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Acadiana, 9th St and New York Avenue NW - Chef Brant Tesky Moves Up from Sous Chef

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not much other than it's supposed to be creole/new orleans influenced, which would make the name misleading. the cooking in acadiana, cajun country, is pretty different from that of creole/nola.

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I just recieved a preview menu. Some highlights (okay, so most of it looks good to me):

Soups

Smoked Chicken and Andouille Sausage Gumbo
7
 
Classic Turtle Soup
Traditional Garnishes, Dry Sherry Splash
8
 
Oyster Rockefeller Soup
Spinach, Pernod and Brie
8
 
Trio of Soups
Demi-Tasse Tasting of our Three Soups
 
Appetizers
Baked Oyster and Fresh Artichoke Gratin
Cured Country Ham, Parmesan Brioche Crumb
11
 
Fried Green Tomatoes
Spiced Boiled Gulf Shrimp Remoulade
11
 
Iced Louisiana P & J Oysters on the Half Shell
Cocktail Sauce, Saltine Crackers
9
 
Trio of Deviled Eggs
Crabmeat Ravigote, Shrimp Remoulade, Louisiana Choupique Caviar
9
 
Charbroiled Louisiana Oysters
Garlic Butter, Parmesan Romano Cheese, Warm French Bread
10
 
Pan Seared Hudson Valley Foie Gras
Pain Perdu, Mayhaw Jelly
14
 
Duo of "Pies"
Natchitoches Meat Pies - Black Pepper Buttermilk Dipping Sauce and Louisiana Crawfish Pies
9
 
Entrees
Aunt Boo's Fish Camp Crawfish Stew
Louisiana Mahatma Rice, Crawfish Hushpuppies
20
 
Pan Roasted Duck
Dirty Rice, Collard Greens, Cane Syrup Pepper Jelly Glaze
21
 
Grilled Gulf Redfish
Seafood and Andouille Jambalaya Risotto, Smoked Red Bell Pepper Sauce
22
 
Jumbo Lump Crabcakes
Pickled Okra, Mirliton and Roasted Corn Relish, Chipotle Remoulade
26
 
Pan Seared Louisiana Black Fish
Crabmeat Maque Choux, Creole Mustard Sauce
21
 
"Grillades and Grits"
Sautéed Veal Medallions, Creamy Jalapeí±o Cheese Grits, Wild Mushroom Pan Gravy
26
 
New Orleans Style Barbeque Shrimp
Garlic Butter, Black Pepper, Worcestershire Sauce, Warm French Bread
22
 
American Red Snapper
Sweet Corn Pudding, Toasted Almond Creole Meunière Sauce
24
 
Sweet Onion and Andouille Crusted Scamp Grouper
Brabant Sweet Potato Hash, Green Onion Butter
23
 
Grilled Beef Tenderloin Filet
Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes, Tasso Marchand du Vin Sauce, Blue Cheese
27
 
Blackened Yellowfin Tuna
Grit Soufflée, Creole Cream Cheese Spinach, Shrimp ètouffée
25
 
Dessert
(all desserts 8)
Bananas Foster Filled Crepes
Vanilla Bean Ice Cream
 
Praline Crème Brí»lée
 
White Chocolate Bread Pudding
Macadamia Nut Ice Cream
 
Nectar Cream Soda Float
 
Vieux Carré Beignets
Chicory Coffee Pot de Crème
 
plus more...

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This is a type of food that you see done badly at so many middle-of-the-road places. It almost always reads better on the menu than it tastes on the plate.

I'm excited about a place that might actually do it justice because these are flavors and combiantions that really appeal to my tastes.

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Jeff Tunks is an alum of The Grill Room at the Windsor Court Hotel in New Orleans. I have high expectations for Acadiana, especially since we won't be able to eat in New Orleans for a while :lol:

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I was just flipping through my Washingtonian mag and re-read the article on Acandia.

Jeff Tunks is reported to have planned ordering many items from Nola, such as Leidenheimer Bakery bread, and Zapp's potato chips. I know I sure as heck can tell an Ammoroso roll from others when I eat a hoagie so I thought this was a wonderful idea to go to such lengths for authenticity.

I wonder how this is impacting him and his restaurant offerings.

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I was just flipping through my Washingtonian mag and re-read the article on Acandia.

Jeff Tunks is reported to have planned ordering many items from Nola, such as Leidenheimer Bakery bread, and Zapp's potato chips. I know I sure as heck can tell an Ammoroso roll from others when I eat a hoagie so I thought this was a wonderful idea to go to such lengths for authenticity.

I wonder how this is impacting him and his restaurant offerings.

If he was planning on getting in "authentic" food from the region, he is probably out of luck for the forseeable future. There are no words for what's going on down there. The infrastructure is essentially ruined. I don't know if seafood is taken from the immediate area around NOLA, but I wouldn't eat any of it once that toxic water from the city is pumped into the Gulf. I understand that there is no choice in the matter.

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As predicted by Metrocurean and I'm sure hoped for by many, Acadiana is having a benefit for the victims of the Hurricane. And not just any benefit -- this looks fricking' awesome. What they are doing is a huge statement about the giving and collegial nature of the DC Chef community. Thank you Chef Tunks et al.

http://www.dcist.com/archives/2005/09/01/a...ns_refugees.php

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I was just flipping through my Washingtonian mag and re-read the article on Acandia.

Jeff Tunks is reported to have planned ordering many items from Nola, such as Leidenheimer Bakery bread, and Zapp's potato chips. I know I sure as heck can tell an Ammoroso roll from others when I eat a hoagie so I thought this was a wonderful idea to go to such lengths for authenticity.

I wonder how this is impacting him and his restaurant offerings.

I spoke with Chris Clime, the Chef, last week. He was excited about getting the perfect Po' boy rolls from NO. This whole situation is sad.

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I don't know if seafood is taken from the immediate area around NOLA, but I wouldn't eat any of it once that toxic water from the city is pumped into the Gulf.  I understand that there is no choice in the matter.

Louisisana used to supply 1/4 of the country's oysters. The hurricane has ruined the beds and all will have to be reseeded if possible after the polluted water is pumped out of NOLA. No gulf shrimp in the foreseeable future either.

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Louisisana used to supply 1/4 of the country's oysters.  The hurricane has ruined the beds and all will have to be reseeded if possible after the polluted water is pumped out of NOLA.  No gulf shrimp in the foreseeable future either.

Actually, we won't be able to assess the potential damage to fish or shellfish until we can get boats in the water to do some sampling. The more predictable impact is to the infrastructure -- boats, bait shops, gas shops, ice supply, and processors.

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I stopped by Acadiana last night for a few glasses of wine and a light dinner at the bar, something that might become a bit of a habit as I pass by the restaurant on my walk home. Still stuffed from the roast beef po boy at lunch, I opted for two appetizers instead of a main. At the recommendation of Zach, an affable bartender (who mentioned previous stints at Ortanique and Sette), I started with the char-broiled oysters. Six ginormous oysters, specie unknown, were broiled on the half-shell and topped with garlic butter and a blend of parmesan and romano cheese. They were served with a half-sized loaf of warm, crusty french bread, which was the perfect vessel to deliver the excess butter and cheese. The dish was straightforward and good, and with the loaf of bread could almost make a meal on its own.

I followed with the heirloom tomato salad, and sampled some of the best tomatoes of the year. The salad comprised a small serving of three or four varieties of microgreens, dressed lightly with a fragrant, sweet vinaigrette, served over four half-inch slices of tomato. The tomato could not have been better. It was plump, sweet, and juicy--and eating it on an illuminated bar proved interesting, as I could see the membranes and translucent interior of the fruit each time I lifted a bite. The salad was served with crostini that were topped with a whipped parmesan spread that, for some reason, reminded me of my mother's homeamde pimento cheese. I can see myself stopping by regularly just for this salad during the reaminder of peak tomato season.

I finished my meal by ordering the praline creme brulee. The dessert was a little too viscous, a little too egg-y for my taste. I only finished half of it but did enjoy the sugared sleeve of pecans used as a garnish. Upon seeing me push back the half-eaten dessert, the other bartender asked, knowingly, "too thick?" One of the nearby servers was in clear disagreement and claimed the creme brulee was her favorite offering on the menu.

Three glasses of 2004 Jardin Sauvignon Blanc (Stellenbosch, South Africa) and I left more than sated.

I found the space to be handsomely decorated, deceptively large, and quite comfortable. The main dining room was about two-thirds full last night, as it appeared few knew they were opening on Monday instead of Tuesday (apparently, the private party for Louisiana delegates was cancelled in the wake of Katrina).

Edited by LoganCircle

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I had dinner at Acadaina the other evening. While it is probably not fair to comment too harshly on the service given that they have only been open little while, it turned out to be impossible to get a drink from the bartender. After a 15 minutes wait (we were early for our reservation on the assumption that we would relax at the bar for a couple of minutes) we were escorted to our table sans drink in hand.

Our server was a little green as well. We ordered a bottle of wine and it seemed to take an inordinate amount of time for the bottle to arrive. When we mentioned that we would like a couple of more minutes to decide on our orders, we did not mean that we needed 10 more minutes. AT any rate, once our ordered were in, the service was pretty efficient.

I ordered the charbroiled oysters and the grilled redfish. The oysters come out on a tray with a half dozen of the bastards, drizzled with garlic butter and Parmesan cheese. They bring you a small baguette to soak up the juice. For some reason, when I think "charbroiled" I think of heat coming from the bottom. These apparently had been broiled in a salamander with heat coming from the top. Any way, they were delicious and I used about half the bread to soak up the juices. I gave the other half to another member of our party who had the baked oyster and artichoke gratin. I was the recipient of some of the gratin and it was good as well. The fellow on my right had the gumbo. It looked and smelled great but he said it was a little too spicy for his delicate palate, a good sign. The report on the trio of deviled eggs was good as well.

The grilled redfish did not live up to expectations. This entrée is served with seafood and andouille jambalaya risotto, smoked red bell pepper sauce. With those ingredients, I expected a mouthful of flavor and I was disappointed. I don't know how they managed to suck all the flavor out of this dish, but they did a good job adding a big dose of bland to it. I expected some smokiness to the red pepper sauce, nope. I expected some kick to the andouille jambalaya risotto, nope. I expected some sting to the redfish, nope. It just plain fell flat. There were some good crawdads in the risotto though.

The woman to the left of me had the duck which had to have come from some mutated monster duck species. The thing was huge, she took half of it home. She said it was very good. The guy across the table from me had the crab cakes and he said they rival the ones at Oceanaire.

On our second bottle of wine, the server seemed to want to empty it as fast as she could. I hate it when they top off a half full glass of wine. I politely asked her to put the bottle back in the ice bucket and wait until the glasses were empty.

Overall, I think the place is OK and they are probably just getting settled in. Their full menu is now available online. I'm sure I'll wind up back there sometime soon.

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A friend and I had lunch at Acadiana on Tuesday. We shared 2 appetizers: the fried green tomatoes w/spiced shrimp rémoulade and the duo of pies with buttermilk dipping sauce. We also shared the barbeque shrimp po-boy and a side of collard greens.

Overall I wasn't blown away by the food- but I enjoyed it. The biscuits that came in the bread basket with a side of pepper jelly were great -silmutaneously rich and light with a slight crunch from the butter-brushed top. The fried green tomatoes were my favorite: tangy, crunchy and not at all greasy. I was expecting a little more from the po boy - more shrimp and more flavor. Last week I was so disappointed when they ran out of shrimp po boys during the fundraiser, but now I think that the roast beef might be a better choice. Finally I thought the collard greens needed some additional kick-I appreciated the smokiness, but I think they needed vinegar.

Our service was very friendly and well-intentioned, and so I hope the glitches we experienced will work themselves out. At first, when the restaurant was relatively empty, our waiter was too attentive and tried to take away our plates before we had finished eating- but by the end of the meal he was virtually absent.

I'll definitely go back soon, though. There's no way I'm going to pass up such good biscuits so close to my office!
wub.gif

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The woman to the left of me had the duck which had to have come from some mutated monster duck species.  The thing was huge, she took half of it home. 

It's almost duck season, Jacques. Shall we hunt down the source of these behemoths, so to speak?

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It's almost duck season, Jacques.  Shall we hunt down the source of these behemoths, so to speak?

You obviously have no concept of the fine art of waterfowl hunting. One does not "hunt them down." The traditional method is one of gentle enticement under which they come to you, rather than the other way around.

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You obviously have no concept of the fine art of waterfowl hunting.  One does not "hunt them down."  The traditional method is one of gentle enticement under which they come to you, rather than the other way around.

Very well, then. You carry the gun. I'll bring the fruit sauce.

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I too had a lackluster lunch last week, but feel that it is too early to be too judgmental (although I had high hopes for a strong opening; I guess too high).

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The traditional method is one of gentle enticement under which they come to you...

Will you be demonstrating your arsenal of water fowl calls for us at the picnic, JG?

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Has anyone been to Acadiana in the last week or so? I'm thinking of going in the near future but reviews have been so-so up to this point. Perhaps I should go someplace else and wait on Acadiana for a couple of months?

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