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Found 140 results

  1. Kukuri received a moderate amount of hype when it opened, based on the presence of sushi chef Shimao Ishikawa. Ishikawa was behind the (sushi) bar at Michelin-starred Jewel Bako in New York, where I had a memorable meal years ago. I had omakase reservations last week ($175 per person), but ultimately cancelled after hearing rumors that Ishikawa was no longer in the kitchen. I asked a couple of the food critics in town, neither of which had heard anything. A perusal of the Kukuri Facebook page showed that Ishikawa responded to a negative review from his personal account, claiming to have been out of the kitchen since an automobile accident in November. I sent him (or at least whoever is behind the "Shimao Ishikawa" Facebook account) a personal message, and he confirmed that he is no longer associated with Kukuri. While their website still lists him, their frequently updated Facebook page now lists Masayuki Kawai as the head chef. I haven't been able to find out any information on his past work.
  2. Anyone know anything about this chain of sushi joints? Its about to open in Lancaster, Pa. I need intel. Help! Hungry, kat
  3. I ate here tonight based on Tim Carman's enthusiastic review and was very disappointed (Carman, you've misled for me for the last time...). The Akira Ramen (tonkatsu broth, with a couple thin slices of chasu, veggies, fish cake, and half an egg) was deeply mediocre. The broth, thin and bland, had little discernible pork flavor and mainly served as a carrier for the bitter char of the chasu. The curly noodles were little to write home about (or wax poetic about in the Post). Overall, a nothing bowl of ramen. I ordered the grilled yellowtail collar as an appetizer, was told it'd take 15 to 20 minutes, so asked for it to come out before the ramen. After about 25 minutes, the ramen came out first, and the yellowtail a few minutes later. The fish was moist and nicely grilled, but it won't bring me back on its own. Sitting at the bar, you could see bowls of ramen being plated sluggishly by an inexperienced kitchen staff -- nothing like the well-oiled machine at Daikaya.
  4. There's a ramen shop called Ramen Factory 42 in Falls Church that's opening soon, in the mini-strip with Takumi in the former Smashburger location.
  5. Signage just went up for Takohachi, a Japanese Restaurant opening in the place of the rowdy Sports House Grill on the Northeast corner of South Glebe Road and Columbia Pike in South Arlington's Westmont Shopping Center:
  6. A friend has been urging me to watch "The Crying Game" recently, and unfortunately, I kind-of, sort-of found out why before deciding to watch it, but not quite - anyway, I think that a great film should be able to still be a great film even though its Big Reveal is lost. There are advantages to knowing it in advance, because you can take note of the director's brilliance in trying to gently hint at it throughout. Forest Whitaker has always seemed the unlikeliest of stars to me - a dark-skinned, overweight Texan with a physical quirk - but I've always loved him in his roles, for example, "the guy who hustled 'The Hustler.'" Here, he plays Jody, a British soldier in Northern Ireland; his nemesis, a Provisional IRA volunteer named Fergus, played by Stephen Rea (Academy Award Nominee for Best Actor). Both actors are introduced to the viewer virtually immediately. *** SPOILERS FOLLOW *** DO NOT READ PAST THIS POINT UNTIL YOU "KNOW" Alright, there are two ways to watch "The Crying Game" - knowing in advance about Dil (Jaye Davidson, Academy Award Nominee for Best Supporting Actor), and not knowing in advance about Dil. I'd just found out about her a couple of weeks ago, but decided to watch the film anyway - great works of art do not depend on a single reveal. In many ways, I'm glad I knew in advance, because I could see just how much went into concealing things, but also because I got to enjoy the film as an art film, without having to look back and wonder if I would have "really" liked it had I known. This is an excellent movie, and I think in many ways I like it more having "known" about Dil in advance. PS - As much as I love "Unforgiven," Jaye Davidson deserved the award for Best Supporting Actor over Gene Hackman.
  7. Kanji-Kana is a very sweet and welcoming place on the 3rd floor of 1018 Vermont Ave. NW. I went today for the first time because I had to be downtown all day for boring seminar, ugh. This review by Tim Carman gives a good explanation of what is wonderful and what is acceptable about it. I will not say that the ramen was particularly great, but the experience was in fact great: a quiet, sweet, and welcoming place with a warm bowl of noodles. Their website is a weird little thing powered by GrubHub for some reason. All I'm saying is that on a day when you are downtown and want a quick respite with some very decent food and a lovely vibe, check it out.
  8. Sunday night we went with my SIL to Rolls n Rice. She likes getting sushi here because you can get soy wrappers and she isn't a seaweed fan. The sushi isn't in competition for best of the DMV, but it is affordable and they have a nice selection of bento, normal sushi (very close to like quick made conveyor sushi in Tokyo, I am sure they use a machine to make the nigiri rice and they do it for speed, not for quality of the sushi), noodles, soup, etc. It is a fast causal order at the counter place. We have been before and the people who work there are very nice. They are really fast at making sushi. Once you order you get a number, they bring you salad, some dishes also get miso soup. I got a combo bento box with 3 pieces of nigiri, 4 pcs California roll, beef bulgogi, rice, 2 tempura shrimp and some tempura vegetables. It was really too much food, but I managed to eat it all. I should have saved the sushi for lunch today, as Matt overate his sushi and said we should have packed up a few pieces. The tempura was just as expected. The bulgogi was saucy, but good. This is definitely like fast-casual Japanese food, but it's affordable and a nice quick stop for dinner. We like going here, we think it's fun and we can swap things from each person's order to try.
  9. Having had an exceptional experience in Hong Kong with a Yakitori place there (which I still need to write up and post about), we looked for someplace in the DC metro area and came up empty. We tried a place on our recent trip to NYC called Yakitori Tora. It wasn't as good as the place in Hong Kong, but it was still very good! Yakitori is, I think, most often char-grilled skewers of meats, mainly chicken. The place in Hong Kong, aside from cheese (yes cheese), it was pure chicken. This place had more than that. We had chicken in many forms, thigh, heart, skin (a very, very inventive rendition and tremendous), and liver of course. Oh and duck meatball. And bacon wrapped mushrooms. Fun and good. It's a meal you can make as long or as short as you like and since each thing you order is pretty small, you can dig in for the long haul or just stop in for a snack before you go somewhere else. I'd go here again. Photos
  10. Let me start by saying I've never been to Japan, and I've never been to Masa. That said, for my personal preference, Japan is second only to France for my favorite cuisine, and I am very much of a sushi and sashimi hound - it's just about my favorite thing (along with foie gras, caviar, etc.) I had, without much doubt, the best Sashimi-Sushi Omakase I've ever eaten on Wednesday night at the Sushi Bar at Sushi Ogawa, and I've been to most of the great sushi specialists in the U.S. and Vancouver. The only option is a $100 omakase, and I highly advise all diners to call and see if Chef Ogawa will be working before they commit to this meal. My friend made the reservation under her name, and I have no reason to think I was recognized, but boy, this sure seemed like more than the "12-14 courses" they advertise. I don't rule out the possibility that I was spotted, but regardless, I'm spotted at most other top Japanese restaurants in DC, and nobody has put out sashimi and sushi like this before, not even the great Sushi Taro. I had made an exception to my own unwritten rule (the only other one-visit Bold I've ever made has been Elements in Princeton, NJ), and initialized Sushi Bar at Sushi Ogawa as such (this was absolutely the best meal I've had in 2017, my dining partner said it was by far the best sashimi-sushi she's ever eaten, and I've spent nearly 8 weeks this year in Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles), but just to be prudent, I'm going to wait for other people to chime in. There are numerous Michelin 3-star sushi restaurants in Japan, but I honestly cannot envision any sashimi-sushi-driven meals being much better than this, even though I'm sure they are. Still, this raised the bar for me, personally, by a fair amount. About the only thing that fell short of excellence was the crème brûlée (it was fine, but Koji Terano can rest easy). If you go with another person, treat yourselves to a .720ml bottle of Eikun "Big Hawk" Junmai Ginjo sake ($65 on their list, and it will carry you through the entire meal).
  11. We had Japanese brunch on Saturday at Okane (669 Townsend at 18th in South of Market), a sister restaurant of Omakase. House salad, rice cracker, ume vinaigrette. Miso soup. Tsukemono. You can really tell how good a restaurant is by whether the kitchen pays attention to detail, and these were no exception. Pictured are kyuri-zuke (pickled Japanese cucumber) and asa-zuke (zucchini, carrot and onion quick pickle). Oysters with tobiko (flying fish roe) and scallion. Clockwise from bottom center: stewed pork belly, green onion; sesame tofu with cucumber and wasabi; soy-glazed smoked salmon; broth with daikon radish, hon-shimeji mushrooms, chicken and watercress; tamago-zushi (egg omelette cooked with mirin and dashi, wrapped around Japanese rice with nori seaweed). This was served with a bowl of Japanese rice. The salmon was a tad overcooked, but otherwise everything else was spot on. We were comped a plate of tuna and salmon sashimi that the kitchen sent out because the oysters took about 15 minutes to get to our table. A very nice gesture on their part. Really great value for the price. Total bill was $67 for 2 people not including a 20% tip.
  12. House salad with soy and ume vinaigrette. I'm so glad it's something other than the ubiquitous carrot-ginger dressing that seems to be universally shared at other Japanese restaurants elsewhere in this country. Japanese-style fried chicken, served with lemon and hot mustard. Greaseless and expertly fried, but you can get better elsewhere in San Francisco. Chicken ramen with paitan broth, chicken chashu, soft-boiled egg, negi, kikurage mushrooms and bean sprouts. In a word: awesome. Hakata tonkotsu (Hakata-style ramen with rich pork broth, simmered pork belly, soft-boiled egg, negi, kikurage mushrooms and bean sprouts). Marufuku 1581 Webster Street (Geary Blvd.) Japantown
  13. I didn't see a thread about this new addition to Clarendon so thought I'd start one (feel free to modify or move if I'm incorrect). My wife and I went a few nights ago with high hopes but were disappointed. We live in the area and love ramen, but I doubt we'll be back to Hanabi. We ordered the tonkatsu and the miso ramen. The tonkatsu broth was just one note, none of the depth of flavor I'm used too. Similarly, the miso tasted like the same broth but with an overwhelming amount of chili oil. Different noodles were served with each bowl, but the flavor and texture were off on both. The tonkatsu noodles especially were too overcooked, and too thin. Fix-ins were fine, but nothing outstanding. Sadly, our bowls hardly compared to the standout places in DC, let alone what we remember from Tokyo. Perhaps we caught them on an off night, but next time we're feeling ramen we'll head into the city.
  14. I have not been able to find any DC-area Yakitori restaurants. There are certainly some in NYC. Am I overlooking and just missing it if there is one around here?
  15. We've been going to Rintaro for a while now and are considered regulars. They've been serving lunch for several months. B and I had put that on our list but for some reason, plans kept going awry....that is, until today. Japanese fried chicken wings with smokey tare, sansho pepper and wasabi arugula. There is some really stellar, excellent frying in the kitchen. The chicken was marinated and coated in a crispy, flavorful shell that literally melted in our mouths. Berkshire pork gyoza, chicken foot jelly. The "lace" shows you how light the batter is. Hand-rolled udon, with two fishes broth, tenkasu (deep-fried flour batter) and hot spring egg. The covered pot contains togarashi pepper and gomashio (sesame salt). Kaisen mori-don. Clockwise from center: chopped California big eye tuna, wild striped bass and kombu-cured halibut over Japanese rice with nori, tamago (egg omelette) and shiso; soy sauce; wasabi leaf pickle, narazuke (traditional pickles from the Nara region of Japan) and senmaizuke (a traditional pickle originally from Kyoto, made from turnips); carrot and daikon radish pickle; Tokyo turnips and scallions in mustard-miso; marinated cucumbers in rice vinegar with black cod; miso soup with shimeji and maitake mushrooms. Total bill came out to $95 (with 20% tax and tip). Rintaro82 14th Street (Folsom Street)South of Market http://izakayarintaro.com/ Medium article from April 2015 SF Chronicle reviews (for those of you who like Michael Bauer; personally I detest him, but variety is what makes the world go round): Original Review and Follow-Up Review from Last Year
  16. After a couple "meh" experiences at other sushi spots around town, I have seen the truth, and it is Hori-san's sushi rice. I absolutely cannot bring myself to get excited about eating sushi anywhere else. Yes, yes, the fish is superb, impeccably prepared, and seasoned such that your soy sauce and freshly grated wasabi stare on longingly as you neglect them throughout the meal. But that rice. So perfectly seasoned, juuuuust sweet enough, and never overpacked or structurally unsound. I honestly think you do yourself a disservice by ordering sashimi at Kata. As far as I can tell, the play is to get an appetizer or two (chicken skewers 3 ways, miso eggplant, and the ceviche wouldn't be a bad way to go), and then ask for an omakase sushi from the chef with as few or many pieces as you feel like. We've done this both from the sushi bar and the tables.
  17. "The Trump International Hotel's Next Restaurant Will Be Sushi Nakazawa" by Becky Krystal on washingtonpost.com If only this were not in the Trump hotel. They are trying to distance themselves from Trump though.
  18. Uramaki

    It's very easy to get "uramaki" into your memory, and keep it there. This post will be somewhat puerile, with shameless anthropomorphism, but its ultimate goal is for you to remember the word uramaki, so bear with me: Most people (most people here, anyway) know that Sushi comes in several basic types. Three of these types are, by far, the most common, at least here in the states: 1) Sashimi - Sashimi is actually not sushi, since sushi by definition implies the existence of rice. Sashimi is just the fish, has no rice, and is therefore not sushi - if you know this distinction, you already know more than most Americans (seriously, you do). 2) Nigiri Sushi - Nigiri Sushi is what most people think of when they think of sushi - the hand-formed "pieces" that you always see, with the fish on top of the rice. 3) Maki Sushi - Maki Sushi are rolls, not individual pieces - the roll is formed, then cut into individual cylinders (usually six). Why did I present these three terms, in this order? Because if you're "going out for sushi," i.e., not getting food cooked in the kitchen, and want to do it in a typically Japanese fashion, you'll order your meal in this exact order: sashimi first, followed by nigirizushi (*), followed by makizushi. Course it out this way, in three separate courses. Obviously, there are no "rules," and you can do whatever you wish (even the most hardened sushi chefs will tell you to do whatever pleases you), but this is a very "Japanese" way of ordering sushi, and there is no need, or expectation, to place your entire order at once; enjoy your sashimi, then order whatever nigiri you like, then order your maki based on what you're still in the mood for. Ordering at three different points will often change what you order, as your hunger level and palate mood will change over the course of the meal. You may have noticed that Uramaki contains the suffix, "maki," and that's because it is a variant of maki. However, although it's made in essentially the same fashion (rolled with bamboo, then sliced into cylinders), what makes it uramaki is one, simple thing: the rice is on the outside. Most people who have enjoyed sushi have encountered uramaki many times, without necessarily knowing what it's called. Here is a platter of all four types of sushi we've defined, and you should be able to easily tell which is which: And here's another picture, this one an imaginary picture - imagine one day you're out for a walk, and you come across an "inside-out roll," lost, lonely, and scared, because it doesn't know what type of sushi it is. With a reassuring confidence, you look right at it, and say in a calm, soothing voice, "You are a maki." (*) For those wishing to dig a bit deeper. If I ask the sushi chef for "one little thing" after my maki course, I'm often given a Temaki - sort of like having an ice-cream cone for dessert ... happy hunting.
  19. After months of trying, and attempting to recommend "Cold Fever" to people, I finally found it for rent online. It's not the easiest thing in the world to do, but it seems safe enough - it will take a leap of faith, however. Believe me, I've tried *everything*, and finally found something that worked, with one caveat. Go to icelandiccinemaonline.com, sign up for an account, and then comes the leap of faith: You need to purchase credits to watch films, in increments of 5 Euros. Renting "Cold Fever" requires 3 Euros of credits, and as of this writing, I have 2 Euros in my account - they're just sitting there, and probably won't be used, so I'll be happy to give them to anyone wanting to watch the film. The catch is that 2 credits aren't enough; you need 3, and so you'll need to purchase 5 more regardless. However, if you do purchase 5 more, I'll give you my 2, and you'll have a total of 7, which will give you enough to watch two films (assuming the second one is no more than 4 credits). I'll also need to figure out a way to either transfer my credits to your account, or give you access to my account, so just write me, and we'll figure this out together. Okay, now for the caveat: This is mostly an English-language film - the Icelandic parts are almost non-existent, but the very beginning is in Japanese, and when I saw this in the movie theater, 20+ years ago, I'm pretty sure the Japanese part was sub-titled into English; this version has no subtitles at all, so I'll need to tell you what they're talking about in the first 10-15 minutes of the film. Once I do, it will be extremely easy to follow: *** SPOILERS FOLLOW *** Hirata is a wealthy young Japanese businessman, played by Masatoshi Nagase with *hilarious* subtlety. His parents traveled to Iceland for a vacation, where they perished, and if I recall correctly, the anniversary of their death is coming up (it might be the one-year anniversary, or 5 year, but he's a young man, so it couldn't have been too long ago). It is customary to honor your parents by traveling to the place where they died, and performing a ritual at that location, which is what sends Hirata to Iceland in the dead of winter. That is the point where, about 15 minutes into the film, you see him boarding an SAS flight to Iceland, and that's the point where you no longer need sub-titles. *** SPOILERS END HERE *** I really didn't spoil much in the previous section, so it won't kill you to read it, and in fact, you'll *need* to read it unless you understand Japanese, because I'm telling you what happens in the non-sub-titled portion of the film - it won't ruin anything, and you'll need to know the set-up to enjoy the film. The rest of the movie is the "road film" portion, and it alternates between laugh-out-loud funny and darkly, strangely funny. I really recommend this film, not as a masterpiece, but as a 90-minute little gem - a "small film - that will be 90 minutes very well-spent. And, as I said above, I'll be happy to give you my 2 credits - get in touch. If you don't want mine, I might take yours - either way, the extra credits shouldn't go to waste.
  20. Just wanted to bump this thread and let people know that Himitsu had its official opening last night. I was lucky enough to attend a preview dinner on Wednesday; raw fish preps and the entire beverage program are absolutely going to be highlights. Not really fair to "review" or critique, as they weren't even really open yet, but multiple plates are priced substantially lower than they should be. Happy to post photos of the menus and / or food if helpful. A super talented young duo, and one that should do quite well in the space. Cheers!
  21. I saw a post on Matsu Sushi in the Chantilly thread, but I couldn't find a topic, so I started one. Website Hours: LUNCH Mon-Fri 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM Sat 11:30 AM - 3:00 PM DINNER Mon-Thurs 5:00 PM - 10:00 PM Fri-Sat 5:00 PM - 10:30 PM Sun 5:00 PM - 9:30 PM I went there for lunch with my brother today as it was close to his office and I haven't had sushi in a while. For lunch it was extremely efficient and you can definitely get in and out on a reasonable lunch time schedule. We both got sushi with miso soup and salad. Their salad dressing was fine, but not my favorite. Their miso soup was a bit too cloudy, but again was fine. The sushi was very uniform and neat. The rice was nicely prepared and I thought they did a very good job with the rice. I thought everything was very fresh and they had a nice selection. It wouldn't be my top sushi choice in all the sushi places I can go to, but I was really impressed at the service, how fast and efficient it was and how fresh everything was for a shopping center in Centreville. THAT would make me go back.
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