menu. They have bowls, with stuff served over rice, as well as gigantic, burrito sized fried egg rolls. We didn't go with one of the egg rolls, and instead got two bowls, Fugazi Osbourne (beef with hoisin sauce and a bunch of stuff) and something I can't remember the name of that had pork and a poached egg. Everything was solid, although I wasn't a huge fan of the coconut rice, in both flavor and texture. Between this and BAB Korean Fusion, I think I prefer BAB. But both are good, and I'm happy this is here.
  20. I've been meaning to start a thread on this for a while, but then Tim Carman's review today spurred me into action. I have been convinced for the past few years that this spot, directly on the SW corner of 14th and H, right next to Tony's Breakfast, would never open. There would be construction, and then it would stop for months. They'd appear suddenly close to opening, and then there'd be no action. The sign itself was actually up for I think at least a year before they finally opened earlier this year. I've only been there once, so Tim's review is much more comprehensive, but we enjoyed it. We much preferred the bulgogi over the spicy chicken, and by far preferred the house veggies to the backyard veggies. It's affordable, it's something different for H Street, and it's finally open, so I'm happy.
  21. From Frozen Tropics: Soft Opening tonight from 5pm-10pm Send reservation requests to: info@ethiopicrestaurant.com http://www.ethiopicrestaurant.com/ Very excited for this new Ethiopian place.
  22. Friends and I were a bit trigger happy in our attempt to visit the not-yet-opened Toki Underground last night. But in lieu of ramen, we were able to try out chef Erik Bruner-Yang's popup taco stand "Tacos Impala" at the Philadelphia Water Ice space on H Street between 12th and 13th NE. Look for the wooden handpainted sign that reads "TACOS Impala". The menu consists of 3 types of tacos: carne asada, carnitas, and vegetarian (refried beans) all served in white-corn tortillas that are made from scratch and pressed to order. They are hands down the best tortillas in the area--fresh, soft, and so deliciously flavorful! They'd be good even with mediocre fillings, but fortunately all the fillings are very tasty and well-seasoned. The steak was surprisingly super tender, but my favorite was definitely the carnitas. They were a perfect blend of crisp pork and luscious fat, and the spicy green tomatillo salsa was the perfect compliment. Gosh, I could happily die drowning in that delicious green tomatillo sauce. At $3 a taco, I actually think Tacos Impala is a bargain dinner, but I've heard others balk at the pricing. Honestly, I feel that the quality of the ingredients more than warrants the cost and wait-time. And you can cut down the wait-time by calling ahead your order: (202) 375-0537.
  23. Jessica Sidman tweeted that DC Harvest is opening on Sept. 2. It's at 517 H St, NE, DC. More info about the restaurant is here.
  24. On what seemed like the hottest day of summer so far, we took a field trip to eat some fried fish. If it weren't so hot, I think I would've enjoyed it more as a quintessential DC experience. Horace and Dickies, 800 12th Street NE, serves up their fish fresh, right out of the fryer, pipin' hot. They're known for their deep fried croaker but we opted for their 6-piece whiting filets, some potato salad and mac and cheese for about $10. The fish is coated with a corn-meal based batter, and the pieces are huge! 6 pieces could feed 2-3 adults. Two small plastic containers of hot sauce, tartar sauce and 2 slices of white Wonder Bread come with the fish. The sides cost extra. Someone else had the croaker and said it was fishier (and bonier). The collard greens are good, the potato salad is mustardy and on the sweet side, the mac and cheese is not creamy, more lumpy (but still delicious IMO). The menu also has fish sandwiches (literally several pieces of fried fish sandwiched between white bread), crabcakes, shrimp, chicken and seafood platters. The hot sauce tastes like Frank's and extra containers of sauces can be had for eleven cents. In the refrigerator case, there were mini pies wrapped in plastic that were labeled "bean custard pie". The place is takeout only, no ambiance to speak of. It's just some deep fryers, a counter to order, and some refrigerator cases for drinks and sides. They have an old Zagat's Guide write-up on the wall that actually says, "in a sketchy neighborhood, so exercise caution." I didn't see any reasons for caution, except for the quantity of food you get for the price. whatta deal. Gotta love a place where I asked, "What's good here?" and the lady at the counter says without missing a beat, "Everything's good here, baby! It's all good."
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