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Does anyone have recommendations on where to find delicious dill pickles?

I'd love to find some at a farmer's market. Any ideas on markets where they are available? If you have a favorite, let me know.

Thank you.

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Sour Mexican gherkins from the community sharecropping garden . Not exactly a cucumber, but pickled as a diminutive one.

Planet of the Grapes.

5932945274_26782580e5.jpg

Itty bitty pickle tickle.

5932332597_ba232b3ba3.jpg

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Sour Mexican gherkins from the community sharecropping garden . Not exactly a cucumber, but pickled as a diminutive one.

If they aren't exactly cucumbers, what are they? And how did you make the pickles? I see red pepper and possibly a slice of garlic.

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Cucmber relative cucumis anguria (anguria = watermelon) as opposed to cucumis sativa.

Fresh pickle with white wine vinegar, water, salt, black pepper, mustard seed, coriander, dill flowers, contact lense, chili, garlic.

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Cucmber relative cucumis anguria (anguria = watermelon) as opposed to cucumis sativa.

Fresh pickle with white wine vinegar, water, salt, black pepper, mustard seed, coriander, dill flowers, contact lense, chili, garlic.

Ahah! At last, the secret to great pickles is revealed!

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Does anyone have recommendations on where to find delicious dill pickles?

I'd love to find some at a farmer's market. Any ideas on markets where they are available? If you have a favorite, let me know.

Thank you.

North Mt. Pastures and Mt. View both sell pickles. Both are at some of marketfan's markets (U St. & 14th on Saturdays, for example) and the former at FRESHFARM Market's market at Silver Spring, also on Saturday, and the latter on Thursdays at the Penn Quarter market. Shawna (Mt. V) just started the line and I tasted a fabulous spicy cucumber pickle today. I love NMtP's red/pink sauerkraut. Both do kim chee, too.

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According to the Post and from what I've seen around town, DC is having a pickle purveyor boom. Per the Post article, most of the picklers make quick pickles with vinegar, which can be great, but are different from traditional fermented pickles that rely on natural bacteria to turn the veggies into pickles.

Recently, I ran across Number 1 Sons at the White House farmer's market and sampled a bunch of their stuff - which they'll happily tell you they are the only fermented pickler in the area . Overall I was very impressed. I liked the super sour whole sour pickles (bought a quart), the tailgate mambos were very different but good - strong aromatic like cloves (good for a few or maybe a pickle sampler, so I only got a few spears). They also sauerkraut, kimchi, kimchi cuke combo, half sours, but they were out of the Kicky Kosher (dill pickles with heat that I've tasted before and like if you want a really good traditional pickle with the added hot pepper burn). I'm not a fan of half-sour pickles - they are generally just cucumbers with lots of salt flavor. However, I found the Number 1 Sonds half-sours to taste actually like a mild pickle - not bad.

Back at home, someone had brought a quart of full sours from Oh Pickles at Union Market. So what to do but have a pickle taste test. Number 1 Sons won hands down. Their pickles are not only sour and a bit salty but have garlic and other spice flavor notes. Whereas Oh Pickles were good pickles, but only tasted of sour and salt. I'd still get eat them happily, but Number 1 Sons really takes the flavor to the next level.

So what are some other good local pickles to try?

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Number One Sons is also at the Courthouse Market in Arlington on Saturdays.

And Bloomingdale on Sundays. I sampled several of their offerings this week and last, and overall they are far and above Oh, Pickles! as mentioned above. With the pricing they would only be an occasional splurge (I took home a teeny, tiny container of the kimchee cukes: $5!).

North Mountain Pastures had some really interesting riffs on kimchee last year. I'm hoping that when more varieties of summer produce comes in season they will do that again.

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I am watching my pickled turnips become pinker every day, and the target day for serving is Sunday (I pickled them Monday). I boiled water, white vinegar, sugar and salt to dissolve everything. In the jars with the turnips, cut like french fries, I put a slice of beet for color, dried cayene peppers and whole garlic cloves. Trying to recreate turnips served at a local Middle Eastern restaurant. They won't keep past a few weeks, so I am going to get creative after serving them in Sunday's appetizer tray.

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I am watching my pickled turnips become pinker every day, and the target day for serving is Sunday (I pickled them Monday). I boiled water, white vinegar, sugar and salt to dissolve everything. In the jars with the turnips, cut like french fries, I put a slice of beet for color, dried cayene peppers and whole garlic cloves. Trying to recreate turnips served at a local Middle Eastern restaurant. They won't keep past a few weeks, so I am going to get creative after serving them in Sunday's appetizer tray.

Sounds delicious!

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Anyone pickle radishes and have a good recipe? Have a bunch and not sure what to do with them. Already added to salad.

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I am watching my pickled turnips become pinker every day, and the target day for serving is Sunday (I pickled them Monday). I boiled water, white vinegar, sugar and salt to dissolve everything. In the jars with the turnips, cut like french fries, I put a slice of beet for color, dried cayene peppers and whole garlic cloves. Trying to recreate turnips served at a local Middle Eastern restaurant. They won't keep past a few weeks, so I am going to get creative after serving them in Sunday's appetizer tray.

Pickled turnips were successful. I would have liked more heat, though. Next time I will use more chilis. Partner's very picky mother scarfed them down, proclaiming them delicious. Does anyone know if I could do the quick method (no boiling water processing) for beets? I have the equipment for proper canning, but am waiting for lessons from a friend when out schedules mesh. So, until then, it's just quick method pickling.

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Being BklynBoy, I love the pickles from Guss Pickles. We used to stop at their lower east side stand when I was a kid. Balducci's used to carry them, but stopped earlier this year. You can order them from their web site

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I need some info/advice. I have been reading on web sites of state extension services to learn about canning salsa (water bath). I feel informed about the basic process, the special cautions of dealing with low acid foods, etc. I understand that a certain amount of acid must be used based on the quantity of other ingredients. So, two questions still unanswered. 1. Corn: Corn is so good now. Can I add corn to canned salsa? Would I substitute corn for some quantity of tomatoes? Or for some quantity of peppers (I want it to be fairly spicy). 2: Timing of prep: Can I make the salsa on one day, and reheat to boiling to can the next day? is there any reason the canning has to take place immediately after the initial cooking of the mixture?

Thanks for any help you can provide. I don't want to kill anyone with my creativity.

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I need some info/advice. I have been reading on web sites of state extension services to learn about canning salsa (water bath). I feel informed about the basic process, the special cautions of dealing with low acid foods, etc. I understand that a certain amount of acid must be used based on the quantity of other ingredients. So, two questions still unanswered. 1. Corn: Corn is so good now. Can I add corn to canned salsa? Would I substitute corn for some quantity of tomatoes? Or for some quantity of peppers (I want it to be fairly spicy). 2: Timing of prep: Can I make the salsa on one day, and reheat to boiling to can the next day? is there any reason the canning has to take place immediately after the initial cooking of the mixture?

Thanks for any help you can provide. I don't want to kill anyone with my creativity.

Corn is much better frozen than canned, for both flavor and texture. Flash blanch corn cobs, cut kernels off the cob, freeze on a parchment lined tray, then bag the frozen kernels in zip-lock or vacuum bags. Unless your salsa has a very high percentage of vinegar in it, it should be pressure canned, not water bath canned. Tomatoes are the only vegetable safe to water bath can. Follow a certified recipe for the salsa to the letter, and then add some corn when you open the jar down the line and serve it. It's too risky to monkey around with preserving food in jars.
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Corn is much better frozen than canned, for both flavor and texture. Flash blanch corn cobs, cut kernels off the cob, freeze on a parchment lined tray, then bag the frozen kernels in zip-lock or vacuum bags. Unless your salsa has a very high percentage of vinegar in it, it should be pressure canned, not water bath canned. Tomatoes are the only vegetable safe to water bath can. Follow a certified recipe for the salsa to the letter, and then add some corn when you open the jar down the line and serve it. It's too risky to monkey around with preserving food in jars.

Thanks. I made salsa yesterday, but froze it instead of canning it. I am going to freeze the corn, too. I think I will reserve my canning for pickles and jam.

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I need some info/advice. I have been reading on web sites of state extension services to learn about canning salsa (water bath). I feel informed about the basic process, the special cautions of dealing with low acid foods, etc. I understand that a certain amount of acid must be used based on the quantity of other ingredients. So, two questions still unanswered. 1. Corn: Corn is so good now. Can I add corn to canned salsa? Would I substitute corn for some quantity of tomatoes? Or for some quantity of peppers (I want it to be fairly spicy). 2: Timing of prep: Can I make the salsa on one day, and reheat to boiling to can the next day? is there any reason the canning has to take place immediately after the initial cooking of the mixture?

Thanks for any help you can provide. I don't want to kill anyone with my creativity.

Too late for now, but for next time...

1.  You can probably find a recipe online that will have corn in it, or pick up the USDA or Ball canning books from the library.  They have various recipes for salsas and chutneys that can be canned with a water bath.  Here's a quick link to the UGA site.  As you can see, the trick is to add something acidic like vinegar to the mix.  If you still want to do something with corn this season, I can look through my books later when I'm at home. 

2.  You can reheat it for hot pack, but there will be some degradation of the materials from two heating cycles, and you will have to boil it for a full ten minutes to make certain botulism gets killed.

You must have more freezer space than I do. :)

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You must have more freezer space than I do. :)

Fortunately, I was convinced to get a full sized upright freezer for the basement. My partner then bought me (us) a vacuum food sealer, a food processor and a set of canning equipment and supplies. So I am taking advantage of summer's bounty this year, like never before.
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My summer of pickle tasting continues. I've now become a huge Number 1 Sons pickle fan. I was out doing non-food shopping and when I saw their booth across U street at the farmer's market, I literally ran over. There booths are great because they put out samples of everything they currently have so you can try anything or in my case everything before you buy. They had a new pickle - more yellowish that was pickled with horseradish for a different type of tasty zing. The dill spears and baby gherkins were great and came home. My new favorite were the pickled beets - while retaining that sugary sweetness, the pickling mellows and rounds out the flavor. I keep offering some I bought to friends and so many people says I don't like beets, but they all ask for more after I convince them to try these ones. So good!

I also sucessfully made my own vietnamese style pickled daikon and carrots. Usually you get this shredded/juillened as a garnish for various vietnamese dishes including banh mi and I always devour it, so I realized I should make my own mega batch to add to anything or just for snacking. It was super easy and delicious - crunchy, pickly and sweet.  Although I will warn those that after a while of being in the fridge, it has a pretty funky odor when you pop the lid, but the taste is great. I'm still eating my original batch from several weeks ago. I used this recipe with modified proportions - http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/vietnamese_daikon_and_carrot_pickles/.

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