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2 Amys, Wisconsin Ave. and Macomb Street - Great Wine, Small Plates, Pizza, and Desserts

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3 minutes ago, jandres374 said:

Who knew the back bar had a name. Serenity Now.

I just had those Sicilian Anchovies last week - at $6, they're the least-expensive of the three on offer, and with the olive oil, bread, and butter, virtually indistinguishable: I get them every time I go now. I could have *just this* as my last meal.

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Love the anchovies with bread and butter.  We always order them as part of our first salvo. 

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14 hours ago, silentbob said:

What time can we start ordering from the wine bar menu?  Is 5 or 5:30 too early?

All day long, unless there's something I don't know. One thing people haven't mentioned about the wine bar menu is that the foods are largely pre-made - sometimes something will need to be warmed up, but more often than not, the wine bar menu features room-temperature items. If you aren't sitting at the bar, simply walk up to it, and take note of what looks good - I had a frtitata there last time that was the best I'd ever eaten (and I must surely have had frittatas (frittati?) fifty times in my life).

Go early, go often - you won't believe how much you enjoy it, even when it isn't perfect. Regarding the anchovies, get the cheapest of the three (Sicilian, I believe, and I think they're $6 (if I recall, the other two selections are $7 and $8)) - they're large, *and* they're darned good - put one on a piece of buttered bread (I think they come with bread and butter; if not, make sure something you order does). You'll think you're in heaven, and may just put in for a second order.

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3 hours ago, DonRocks said:

All day long, unless there's something I don't know. One thing people haven't mentioned about the wine bar menu is that the foods are largely pre-made - sometimes something will need to be warmed up, but more often than not, the wine bar menu features room-temperature items. If you aren't sitting at the bar, simply walk up to it, and take note of what looks good - I had a frtitata there last time that was the best I'd ever eaten (and I must surely have had frittatas (frittati?) fifty times in my life).

Go early, go often - you won't believe how much you enjoy it, even when it isn't perfect. Regarding the anchovies, get the cheapest of the three (Sicilian, I believe, and I think they're $6 (Iif I recall, the other two selections are $7 and $8)) - they're large, *and* they're darned good - put one on a piece of buttered bread (I think they come with bread and butter; if not, make sure something you order does). You'll think you're in heaven, and may just put in for a second order.

Actually, the wine bar menu is generally only available in the evening.

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10 minutes ago, Marty L. said:

Actually, the wine bar menu is generally only available in the evening.

Really?! As many times as I've been here mid-afternoon, and I didn't even know this? Odd.

Is this true on Sundays as well? These are the days I usually come earlier.

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5 minutes ago, DonRocks said:

Really?! As many times as I've been here mid-afternoon, and I didn't even know this? Odd.

Is this true on Sundays as well? These are the days I usually come earlier.

Just checked -- I suppose it depends upon what you consider "mid-afternoon"!  ;-)   4:00 on weekends; 5:00 M-F.

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1 hour ago, Marty L. said:

Just checked -- I suppose it depends upon what you consider "mid-afternoon"!  ;-)   4:00 on weekends; 5:00 M-F.

That makes sense - I often come here late Sunday afternoons (thanks for checking, btw).

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13 hours ago, DonRocks said:

All day long, unless there's something I don't know. One thing people haven't mentioned about the wine bar menu is that the foods are largely pre-made - sometimes something will need to be warmed up, but more often than not, the wine bar menu features room-temperature items. If you aren't sitting at the bar, simply walk up to it, and take note of what looks good - I had a frtitata there last time that was the best I'd ever eaten (and I must surely have had frittatas (frittati?) fifty times in my life).

Go early, go often - you won't believe how much you enjoy it, even when it isn't perfect. Regarding the anchovies, get the cheapest of the three (Sicilian, I believe, and I think they're $6 (if I recall, the other two selections are $7 and $8)) - they're large, *and* they're darned good - put one on a piece of buttered bread (I think they come with bread and butter; if not, make sure something you order does). You'll think you're in heaven, and may just put in for a second order.

I once asked a waiter there if he thought the more expensive anchovies tasted better and he rolled his eyes and said it was barely possible to tell the difference so I've never ordered anything but the Sicilian ones since.  They are great, and do always come with bread and butter.

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4 hours ago, DonRocks said:

That makes sense - I often come here late Sunday afternoons (thanks for checking, btw).

First real sign of Spring:  Ramps on the pizza tonight.  Plus fantastic braised fava beans with sheep's milk and a new wheat bread that they're milling themselves.  And strawberries from "Harry's Berries" in California (I was dubious about April berries--but sure enough, they're quite good), with gragnano, vanilla ice cream and shortbread.

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4 hours ago, Rhone1998 said:

I once asked a waiter there if he thought the more expensive anchovies tasted better and he rolled his eyes and said it was barely possible to tell the difference so I've never ordered anything but the Sicilian ones since.  They are great, and do always come with bread and butter.

I went through this little exercise on my own, came to the same conclusion, and haven't ordered anything but the Sicilian anchovies since.

Peter, if you're reading this, consider making an order of six anchovies (instead of four), featuring two-each of the three different types? That way, diners can make a direct comparison - sort of like a "wine tasting," but an "anchovy tasting." This is something I'd order, because if you order only one type, the frame-of-reference is missing, so trying the more-expensive versions by themselves just isn't worth it (to me, anyway).

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56-oz. ribeye for $65 tonight. Oh, and morels and ramps on pizzas. And porchetta. And raspberry ice cream.  And . . . they have a new mill with which they're making a delicious wheat bread to go with various things. Spring at 2 Amys is as good as DC gets.

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To add onto the anchovy stories, you are in for a treat if you hit Two Amys when they have fried anchovy bones on the menu. They are the perfect beer snack - salty, fried and crunchy. I was told several months ago fried anchovy night is on Tuesdays, as Tuesday is the day they break down the little fish. Order early though because they once ran out of them by 7:30 one Tuesday when I was there.

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Best seven dollars I've spent in a long time: 

chopped squab giblet toast with pickles and parsley 

[unfortunately, the squab is apparently a rare treat, but keep an eye out for it]

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28 minutes ago, Marty L. said:

Best seven dollars I've spent in a long time: 

chopped squab giblet toast with pickles and parsley 

[unfortunately, the squab is apparently a rare treat, but keep an eye out for it]

I was on the way there tonight, before I suddenly got a "better" idea. :(

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1 hour ago, Marty L. said:

Best seven dollars I've spent in a long time: 

chopped squab giblet toast with pickles and parsley 

[unfortunately, the squab is apparently a rare treat, but keep an eye out for it]

Let me get this straight.  You had giblets of squab, but no squab meat?  How much giblets were there?  Any free or paid parking?

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Hunt for street parking or half a block down from 2 Amy's on the right is the entrance to a parking lot which was built for the Giant and Cathedral Commons development.  

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You guys are killing me.  I live too far from Two Amy’s, but used to go all the time. If there was a list of “most underrated all time best restaurants “it would include Twoa Amy’s, and Ray’s the Steaks”.

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In this podcast--which you should listen to for several reasons, most importantly, what they have to say about DC Initiative 77--there's a "rapid fire Qs" segment at the end in which Jill Tyler (Tail up Goat) is asked "What's your idea of the perfect D.C. date night?"  Her immediate response:  "The bar at 2 Amys, no question"--and Cizuka Seki (Seki) and Clementine Thomas (Chez Billy) readily concur.  Wise women:  heed their advice (not only on 2 Amys, but 77, too).

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Thoroughly enjoyable and quick meal at the 2Amy's bar last night. Steak tartare, coquettes and a pizza to take home, washed down with a couple glasses of rose. Been here countless times before, always look forward to returning.

(Don, I'll say hi next time).

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1 hour ago, Keithstg said:

(Don, I'll say hi next time).

I had a feeling that might have been you - either you, or someone else here. The exit conversation went something like this:

"Those people sitting next to us seemed knowledgeable."
"They are."

(I wasn't eavesdropping; there were a couple of comments I overheard which raised my antennae.)

Cheers Keith!
Uncle Martin

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20 minutes ago, DonRocks said:

I had a feeling that might have been you - either you, or someone else here. The exit conversation went something like this:

"Those people sitting next to us seemed knowledgeable."
"They are."

(I wasn't eavesdropping; there were a couple of comments I overheard which raised my antennae.)

Cheers Keith!
Uncle Martin

Cheers!😎

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2 Amys is a diner's best friend - the most important restaurant in the history of Washington, DC remains one of its very best, serving such diverse customers as families with infants in strollers, older couples out on date night, and award-winning chefs (chefs eat here all the time).

It's a well-known "secret" in the DC dining community that the small plates offered at the bar (which can be ordered in the main dining area) rotate on a regular basis, and is essentially Peter Pastan's playground for experimenting with new and seasonal dishes.

What isn't well-known is that legendary bar chef Scott Hager - who became a local celebrity by being drawn on 2 Amys menu (yes, that gentleman with the glasses was Scott) - has left and returned to Chesapeake, Virginia after many years running the food bar here. This Tuesday, the bar food was being made by a gentleman of enormous passion, creativity, and respect for tradition: Rick Cook, who has come from Etto, and who worked at both BlackSaltm and at The Grill Room with the legendary Frank Ruta.

Perhaps even less-known is that once or twice a week - sometimes early on Tuesdays and Fridays - the wonderful trilogy of anchovies 2 Amys serves are de-boned, each one by hand, and instead of discarding the bones, they're lightly coated and fried, resulting in one of the most delicious bar snacks you'll ever taste - served in a basket atop a white napkin, as if they were potato chips, these bones are the essence of the anchovy, crispy like thin pretzels but with the flavor of the ocean, and not at all sharp. As the anchovies are packed in liquid, they're salty as you would expect, making them the perfect beer snack.

Alas, this past Tuesday, my dining companion and I saw them sitting out on the bar, having arrived just before 5:30 on Tuesday to an almost completely empty restaurant. We ordered a carafe of the 2015 2 Amys' 'No Longer' Rosé (a classic example of an "orange wine," which goes perfectly with this - I urge you to try this combination if you get the chance). We were treated to one of the humblest and finest food and wine pairings you could imagine, and our little basket of fried anchovy bones went a shockingly long way - these things are deceptively rich, and even though it didn't look like much, we ate our fill, and then some.

And it's a good thing, because there were only *three* orders for the entire evening, and I must re-emphasize: They only de-bone the anchovies once or twice a week (Tuesdays and Fridays are your best bet, but you should check before committing). At $4 per order - especially considering the labor-intensive nature of these anchovy bones - this is not a money-maker for 2 Amys; it's a labor of love, walking the walk when it comes to using the whole animal and minimizing waste - this is precisely what Peter Pastan - and more recently Rick Cook - have always espoused, and it's on full display here.

Fried Anchovy Bones with a carafe of 2 Amys' 'No Longer' Rosé - a match made in, well, a match made under the sea and under the soil. Get them, and then try anything and everything else you see that looks or sounds good - do not hesitate to turn yourself over to the hands of Rick and the wonderful bartender Allie: They will help you to dine, and to dine well.

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