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Found 89 results

  1. I first tried out Seoul Food's offerings at the DC Grey Market a few months back. They're now a full-blown food truck and received a nice writeup in yesterday's Good to Go column. They make their way to Courthouse once every week or two, and Rosslyn, Clarendon, and Ballston are among their regular stops. So far I've tried a couple of different dishes and find that they are tasty, filling, and a pretty good value. As the article notes, the bibimbap is a little different than the usual restaurant version, with shredded fresh carrots and radishes and salad greens included. The beef and the tofu version are both good, especially with the spicy chili sauce on top mingling with the runny egg yolk. The Superbowl tends more Latin, but is also loaded with good flavors and fresh ingredients.
  2. Cafe Kimchi has closed. The space is now open under (I believe) different ownership with a new name and prettier look. The new restaurant is Torai, which serves Korean and Japanese food. Yelp link (obligatory "Sorry, Don.") Someone I know who lives nearby told me about the change and said that the food is quite good and a step up from Cafe Kimchi. I have not been in to eat here yet and, for that matter, only got food at Cafe Kimchi once. I forget what it was but it wasn't something that traveled too well. Given the small space, takeout probably remains the best option here, though there is some seating. The space is at 751 8th Street, SE, next to District Doughnuts.
  3. Just thought I'd start this thread since people were asking about it in the WLO thread. My parents got some take-out when it first opened and said it was pretty good. We tried going there a couple of weeks back and the wait was over an hour. Definitely liked the vibe when we first walked in and it reminded of being in Seoul. Anyhow, did some research and was able to find a website although it's mostly in Korean but the menu is translated to English with prices. After looking at the pics and menu, I think I'll have to stop by again soon and this time wait until I'm seated. Anyone been yet care to give us a review? http://kt411.com/adf/detail.asp?Blobid=81
  4. This restaurant is new, & getting pretty good reviews-would anyone be interested in meeting for lunch or dinner there sometime in the next few weeks? I don't eat a lot of Korean BBQ, but they're running an AYCE special w/ fatty brisket (chadol bakgi), 3 layered pork belly (sam kyup sal), spicy pork belly (jang sam gyup sal), miso pork, & spicy chicken (dak galbi), & 'the works'-steamed egg, soup, sides, & rice, noodles, or rice cakes for $18.99 (Or $27.99 w/ that, plus intestines). I'd also like to try some of the soups, cold noodles, & haemul jun. --- dr.com Dinner at Kogiya, Thursday, May 16th at 5:30 PM here
  5. Now you've done it, you've started a mee-guk stampede to Nakwon.
  6. It's a rather open looking yellow cart. I'm not sure how it's going to handle the winter weather. There are two food options - bulgogi and chicken teriyaki. Both are made on the spot in woks. All choices come on rice with a side of iceberg lettuce with a soy sauce-based dressing and kimchee. You can also ask for sriracha if you want. The bulgogi was decent - not anything spectacular, but compared to a lot of what I've had within DC pretty good and a good deal at $6.75. The kimchee wasn't too fermented, so the cabbage was still light and crisp. I'm not sure if that will change the longer they're in business. They have some sundries - chips, Doritos, sodas and Gatorade. I wish they would have more Korean-type sundries, but at the same time I don't know how successful that would be for the area. But for a first foray into ethnic food cart, I'm pretty satisfied. It will certainly satisfy the Korean BBQ jones when I don't feel like driving out of the city.
  7. I read the NY Times article that I'll link below a couple of months ago and was curious to see how Bon Chon chicken tasted like and to my surprise a Bon Chicken store opened up inside the new Lotte Plaza Int'l supermarket in Germantown. I looked around their website and it looks a new one is also opening up in Annandale [this link has the new location] on 7/15. Anyhow, if you happened to be up in Germantown, I highly recommend you try this korean-style fried chicken. It has a very light flaky skin and juicy meat that tastes wonderful. They have two flavors, soy garlic and a spicy variation. Both my wife and I were partially to the spicy one. The pieces of chicken are available in drumsticks or wings and come with a radish side dish that some korean restaurants serve as a pan-chan. Feb 7, 2007 - "Koreans Share Their Secret for Chicken with a Crunch" by Julia Moskin on nytimes.com
  8. Marja Vongerichten enters the quick serve market. Opening soon: "Marja Vongerichten Launches BiBiFresh, a Roving Bibimbap-up" by Hugh Merwin on newyork.grubstreet.com
  9. Lady KN and I were at Honey Pig Izakaya tonight -- we didn't see it specifically mentioned in the Honey Pig Multiple Locations thread, but if that's where it belongs, then please move it there...!) We were sort of aiming for Honey Pig, but ended up at Honey Pig Izakaya instead. We're glad we did -- less boisterous, lower music, no barbecue residue all over us. Owned by the same people as Honey Pig, they gladly took our Living Social coupon. We ordered around the menu and had way too much food, and just the right amount of beer, for what would have been $90 all in, four beers, tax and tip included. Seafood Pancake - Not as large as the one at To Sok Jip, and a bit on the greasy side, but quite good. We had two small wedges left over at the end and I picked through one of them to find about 75% octopus (or squid), and some flecks of white fish flake and shrimp pieces. Of course, lots of scallions too, with the green parts left in long slices and the white parts in very small disks. I would order this again. Grilled Whole Squid - A beautiful dish, about 8-9 inches long, 3 inches wide, perfectly browned and sliced in quarter-inch rings. Despite its appearance, the dish was otherwise a dud. It was quite chewy and had very little flavor. I would not order this again. Spicy Seafood and Tofu Stir Fry - Not too spicy, so I'm assuming they dumbed it down for us meeguks (learned that from Escoffier). The tofu was quite soft, and disintegrated as we picked through the dish. It had lots of octopus, which gave it a chewy mouthfeel, and some tender mussels (not enough for Lady KN's liking), shrimp and squid. I might order this dish again, only spicier. Sushi Special -- Deal of the night at 10 pieces of nigiri (or whatever the Korean word is) for $12.99. Eel, tuna, salmon, white fish, yellow tail, more or less. I would order this again. We perused the izakaya menu and promised to graze it on our next visit....
  10. Must give a shout-out to one of my favorite sandwich shops around. Generously-sized hand-carved sandwiches on fresh bread at very reasonable prices. Sounds very simple, but I'm always surprised about how few places successfully implement this concept. This is one of them. Last weekend: Roast Turkey sandwich piled with lots of veggies for $5.75 and my personal version of the Turkey Melt (hand-carved turkey, bacon, lettuce, tomato, avocado, sprouts, swiss cheese and honey mustard on a wheat sub roll) for $6.75. One of the best values around, IMHO.
  11. I've only been to this Korean restaurant twice. It is in a small strip mall on Rhode Island Ave just a few blocks north of the intersection with Rt. 1 in Beltsville. Seoulia seems to specialize in soups and casseroles. There are some tables that have inset grills for bbq, but most of the other diners seem to chose dishes that involve tabletop burners with bubbling pots of stew/soup/casserole. On the first visit, I had the soondubu jjigae (soft tofu stew), which was spicy and pretty flavorful. On the second trip, we had both the seafood and kimchi pancakes and also some bulgogi. The bulgogi was pretty standard, but the pancakes were both quite good, containing various forms of squid, shrimp, and such. I definitely intend to come back and try some of the casserole/stew dishes that seem most popular with the Korean clientele.
  12. Hmmm . . . everything I've ever read about Yamazoto emphasizes that it's a place specializing in, well, humongous "specialty" rolls, which I've found to be a surefire sign that I won't like it. But if other Rockwellians would confirm its quality . . .
  13. Not wanting to cook on Friday night we gave this place a try for carry out. We got the A2 - Pan fried dumplings (Beef), A7 - Seafood Pancake, C8 Bulgagi and e8 Bibimap. Pretty much everyone enjoyed everything which is a feat when you have four kids. My 3 year old daughter loved the dumplings and declared them one of her favorite restaurants (Entering the pantheon of ABC Canteen). My favorite was the seafood pancake but really everything was strong. Since they are conveniently located halfway between my office and my house I can see them entering the carry out rotation.
  14. Mr P spotted a sign in the defunct barbershop near the Captain's Market. Googling led to this. That's all I know.
  15. I have been wanting to try this hole in the wall place. The only problem is that the menu is in Korean only, and I am not Korean. Anyone being to the place and can recommend a couple of dishes? Thanks
  16. I went here last night. Definitely hipster/upscale Korean. They specialize in customizable bowls of bibimbap. Also serve Ssam but my spicy pork belly was dried out and not fun to eat whike the dolsot (hot stone bowl) bibimbap was delicious. We also had korean fried wings, scallion pancakes (pajeon) and mandu. They also serve great soju cocktails and house infused soju. They also have this amazing desert with house fried potato chips, honey butterscotch sauce and ice cream. Located in silver spring on sligo ave
  17. Quick shout-out to Pop Tacos, which is probably my favorite lunch spot in Baltimore. It's basically a family-owned version of Chipotle run by a super nice Korean couple. You can get burritos, quesadillas, burrito bowls, or tacos with your choice of chicken, pork, steak, fish, or Korean-marinated pork. Onions and peppers are sauteed to order and guacamole can be added for no additional cost. I'm not sure if it's the marinade, salsa, or what, but I've always thought that Pop Tacos' food is everything Chipotle should be. You can also get some Korean specialties like bibimbap and great breakfast burritos as well.
  18. Last Friday I had lunch at Arisu, a charming, down-to-earth Korean restaurant located next to Bistrot Lepic in upper Georgetown. Apparently, Arisu has been in business for 10 months now. The menu has mostly Korean dishes, but also some Japanese ones as well (ramen, tempura, sushi; in fact, our waitress mentioned that they have plans to open a sushi bar in the downstairs space at some point.). Note that the main dining room is upstairs, there's nothing on the main level, and the bathrooms are in the basement. Let me preface this review by saying that I'm a virtual novice when it comes to Korean food although I've had Korean barbecue a number of times. At Arisu. I had the Ssam (thin strips of marinated ribeye beef topped with radish) as an appetizer and the mandu dumpling soup. The soup was delicious! (I remembered reading a post by Dean Gold about how well some Korean restaurants do soup, and I would venture to guess that Arisu is one of them.) The dumplings were made of chicken and veggies, and the broth was extremely flavorful with noodles, scallions, and mushrooms. The small soup was quite filling (I don't think I could have made it even halfway through the entree, larger size), and the price was really reasonable ($5.95). Our waitress said it is a healthy soup and takes more than three hours to prepare. My friend and I were also thinking of getting a tofu dish, but were unsure of which one to order. Next time I may try the spicy tofu soup. Service was very friendly and gracious. The atmosphere is comfortable and attractive, with simple wooden tables, banquette seating and comfy pillows. cushions lining the bench seating, and deep red walls. And as I said before, prices are reasonable (most lunch entrees are $9-$15 and appetizers average $6). Arisu would be good for a date or place to catch up with a friend (the ambiance is somewhat Zen; not completely quiet, but much quieter than other nearby lunch spots. I look forward to having another meal at Arisu soon. Im already craving its mandu soup! P.S. I dont think Arisu has a website. Heres the address & tel: 1734 Wisconsin Ave NW (between N R St & N S St) Washington, DC 20007 (202) 333-8822
  19. I have been meaning to try Gazebo Cafe in Kentlands for a while because it has pretty good local press. They don't have a website, but they have some sort of Facebook Page [unofficial].. Located a short walk from my house in the Kentlands, this is a little space with a bar and a few tables inside and outside (probably can't seat much more than 15 people, if that). Whenever we have tried to go, we couldn't get a table because it is so popular. Today we tried and hit it at the right time and nabbed a table. Gazebo is pretty much a coffee car with a breakfast/lunch/brunch menu. It is Korean owned and as a result they have a Korean menu also. All dishes looked very fresh and like they were prepared with care and love. Today I opted for the 2 eggs, with Korean beef with scallions and waffle brunch item with organic ginger/honey tea. I ordered the eggs over medium. They were served on a plate with the beef. I broke the yoke and mixed everything together. The flavors were very good. The waffle was also good, from a Belgian press. The tea came with a bunch of fresh ginger in the bottom. The tea was perfect for me as I have a cold, and the honey coated the throat. My wife and daughter each got half a waffle with ice cream (which holds a spot in my wife's heart from her days dining in Long Island diners). My 5 year old daughter had no idea what she was in for and sat wide eyed in disbelief at what she had ordered. Needless to say she finished every bit on her plate and asked for a spoon to try and get what remained of her cookies and cream ice cream. The waffle had a generous scoop of ice cream, with whipped cream, some drizzled chocolate syrup and couple of sliced strawberries. My wife was equally pleased. The service was very warm, kind of like you were dining at someone's home. We will definitely be back. Oh yes, it wasn't a typo, but they do also have dry cleaning, although I am pretty sure it isn't done on-site. I need to go back and have a pure Korean dish. I am sure it will be good.
  20. "Bulgogi Cultists, Rejoice: Jonathan Gold Finds First-Rate Korean Barbecue at Gwang Yang" by Jonathan Gold on latimes.com
  21. Ok, here's a place I've been curious about for a few months (but will admit, I haven't yet had a chance to try)--Arirang. The address/phone is: 1326 E. Gude Dr. Rockville, MD 301.279.0023 It's in the same strip mall as Baronessa (to link it to a restaurant for which there is only minimal love!). Somebody posted a rather cryptic rec for it in a somewhat unrelated thread on chowhound, and I've never seen much about it elsewhere. Anybody know anything? Maybe an RPLC lunch sometime?
  22. "At Hanjip in Culver City, Jonathan Gold Says, 'Get The Stuff You Don't Normally See At Other Korean Barbecue Joints'" by Jonathan Gold on latimes.com
  23. Siroo or Juk Story - whatever it goes by now - has the best shaved ice I've had in the US. I recently tried many of the top kakigori shops in Tokyo and Siroo's bingsu compares favorably. Granted, bingsu is a little different than kakigori. Highly recommended in any case. Next time, I may try the rice porridge.
  24. What is currently the "best" Korean BBQ? I have heard that Honey Pig is not what it once was? Thoughts?
  25. I heard about this place from menusarang.com which introduces Korean restaurants in the DC Metro area. According to the website, Chef Chen used to work at a Chinese restaurant near the city hall in Seoul, left and came to the U.S. and opened this place. The website also added his black bean noodle and Jjampong (spicy seafood noodle soup) is fantastic. Escoffier and I tried the black bean noodle, Jjampong and Szechuan spicy shrimp. The black bean sauce has a deeper and earthier taste than usual. I am wondering if it is homemade. Diced pork, chopped onion and julienned zucchini were stir-fried with the black bean sauce. The sauce was very well done. I could tell the chef is very skillful. The texture of the noodles was okay, not as remarkable as Da Rae Won's. I ordered Jjampong and asked them to make it spicier. It wasn't very spicy, however, it was very tasty. The Szechuan spicy shrimp was good. It also could have been spicier. One thing I was disappointed with was that he made the dish very saucier therefore, it lost crunchiness. Overall, I ilke this place a lot and I will visit this place again soon. 'House of No MSG' was written on top of the menu. After I tasted his foods, I can trust the statement.
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