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  1. I was a bit surprised to see that there were no posts on this restaurant, as Fabio has historically been a figure that has sparked conversation on DR. My wife and I went last night to a mostly full restaurant that is styled very similarly to Fiola Mare, although this space is much larger than Fabio's place on the Georgetown waterfront. Our first observation is that there are a lot of people working on the floor at Del Mar. Including the 2 women working at the host stand, we interacted with 6 different people in our first 2 minutes after being seated. Some people find this style of service attentive; my wife and I feel smothered. My feeling is that if I haven't even opened my menu, any question other than the type of water that I would like is premature. Especially questions about wine from the sommelier before I have been given a wine list, but I digress. After the service staff dispersed, I delved into the menu, which was organized by rather short sections of 3-5 dishes by different types of raw and cold dishes, hot dishes/appetizers, mains, and plates to be shared. We kicked things off with 6 oysters from New Jersey that were described as "briny and succulent", which is right up my alley. Unfortunately, while the oysters were succulent, I would definitely not describe them as briny, as they were a bit flat and not woken up by the Escabeche Vinaigrette. Another sauce was also delivered with the oysters, described as an "aioli", which was interesting as I have never heard of anyone having a mayo-like dip with oysters. This sounded awful to me, but my curiosity was piqued, so I tried it to make sure I wasn't missing anything with one of my oysters, and it was just as poorly paired and bad as it sounds. I'm assuming the inclusion was a mistake, as I can't imagine anyone liking what I tried last night. Shame on me for not using my better judgment, I guess. From there we went to hot appetizers, where we chose the Sopa de Castana y Cangrejo and the Scallops, Sea Urchin, and Black Truffles. The soup was far and away the best dish of the night, exactly what we were looking for on a cold night. It felt vintage-Trabocchi, very rich and flavorful, extracting flavors from ingredients and appropriate spicing to deliver a rich, well-balanced dish. We wanted seconds. The scallops were also nice, well paired with the vibrant sea urchin, but this would have been a better warm weather dish as it was very cold and very light. For our main, we got the Arroz Negro de Calamares en su Tinta. I should note here that we have had paella and arroz negro many times on trips to Spain and at restaurants in the US. We have had a couple versions that we really liked, but we often feel underwhelmed by these types of dishes. Maybe we don't love paella (or Spanish food in general)? I'm not sure, but I figure that I would point this out before saying that we were massively disappointed in this dish. It came out and was plated well by our waiter into large portions along with a side of lemon and, yet again, aioli. I asked the waiter about the aioli, to see if there was a particular way to eat the arroz with it as I have never seen it presented this way. He said that it was how "everybody" ate the dish, which confused me because I have had paella in Mallorca and Barcelona and have never seen it come with any sort of mayo substance. Is this normal? Again, I took the bait and put a dab of it on the side of my plate, dipping a bit of calamari and black rice in to take a taste. No. I can't believe that "everybody" eats this dish this way, as it became gooey and added nothing to the flavor palate. I ignored it for the rest of the meal, but again I must not be getting it, because I found the arroz to be bland and rather uninteresting, even with a copious amount of lemon squirted on top. Also, the calamari was somehow grilled and very chewy on the outside, but slimy and wet on the inside, combining both ways that I don't like my calamari cooked into one bite somehow. We were starving, but both of us still left a lot on our plates, as this just did not work for us on so many levels. We were a bit disheartened after the arroz negro, so we decided to pass on dessert and get the bill. For 2 glasses of Cava Brut, a middle of the road bottle of Ribeiro ($65), and the food listed above, the bill came to $232 after tax. I had to look twice, as this was more money than we had spent on any meal since our last visit to Komi, and far from extravagant or particularly satisfying food. At this price point, I can't possibly see us coming back here, but again maybe we just don't like this style of cuisine or we could have ordered better (cold crudo on a 40 degree night, yes that's my bad). I'll be interested to see how this place does over the years, as it really is huge, very expensive, and in the hot new high-rent district of DC.
  2. Mola opened tonight, in the former Radius space on Mount Pleasant St (the same building as Purple Patch). I was lucky enough to be invited by owners Karlos Leopold and Erin Lingle to the soft opening last week. Good, adult-tasting cocktails and a nice, short list of Spanish wines. We didn't try the seafood dishes, but the veggie plates had a lot of depth of flavor, the sort of Mediterranean treatment that's more common in California restaurants. Below: fried goat cheese with honey and beet chips, and sherry-glazed artichokes with herb, egg, and pine nut sauce. Their website at http://www.moladc.com is still under construction. The initial menu is here (350523116-Mola-Menu.pdf)
  3. Some friends and I had a wonderful lunch at Joselita today, in the old Sona Creamery and Wine Bar spot around the corner from Eastern Market. The space is beautiful aesthetically, with a wall full of black and white family photographs in the main room, another covered with posters, a very long sleek bar, and cafe tables and chairs. It has a European feel, as though one had stepped off Capitol Hill and right across the ocean. As has been noted in reviews, the menu offers three sizes of portions: tapas size, half size, and full size. We ordered five tapas portions, two from the "cold" side of the menu and three from the "hot" selections. Our server helpfully pointed out that the hot portions tend to be a little larger than the cold ones of the same size category, which we found generally to be true. I tried all but the Jamon Iberico de Bellota “Capanegra” - $12/23/45; Jabugo hand cut black foot Iberian ham, country bread. My friends loved this. The "country bread" were very small croutons shaped like itty-bitty baguettes. My favorite dish was probably Almejas a la sarten - $10/19/39; Manila clams, garlic, oloroso sherry. This was a more generous portion than I expected for a tapas serving, filling a decent-sized bowl, and I was glad for every last one of them. The clam broth was exquisite soaked up with the chunks of wonderful soft and crusty rustic bread that was brought for the table. (I also ate quite a bit of the bread with the plate of excellent salt-, pepper-, and rosemary-accented olive oil that accompanied the bread basket.) We ordered two types of pork with very different flavor profiles. One was Solomillo de cerdo al whisky con papas fritas - $10/19/39 Iberian pork tenderloin, garlic, cumin, fries. This boasted a winning combination of flavors enhanced by a slightly boozy sauce. Once all was gone, I further cleaned the plate of the sauced bits of onion and garlic remaining. One friend said that the fries topping the plate tasted like french fries filled with mashed potatoes, which is a creative description that hits the mark. Speaking of mashed potatoes, the other pork tapas dish was Presa Iberica a la plancha - $16/31/na; Grilled Iberian pork shoulder, mashed potato. The mashed potatoes were a perfect grilled or griddled mashed potato cake. There was a flavor to this pork we couldn't pinpoint, almost like maybe a mildly sour flavor. The tenderloin had a more assertive peppery flavor to it, which I think I liked little more, but both cuts of pork were good. It seemed odd that shoulder was significantly more expensive than tenderloin for about the same amount of meat, but it reads from the menu that the shoulder might actually be Iberico and the tenderloin something else. Not sure and I didn't ask. The other cold tapas that one friend ordered and I had a bit of was Crudo de atún y aguacate con cebolletas y almendras - $9/17/33; Tuna carpaccio, avocado mousse, spring onions, almonds. This was perhaps the smallest portion of all. It was very clean-tasting and fresh, though the avocado mousse didn't seem to have much flavor. Perhaps it was meant to be a blank canvas against (well, below) the tuna. Service was just great. Our server was very attentive and went above and beyond while we fussed over splitting the check. We agreed that we would order any of the things we tried again. If I were ordering only one kind of pork, I think I would go with the tenderloin, but I would certainly eat the pork shoulder again. Joselito is a great addition to the Capitol Hill/Eastern Market dining scene. There's nothing else like it around there, and I hope they thrive.
  4. Pamplona soft opened yesterday (food is 20% off yesterday and today), and their official opening is tomorrow, Thurs, Jan. 12 (Washington City Paper).
  5. Unless there's a topic that specifically demands its own thread (and there may well be), this thread can be a catch-all for any questions about learning the Spanish language - either Spanish Spanish, Latin-American Spanish, or even Portuguese (although that language, of course, is different enough to be considered distinct). We also have a diverse-enough member base where similar threads could be started for any given language; I happen to be dabbling in Spanish at the moment. My question is about the pronunciation of Escobar, as in, "Season 2 of Narcos is now out on Netflix." The default accent in Spanish is generally the penultimate syllable - there are numerous exceptions, and this is obviously one of them. Why is there no "acento agudo" over the "E" in Escobar? Stated differently, given that there is no acento agudo, why isn't the second syllable accented? With verb infinitives ending in "ar," the final syllable is (usually?) accented, but I believe that with Escobar, the initial syllable gets the accent. If I'm wrong about this, then the entire question may be moot.
  6. Now open in former Black Finn space. "Tapa Bar Opens in Bethesda" by Aaron Kraut on bethesdamagazine.com
  7. After our daughter was born last month, some good friends very generously sent us a gift box from Zingerman's that contained, among other things, a package of tortas de aceite. Per Wikipedia: "The torta de aceite, is a light, crisp and flaky sweet biscuit in the shape of a torta. The main ingredients are wheat flour, olive oil, almonds, sugar, sesame seeds, anise seeds and anise flavor." The package recommended having them with coffee or tea, and they were addictively good. Light, not too sweet, and with the right amount of olive oil flavor and spice to give it character. We're jonesing for some more. They're a bit pricey at Zingerman's though ($25 for a package of 12). Anyone know if the specialiy or higher-end supermarkets in the area carry them?
  8. A branch of Philadelphia's Amada opened on April 25, 2016, at 250 Vesey St (via Zagat). Website.
  9. Do any Spanish speakers know why certain feminine nouns (e.g., "agua") take a masculine article in the singular case? The only thing I can think of (at least in this case) is for clarity of sound - for example, "el agua" sounds perfectly clear, whereas "la agua" is more difficult to understand. If this is the case, why not simply use an apostophe, e.g., "l'agua?" Is clarity of sound the reason? If so, there's a similar thing in French to avoid connecting two potentially confusing-sounding vowels. For example, <<Il y a>> (those brackets are the French equivalent of quotation marks) means "There is." However, if you make it a question, you insert a "-t-" to avoid a confusing-sounding phrase: in order to say, "Is there?" you say <<Y a-t-il?>> as opposed to the incorrect <<Y a il?>> which is more difficult for the ears to understand - the "-t-" adds nothing whatsoever except clarity of sound. Granted, this has nothing to do with gender, but it might serve a similar purpose.
  10. Any ideas where I might find Morcilla - Spanish blood sausage - in the DC area? So far I've struck out with Stachowski's and Wagshal's. thanks!
  11. I couldn't find a thread for La Malinche, the tapas restaurant on Colesville Road in downtown Silver Spring, and it's not in Don's dining guide "“ so, I will start one! The place calls itself "Spanish and Mexican" tapas, and while it is certainly not as polished or refined as someplace like Jaleo, it fills the need for a quality neighborhood spot like this "“ I can't think of any other small plates place in downtown Silver Spring off the top of my head. That may be why it has lasted for over three years in an area that sometimes turns over non-chain restaurants pretty quickly, but I do think it is an above-average choice, particularly in one area (that I'll get to momentarily). I'll try and be comprehensive, since I'm starting the thread and have eaten there several times. I returned the other night for dinner, and the food was very good, but as is often the case with small plates, is not necessarily a great value at that time. We wanted to keep it relatively small, so we only ordered four tapas between the two of us "“ the basic patatas bravas, tortilla, and then the scallop and salmon preparations. The basic dishes are tasty, but not standout, although I will say that they are pretty generous with the potatoes for a tapas place (bigger than dishes I've had elsewhere for around the same price point). The fish dishes were very good "“ the fish seemed very fresh and well-cooked, and the sauces (a corn salsa for the scallops and a tequila sauce) were flavorful but not overwhelming. They did not ask how we wanted either dish cooked, which is probably more relevant for the salmon. I'll note that value proposition may come into question for some here "“ the fish dishes were each $10, with three medium-sized scallops and a relatively small piece of salmon (on top of purple potatoes and Brussel sprouts) "“ and that is certainly the path to a high bill at a tapas spot. On previous trips, I've enjoyed various other preparations, including both meat and veggie dishes, - I've never ordered anything that I disliked or had to turn back, though I also can't remember a standout dish either. Dinner is not where the restaurant thrives, in my opinion "“ it's in some of the value propositions they offer at various times. The happy hour is good "“ a collection of $3 and $6 tapas and $3 drinks, though limited to the bar only. They have a special $20 prix-fixe lunch (which includes 20+ choices, though if I recall some of the more pricey fish and meat dishes are not included), as well as an $30 prix-fixe brunch menu on weekends , including alcohol. While there are some other solid brunch offerings in Silver Spring, La Malinche is one of the only ones that offers that sort of deal "“ and considering the quality and variety of the choices (though the options may sway a bit more towards the lunch end of the spectrum, if I recall), as well as the included alcohol (which is mimosas and bloody Marys, but also sangrias and draft beers), you can certainly get more value than you might at standard lunch and dinner sittings. Anyway, wanted to finally put this place on the board here "“ Don, while I don't necessarily agree with everything about the dining guide order in Silver Spring (and I'd be happy to parse that with you elsewhere), I think you can safely put this place in the middle of the pack (non-italicized) until you or others have a chance to explore it and chime in.
  12. La Cuchara website Located in the converted factory Meadow Mill across from Union Craft Brewing, La Cuchara opened in April from chef-owner Ben Lefenfeld, the former executive chef at Petit Louis. The review from the Baltimore Sun covers a lot and provides some pictures of the area, bar, grill (which I was impressed by - I'm not an expert on the subject but I'm told it's very unique to the region), and of course food. Gorelick seemed fairly impressed by most everything, so I'd recommend reading his professional review before diving into my amateur one. "La Cuchara and its Basque Cuisine Make a Bold Entrance" by Richard Gorelick on baltimoresun.com The menu changes daily, so don't expect to see the same things as below, but I'll outline everything anyways. I started off with a unique cocktail recommended by a friend, Bull's Blood (Red Beets, Green Hat Gin, Tarragon, Pepper, $11), which tasted like fresh beets. Obviously would not recommend if you don't like red beets because that's the bulk of the flavor, but it was extremely delicious to me. The other cocktail I had was the False Idol (Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Lemon, Agave Nectar, $10) described by Gorelick above and his review was spot-on so I won't say more other than I highly recommend it as well. I decided to explore the pintxos and tapas last night (but I'm told the duck confit entree is amazing), so we started off exploring the pintxos available. Very small portions, mostly served on skewers, were readily available upon ordering as they were prepared at the bar where we were sitting. The Tortilla Espanola and manchego/red onion/pedro ximenez were great starters while the jamon croquette was a highlight - this was just served individually FYI so harder to split than the skewars which were served as two pieces each. You'll be able to eyeball them at the bar or ask to see the serving sizes. We didn't sample a lot of the bread that was served after we ordered our tapas, but the four varieties were baked there and the couple small pieces I had were on point. We snacked on some shishito peppers, grilled and lightly salted/flavored, before squash blossoms were served - stuffed with goat cheese and fried, these were excellent - we were lucky to get the last order. We rounded everything off with a veal tenderloin that was very tender and flavorful and a variety of early summer vegetables served with a dollop of soft sheep's cheese. All in all, a great meal and experience. La Cuchara 3600 Clipper Mill Rd, Baltimore Open 7 days/week, 5p-10p (11p Fri & Sat)
  13. Hey how'd you do that Don? LOL Washington City Paper reports on an upcoming cider producer and pintxos bar that will also have various ciders on draft and by the bottle.
  14. I have been watching this place get whipped into shape and cannot wait for it to open. I love Spanish food and wine. I see promise for Ballston's food scene since the chef was the first chef at Taberna del Alabardero, which is a fantastic Spanish stable in the DC area. "SER Restaurant To Serve Up Spanish-Inspired Comfort Food In Arlington" by Mary Ann Barton on patch.com Team: Chef/Proprietor Josu Zubikarai Sous Chef David Sierra Business Operations/Proprietor Javier Candon Guest Relations/Proprietor Christiana Campos-Candon General Manager Merv Laihow
  15. Paella

    We recently had a discussion here about biryani vs. paella, but there was no Paella thread in the Washington DC Restaurants and Dining forum, so I'll start one. I know of no great paella being served in the DC area, but I did discover that Station 4 and their Venezuelan Chef Orlando Amaro features "Paella Night" each Wednesday from 5-11PM.
  16. With due credit to Eater, where I saw it, here it is.... I was convinced when I started watching it that I wouldn't sit through all 10 minutes. But after 2 minutes, I was hooked, and after 10 minutes, I played it again.
  17. Eventide is seeking a Pastry chef and Pastry assistant to head up our fabulous 2 person pastry team. The Pastry Chef position is ideally suited for a Pastry Cook or assistant that is ready to step into a starring role. The pastry department at Eventide is responsible for bread, dining room dessert and sunday brunch production. It is a chance to learn how to run a small department and spread your wings. Must have an eye for detail and your own ideas about pastry and also be willing to listen to direction. The pastry assistant position is strictly production and some assembly. Must be able to read and follow recipies and must be able to independently think and work unsupervised. This is not a learning position. You must have knowledge of breads, pastries, ice creams/sorbets and other various pastry related things. I am also looking for a pm line cook. Speaking spanish is a plus but not necessary. Please be professional and willing to work and learn. If you are someone that fits the descriptions above please pm me your resume. If you think you are someone who fits the descriptions above but have major emotional issues, a drug problem, are an alcoholic or are someone who has problems with punctuality, you will not fit in here just so you know, so don't send me your resume, you'll just be wasting your time and mine. The restaurant is located near the Clarendon metro at 3165 Wilson Blvd in Clarendon Virginia. Look it up on Google maps or whatever way you get directions. Consider that the very first part of the interview. The second part will be to see if you're smart enough to find the back door. Gunther Seeger in Atlanta always considered that a test for cooks. We never come in the front door. We provide the illusion for the guest, to come in the front door would destroy that illusion.
  18. Bobby Flay in the kitchen at his new restaurant, Gato, a new restaurant in Manhattan by Bobby Flay and Laurence Kretchmer, 324 Lafayette St. (NoHo), New York, NY, 212-334-6400. January 8, 2014. Photo by Gerry Dawes©2014 / gerrydawes@aol.com / Facebook / Twitter / Pinterest. Canon 5D Mark III / Canon 17-40mm f/4L USM. Appetizer from the kitchen menu: Oven roasted shrimp with diavolo oil and oregano at Bobby Flay's and Laurence Kretchmer's new restaurant, Gato, 324 Lafayette St., Manhattan (NoHo), 212-334-6400, January 8, 2014. Photo by Gerry Dawes©2014 / gerrydawes@aol.com / Facebook / Twitter / Pinterest. Panasonic Lumix DMC ZS30 43-86mm f3.3 "“ f6.4. Pizza with lamb sausage, tomato jam, mozzarella and mint at Bobby Flay's and Laurence Kretchmer's new restaurant, Gato, 324 Lafayette St., Manhattan (NoHo), 212-334-6400, January 8, 2014. Photo by Gerry Dawes©2014 / gerrydawes@aol.com / Facebook / Twitter / Pinterest. Panasonic Lumix DMC ZS30 43-86mm f3.3 "“ f6.4. Tarte tatin with salted Calvados caramel and vanilla-black pepper gelato at Bobby Flay's and Laurence Kretchmer's new restaurant, Gato, 324 Lafayette St., Manhattan (NoHo), 212-334-6400, January 8, 2014. Photo by Gerry Dawes©2014 / gerrydawes@aol.com / Facebook / Twitter / Pinterest. Panasonic Lumix DMC ZS30 43-86mm f3.3 "“ f6.4.
  19. This restaurant serves Tapas and Spanish style food on 14th Street. The service at this place is impeccable. While waiting in the bar, there were so many servers and bussers going past and instead of making you feel like they were in their way, they made you feel like they were in your way. The bartenders actively make eye contact with the patrons, instead of you fighting to get their attention. And, in case you didn't know, this place is packed to the brim nightly. I came tonight, on a cold DC Thursday expecting the absolute worst. I've walked in and walked out because I was told there was a 2 hour wait. They don't do many reservations, and I actually don't know their rules for doing them. We were told 1 hour and it ended up being close to 1 hour and 30 minutes. When I went up as the annoying guest asking "are we there yet?" they took the time to tell me why it was taking longer and then let us know an updated time, which was fairly accurate. We were seated by a vivacious and energetic hostess that had been dealing with impatient and likely rude guests all evening, and she never broke her smile the whole night. I came with 7+ a high chair for a 21 month old. We were placed at a cozy table and I'll tell the truth, we told them 6, and added one at last minute. We were those people. They added a chair and we got very close. Waters delivered immediately, two waiters introduced themselves, and took drink orders. They also told us that specific dishes took a long time (paella and grilled meat platters), which got us to put those in first. We ordered 2 patatas bravas, 2 asparagus with aioli, seafood paella, a churrasco, multiple hamachi crudos, gambas ajillo, 2 tortillas, blood sausage, 2 chorizo with fig, scallops, lamb chops, 2 lamb burgers, 2 beef empanadas.. I think that's all of it. The pacing was impeccable. Rarely were we overburdened. Service was slowed down when it needed to be, but with attention to whether we needed more drinks. The food quality was high - highlights included lamb chops, churrasco, chorizo, hamachi crudo... Paella was not like Barcelona the city, but tasty in it's own right. Not one dish was bad. I never order patatas bravas because stateside it's essentially French fries and hot sauce, but here the fiery tomato sauce and aioli made it impressive. I can't really get thinking about the food, even though it was fabulous, I'm just so impressed at the way the restaurant presented itself. A prince amongst men... I hated the idea of this place - a Connecticut chain, the hottest gals and guys in DC, a hostess that could be a model, a fancy bar and terribly long wait times. But, sometimes the execution and the effort overstate any potential negatives. If the food gets any better and the service stays the same, this place will last a long time. And, final caveat - I freaking hate tapas state side.
  20. New tapas restaurant in old Tackle Box space in Cleveland Park. http://www.pulpodc.com/ http://www.washingto...veland-park.php
  21. Seeing Katelin's post reminded me that a third encarnation of Boqueria was supposed to open this year at 1837 M Street (the old Penang space) - does anyone have any updates? Their DC website is here.
  22. After a long day of black Friday shopping Momma and I slipped into Boqueria for some tapas and drinks. This place isn't very big and was quite full, but we managed to have the perfect timing to grab a table. The hostess checked our shopping bags for us which was nice. We got a bottle of Valonga 2009, Chardonnay which was something Mom really liked, I wasn't as big of a fan, but was happy she was happy. We ordered a salad with blood oranges and grapefruit with a light vinagrette, chicken and blood sausage croquettes, lamb skewers and bread with tomato. The salad was really good, we had wanted something refreshing and this really was just that. The fruit was really ripe and had great flavors that went well with the other accompaniments of romaine and some sort of blue cheese and peanuts??? but it tasted very good. The lamb skewers were excellent, a little chew, but not abnormal for lamb and had great flavors. The croquettes were rich and almost creamy flavored inside, but with more of a shredded meat texture, I am not describing them in a very appealing way, they were a little strange, but good, I liked that they had interesting flavors. Mom and I both adored the simple but good bread with tomato. The flavor was just spot on a little salty, not too chewy, but just crusty enough with some small olives. This was a great place for dinner after a long day where we could just eat a bit of this and a bit of that. We really enjoyed all the food.
  23. I posted a review in Intrepid Traveler, but the Dining Guide includes Fauquier County, so here is another observation. In a few words, this is the best Cuban restaurant within 50 miles of Washington DC. Setting aside the noisy bar area and the slow service, this quaint little gem is decorated in a nice Cuban/Spanish style, and somewhat hidden in a large strip mall on the eastern edge of Warrenton. The food is very good, the prices are reasonable and the mojitos are great. I enjoyed a great tapas sampler tonight and I'm going back tomorrow for a Cubano sandwich. Tonight I had the pulpo (octopus) a la Gallega, spicy mussel tapa, scallops in paprika and lechon (pork) asado, all of which were spot on. I accompanied these dishes with a couple of mojitos, straight up originals instead of the many variations on the menu. I'll say that the octopus -- in a garlic-oil sauce with perfectly cooked potatoes -- was superb. The scallops in paprika were perfect, fresh and moist on the inside and nicely crisp on the outside. The lechon was the best pork dish I can remember enjoying in a long while, nicely specked with fresh chopped onions and fresh parsley. And the spicy mussels were buried under a spicy tomato sauce that begged to be sopped up with all the bread in sight. And speaking of bread, before all the tapas arrived there was bread on the table with an interesting dipping sauce of oil, lemon, garlic and grated cheese, so there wasn't a lot of leftover bread! And these four dishes, with two mojitos for me and two glasses of wine for Lady Kibbee, along with tax and generous tip, added up to a mere $80. I'll admit my judgment may be a bit blurred by a pair of mojitos, but I have been searching the DC metropolitan area for good Cuban fare for years. If I bite into a decent Cubano sandwich there tomorrow, I will sing the praises of this place high and low, near and far. Please add this jewel to the Fauquier County list in the Dining Guide, and count on multiple additional visits from Kibbee Nayee in the future. UPDATE -- Returned today for the Cubano sandwich, and it was very good. I can't truly say it was better than any Cubano in the DC area -- there was one at Acadiana as a special that was about as good, but it trounces anything I've tried at Cuba Libre or Fast Gourmet, for example. The bread was perfectly pressed, and the ham and Swiss cheese inside were very nicely warm, balanced against the briny crunch of the pickle. The pork looked like the pieces of pork that otherwise ends up as lechon asado, but this was a darned good sandwich. I swapped the side of fries for the plantains, and I'm glad I did. Crisply sweet on the outside and almost creamy on the inside, they were very good. I declare this restaurant the best Cuban restaurant in our extended area, and despite the trek, it's a heck of a lot closer than Miami.
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