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Piola, A Chain Based in Treviso, Italy in Rosslyn and Cardozo

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I noticed that Piola (Pizza) is opening in Rosslyn next to Cafe Asia. I'm sure it's just some international corporate mess (their other U.S. locations are in Miami and New York), but has anyone ever been who can tell me something more?

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I noticed that Piola (Pizza) is opening in Rosslyn next to Cafe Asia. I'm sure it's just some international corporate mess (their other U.S. locations are in Miami and New York), but has anyone ever been who can tell me something more?
That should be nominated for one of the most annoying websites. Almost every you click is followed by a pop-up. Simply horrible.

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That should be nominated for one of the most annoying websites. Almost every you click is followed by a pop-up. Simply horrible.
abso f'ing lutely

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abso f'ing lutely
Use Firefox and turn the pop-up blocking on. I haven't seen one in almost 2 years. Now back to the topic...what is your opinion of the food Eric?

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Use Firefox and turn the pop-up blocking on. I haven't seen one in almost 2 years. Now back to the topic...what is your opinion of the food Eric?
I had it once in the new york location, back when Mary was living in the city. I thought it was tasty as far as chains go. The size of the menu is incredible but it is similar to those restaurants that have caesar salad as an entree and then also list caesar with chicken as an entree. kind of redundant. The crust was crisp, however. I can't recall exactly which pie I had. I have never been to Italy, so I can't tell you what authentic pizza should taste like. But I am a fan of all the usual suspects, 2 amys, matchbox, etc.

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I noticed that Piola (Pizza) is opening in Rosslyn next to Cafe Asia. I'm sure it's just some international corporate mess (their other U.S. locations are in Miami and New York), but has anyone ever been who can tell me something more?
Beau and I walked past the NY location on our way to Hearth a couple of weeks ago and noticed a large sign out front indicating their next restaurant would be in Virginia. They're a bit geographically-impaired, however, since the map pointed to a location next to the Capital building in DC.

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I noticed that Piola (Pizza) is opening in Rosslyn next to Cafe Asia. I'm sure it's just some international corporate mess (their other U.S. locations are in Miami and New York), but has anyone ever been who can tell me something more?
Piola's now open, Going Out Gurus report here.

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Piola's now open, Going Out Gurus report here.

Hmmm, sounds like the GOG is saying that it is even better than 2 Amy's or Paradiso. Am I the only one a little bit skeptical with that claim? I am in the area enough that I will have to try it out.

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Wondering what to do for dinner last night I remembered this and decided to try it out.

They say they use a wood burning oven and it is the first thing you notice when you enter. The ventilation system must not be working correctly as you can detect the odor of burning wood, not overpowering, but noticeable. The place is brightly decorated and trying to be too hip, but considering where the other outposts are it is not a big surprise.

On to the food. The menu is huge and they offer both the Italian thin crust pizza (way too many different varieties), about 5 Neapolitan style pizzas, pastas, starters, etc.

To start we ordered the Torcello, which for $9.50, you get canned white tuna (which may or may not be from Italy) mixed with white beans served atop flavorful sliced plum tomatoes and topped with chopped scallions. Not only did the dish need salt, but some decent olive oil packed tuna would have been a huge help. We ate this with the flavorless house-baked bread that was brought to the table.

For pizzas we decided on one thin crust, the Como, and one Neapolitan, of which I forgot the name. The Como, $14.95, comes with mozzarella (not fresh as indicated for some pizzas), parma ham, tomato sauce, and porcini mushrooms. I am not a fan of this style of pizza and it was just OK, with the tomato going nicely with the ham, and the measly portion of porcinis. The crust was properly cooked, but lacked any good dough flavor. My pizza, $11.45, was topped with fresh mozzarella, anchovies, tomato sauce, and unfortunately a healthy dose of dried herbs. The cheese was cut way too small to hold up to the cooking process and just about disappeared. Again the crust was cooked well, but lacked any flavor. We declined to try any of there Piola made (there or some corporate warehouse) desserts.

As you can probably tell we will not be back, especially since 2 Amy's and Paradiso are worlds better.

Total for dinner with 2 beers was $49.13 before tip. To quote Rocks, "spending my money so that you don't have to."

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On to the food. The menu is huge and they offer both the Italian thin crust pizza (way too many different varieties), about 5 Neapolitan style pizzas, pastas, starters, etc.
What is the distinction between "Italian thin crust" and "Neapolitan style"? Also, it's not surprising that the food at Piola would be indifferent. Their annoying WEBSITE is all concept and hipness, with hardly any information (that I could discover) about their food. I won't be rushing across the river to this place.

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What is the distinction between "Italian thin crust" and "Neapolitan style"? Also, it's not surprising that the food at Piola would be indifferent. Their annoying WEBSITE is all concept and hipness, with hardly any information (that I could discover) about their food. I won't be rushing across the river to this place.

Italian thin crust is more cracker like without a rim of crust around the pizza. Neapolitan is slightly thicker and there is a rim of 1-2" around the outside, think 2 Amy's.

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Italian thin crust is more cracker like without a rim of crust around the pizza. Neapolitan is slightly thicker and there is a rim of 1-2" around the outside, think 2 Amy's.
Do they serve "Italian thin crust" in Italy? I've eaten pizza in several different parts of Italy, including Naples, and it's pretty much all been as you describe Neapolitan. I blush to reveal that I've never been to 2 Amy's.

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Do they serve "Italian thin crust" in Italy? I've eaten pizza in several different parts of Italy, including Naples, and it's pretty much all been as you describe Neapolitan. I blush to reveal that I've never been to 2 Amy's.

Sure do. I have had it in Rome, places in Tuscany and in Abruzzo.

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Do they serve "Italian thin crust" in Italy?

Yes, but they just call it "thin crust". :)

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Do they serve "Italian thin crust" in Italy? I've eaten pizza in several different parts of Italy, including Naples, and it's pretty much all been as you describe Neapolitan. I blush to reveal that I've never been to 2 Amy's.

Pizza, like everything else in Italy is regional.

If the pizzaualo is from Naples, the pizza will be a little thicker with a distinct rim of crust. The rim will be thicker. The topping will be spread leaving a 1-2" rim. If from Lazio, the crust will be crackery and more burnt on the bottom and the topping will be spread closer to the rim.

Sicilia is famous for foccacia and this is often sold as pizza al taglio all over italy. They are pan crust pizze smeared with topping.

In the Emilia, rolled pizze are common with the topping spread out in bands on a long crust. The width of the band is determined by the length of the crust.

When Pizzauoli move acorss the country, they take their styles with them. Over time the styles take on some of the culture of the region that the individual settles down in. Hence in the Emilia you can get a Sicilian style pizza made with prosciutto where in Sicilia, traditionally they do not make prosciutto, so a traditional pizza would probably use something like a sopressata piccante.

And all of this ignores the Neopolitan idea that Pizza was invented in Napoli for the visit of Queen Margherita and that there are only one real pizze: Margherita (mozzarella, tomato sauce and basil for the flag). But even they recognize that foccacia is a historical antecedent of the Pizze Margarita and eated widely. There are many other recipes of what would only be looked upon as pizza extant. And do you think a baker woould take a newly invented dish, made out of imagination and whole cloth and give it to his Queen? Maybe but probably quite dangerous. I think the dish predated Queen M's visit and grew out of other traditions.

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And all of this ignores the Neopolitan idea that Pizza was invented in Napoli for the visit of Queen Margherita and that there are only one real pizze: Margherita (mozzarella, tomato sauce and basil for the flag).

It was not pizza that was invented, but the combination of ingredients to make the Margherita, basil, fresh mozzarella, and tomato sauce representing the three colors of the Italian flag.

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It was not pizza that was invented, but the combination of ingredients to make the Margherita, basil, fresh mozzarella, and tomato sauce representing the three colors of the Italian flag.

True...click for the history of pizza. Additionally, I've read and heard more often than not that the true Margherita pizza was/is made with tomatoes, i.e. fresh, not tomato sauce.

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Another interesting history of pizza at this link, including the obligatory reference to Apicius :)

Ed Levine reports that the word "pizza" appears in print as early as 997AD, and observes that to this day, pizza in Naples is typically made with tomatoes, chunked or Mouli'd, not tomato sauce.

(maybe this tangent belongs somewhere other than the Piola thread...)

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Another interesting history of pizza at this link, including the obligatory reference to Apicius :)

Ed Levine reports that the word "pizza" appears in print as early as 997AD, and observes that to this day, pizza in Naples is typically made with tomatoes, chunked or Mouli'd, not tomato sauce.

(maybe this tangent belongs somewhere other than the Piola thread...)

Absolutely!

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Milady and I went to Piola for lunch on Labor Day, so I can't talk about the service being indicative of anything as we were the only ones in the place (they were prompt and courteous). I had the carbonara pizza and she had the smoked salmon penne.

First things first, the pizza is pretty good. The crust is thin and crispy right up until it gets towards the center of the pie, at which point it becomes that fabulous floppy grease trap. It's a study in opposites, I know that doesn't appeal to everyone. The sauce is thin, but tasty and the ingredients weren't laid on so thick that you couldn't pick a slice up without it collapsing. Pretty good. The pasta was also tasty, with the salmon kind of sneaking in instead of overwhelming.

However, for the food you get I find the prices to be a little steep and I realize why. The space itself is very modisch, with mismatched furniture in the lounge and textured steel tables. I know this is meant to appeal to the young horny folk who can sometimes overflow from Cafe Asia next door and I know they can charge $10 and up for a small pizza because it's a sit-down dining experience with cloth napkins, but there's that calculated nod of "your internship didn't turn out to be very impressive with the opposite sex; try our pizza and booze."

Meh. I'll go back, but I know I'm not one of the beautiful people. I just eat well and marry better. So there.

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Not a fan. Between the loud music, blinding decor, and mediocre pizza, I won't be returning anytime soon. As a table we ordered four different thin crust pizzas - the four cheese (which included brie), a tomato, mozzarella, and gorgonzola mix, a eggplant, sweet pepper mix, and an anchovies, olive, herbs and more mix. Of the four, I liked the four cheese the best, as the brie was a welcome topping. The second suffered from being too cheesy (and not in a good way) and the eggplant came off as bland. The last pizza was difficult to separate from the taste of the anchovies, but aside from them might have been decent. I did like the crust, but it wasn't anything special. Certainly not comparable to 2 Amys or Pizza Paradiso.

The wine list is surprisingly expensive and quite limited as well. I guess it could be an okay happy hour destination, if you like that sort of scene, but when in Rosslyn, I'll stick to the tried and true like Ray's or Pho 75.

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Hmmm, sounds like the GOG is saying that it is even better than 2 Amy's or Paradiso. Am I the only one a little bit skeptical with that claim? I am in the area enough that I will have to try it out.

The pizza is OK, not the best I've ever had, but pretty decent. The restaurant is a welcome addition to the concrete wasteland that is Rosslyn.

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