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Found 13 results

  1. Sunday night we went with my SIL to Rolls n Rice. She likes getting sushi here because you can get soy wrappers and she isn't a seaweed fan. The sushi isn't in competition for best of the DMV, but it is affordable and they have a nice selection of bento, normal sushi (very close to like quick made conveyor sushi in Tokyo, I am sure they use a machine to make the nigiri rice and they do it for speed, not for quality of the sushi), noodles, soup, etc. It is a fast causal order at the counter place. We have been before and the people who work there are very nice. They are really fast at making sushi. Once you order you get a number, they bring you salad, some dishes also get miso soup. I got a combo bento box with 3 pieces of nigiri, 4 pcs California roll, beef bulgogi, rice, 2 tempura shrimp and some tempura vegetables. It was really too much food, but I managed to eat it all. I should have saved the sushi for lunch today, as Matt overate his sushi and said we should have packed up a few pieces. The tempura was just as expected. The bulgogi was saucy, but good. This is definitely like fast-casual Japanese food, but it's affordable and a nice quick stop for dinner. We like going here, we think it's fun and we can swap things from each person's order to try.
  2. We ended up here after the close of the Democratic Convention Thursday because we wanted a bunch of food and drinks, and there weren't that many spots still serving those things after 1 am. We were able to roll in here with 20+ people, order drinks (cocktails are $5, and they have the extensive faux-tiki drink menu that I love at older Chinese restaurants) and a ton of food. It's not the best Chinese food I've ever had, but it was quite solid, and I'd even rate the pork dumplings and fried chicken wings higher than that. And it may have saved our lives, so I'll add another star for that. Full food menu until 3 am.
  3. Samurai Noodle, on Durham in the Heights opened in 2015 as the 1st Houston location of a small Seattle, Washington chain of ramen joints. I stopped in for lunch yesterday, and was surprised to find a nearly full restaurant. Given the heat/humidity, a steaming bowl of tonkotsu didn't really grab me, but Samurai offers 3 tsukemen options: a cold fish-based broth (described as "sweet"), a "peppery" chicken broth, and a spicy version of the chicken. I went with the basic peppery chicken broth ("Tetsu-max"), with "firm" noodles (you can specify the chewiness of your noodles, from soft to extra-firm). The house-made noodles were indeed firm, and I would not recommend venturing below this level, if you aren't into mushy noodles. The broth was strong and salty, as it should be, augmented with shredded pork, bamboo, and bits of nori. Condiments on the table included pickled ginger and chili sauce if you cared to dress up your bowl further. The portion of noodles was reasonable for lunch, though I imagine if I were here for dinner, I might ask for an extra serving, or maybe order some gyoza or karaage to start. There were a couple families with small children, and they have high chairs available if you need that sort of thing.
  4. I know that this forum is taking on a bit of an air like "An Index to Jonathan Gold's Restaurant Reviews," but that's okay with me until we get more participants - I love Gold's reviews, and this one is no exception. It's worth reading start-to-finish, and will have you craving Mian's style of Zjajiangmian when you're finished. "Mian Restaurant Has Noodles Like No One Else in the San Gabriel Valley" by Jonathan Gold on latimes.com
  5. Looks to be in the very early stages of development, and they are still looking for a lease. They are have a competition for designing the restaurant logo. PoP with the news. "Chef Deth & Chef Seng are combining forces to launch Khao Poon, DC's first Lao Noodle House. They're going to kick off the effort with some pop-up events at different locations as they lead up to securing the new restaurant's permanent location. Khao Poon will offer a unique culinary experience featuring noodle dishes inspired by traditional Lao cuisine as well as that of the surrounding countries."
  6. Definitely hipster Asian joint (in the vein of Momofoku or Toki Underground). I had their steamed pork dumplings and pork bao. Their bao were just like Momfoku in that steamed bun with a taco type presentation vs traditional enclosed bao. Quality was decent. I'm definitely interested in going back and trying their house made noodles. http://www.nainaisnoodles.com/ 1200 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910 301-585-6678
  7. Hangari Noodle Company appears to be ready to bring house-made Korean noodles this weekend to Hanoori Town, the cluster of restaurants a few doors down from the H Mart in Catonsville. As I have been told, the owner/chef has been in the restaurant business for more than 20 years in LA, including a hot restaurant in Koreatown called Hangari Kalgooksoo. The new Hangari Noodle follows the concept of his current LA restaurant -- focusing on two types of noodles (kalgooksoo and mil myun) and serving them in a variety of broths and sauces. This sounds like a cool addition to the Rte 40 corridor -- noodles that are rolled, cut and boiled only after you order. I hear soft opening on Friday, then public opening as early as Saturday.
  8. Brian Freedman's review of Xi'an Sizzling Woks in philadelphiaweekly.com website (Note: the website says Xi'an Sizzling Woks is closed Mondays; the article implies otherwise).
  9. After reading in other threads how good this place is, the Mrs. and I decided to give it a go. It was so good that we were back 2 days later with my in-laws. Four items that are can't miss: 1) House Special Chicken, which is half a chicken, sliced up by a cleaver, and cooked in some kind of delicious soy and garlic sauce; 2) the pork buns, which were some of the best dumplings I've ever had, especially when combined with the restaurant's homemade signature sauce of ginger and scallion; 3) the homemade noodles, fried with chicken, which is what you see the guy making in the window of the restaurant; and 4) The rolls, in either egg or spring form, which were great. I don't know what makes an egg/spring roll great or better than others, yet for whatever reason, these were. We also had a few other items, but liked their counterparts (mentioned above) better: The vegetable and leek dumplings, which were good and fresh, but we both liked the pork buns better. The homemade noodles in soup with chicken, which alone was enough to feed two people, but on the bland side (get them fried instead). The beef with ginger and scallions, which was a good dish, but didn't do anything to distinguish itself form the other thousands of "beef with (blank)" dishes I've eaten in my lifetime. After only 2 visits, I'm ready to declare it the best Chinese food in the city.
  10. Just one lousy "L" away from immortality in the Suggestive Restaurant Names Hall Of Fame.