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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/16/2021 in all areas

  1. What started as a project to put in an outdoor kitchen turned into an outdoor kitchen, new patio, replacing the deck with a three season room, and installing an outdoor fire pit area. As I said above we used BOWA and if I had to start over again, I’d make the exact same choice. Jim Harris, Mick Spring and Ethan Boudreau were a tremendous team to work with and it felt like a true partnership. Did it take longer than I’d anticipated from start to finish? Yes. But given the world we live in right now I think that’s going to be the norm for any of these types of projects. You do pay a premium for BOWA, however their work (and that of their subs - particularly the guys from Prestige on the carpentry and paint side) was impeccable and in my mind it was a premium worth paying. In the outdoor kitchen I ended up prioritizing lots of counter space and forgoing a traditional gas grill in favor of the Big Green Egg and a Gozney Dome Pizza Oven. We built in storage for pizza peels etc as well as an open space to stack wood for both ovens (as well as wood for the wood burning fireplace in the 3 seasons room).
    6 points
  2. Visited EMP for the first time since the shift to plant-based food last evening. Service remains impeccable, with a few new faces and many of the pre-Covid team still holding down the fort. I have not seen this elsewhere so I'll post current menu details below. Wines are from the standard pairing ($175pp). To provide some context, I'm not personally vegan, but I can be perfectly happy with a meal that does not feature meat and dairy. Overall I felt that the restaurant did a commendable job of preparing dishes that would not make a person miss the animal products... perhaps to a fault? There appeared to be a concerted effort to add salt and umami to dishes where one wouldn't expect, with the end result being a meal that was begging for some brightness. For example, I'm not sure how a course featuring cucumber and melon would feel heavy, but this one did. Ironically some of the naturally "meatier" courses were favored because they didn't overcompensate. To be fair, I had similar feedback after a recent experience to Longoven in Richmond, so perhaps my palate is more salt-averse than many. I also found it odd that the restaurant didn't highlight some plant-based extravagances given that duck, foie gras, and caviar are no longer served. For the price point, I would've appreciated a little shaved truffle here and there. Criticisms aside, this was an interesting meal, albeit less enjoyable than previous menus. I don't regret going, but doubt I would again with the current format. Menu from 9/16/21 Tomato tea with lemon verbena, yellow tomato dosa, salad with garlic and sancho (Bruno Dangin, Prestige de Narces, Cremant de Bourgogne, France 2018). This was one of the highlights - very simple but delicious. Celtuce in variations with rice (Tatomer, Meeresboden, Gruner Veltliner, Santa Barbara County 2018) Featured celtuce (similar to celery) sliced longer than a matchstick served in a seaweed broth. Tasty, but difficult to eat with the utensils provided. Tonburi with corn, ginger, crumpets (Girolamo Russo, Nerina, Etna Bianco, Sicily, 2019) Was the table favorite of the night and definitely intended to be the caviar replacement. Cucumber with melon and smoked daikon (Royal Tokaji, Vineyard Selection, Tokaj Hungary, 2017) My wife adores cucumber but didn't adore this dish. Monotone in texture and flavor Summer Squash with lemongrass and marinated tofu (Domane du Pelican, Ouille, Arboise, Jura France, 2019) The least successful course of the evening Sweet Pepper with swiss chard (Ca'n Verdura, Supernova, Mantonegro, Binissalem-Mallorca, 2019) A play on a popper, a deep fried pepper that came with four condiments to try. Was fantastic, but difficult to eat. I'm going to search for this wine as soon as I'm done typing this - blockbuster. Eggplant with tomato and coriander (Tronquoy-Lalande, Saint Estephe, Bordeaux France, 2008) This was beautifully presented and delicious but completely blew out the bordeaux. pictured below Beet with horseradish and herbs (Alain Graillot, Crozes-Hermitage, 2015) Had gone through three days of preparation in several different styles - looked like a wrapped filet, tasted like... a beet (albeit a very good beet). Melon smoked and fresh with yogurt. Blueberry with elderflowers (G.D. Vajra, Moscato d'Asti, Piemonte 2020) More of a custard Sesame chocolate pretzel. The bottle of brandy at the end has been replaced by vermouth served in little artsy glasses with a reference to the artist. The brandy was missed, as was the whimsy of some of the previous desserts (name that milk was a favorite)
    6 points
  3. So my daughter texted me about a new hot chicken joint in Fairfax and decided to check it out for lunch today. The name is stupid and appears to be unsettled, as the sign/website says (H)Angry Joes but some staff shirts and other collateral just says Angry Joes. At any rate, purchased three Chicken Sando's to go and was eager to get home because these things smelled fabulous. My sandwich was spectacular ($8.99) and enormous. Perfectly fried. Great bun. Delicious pickle and slaw. Also....hot as hell. Like super hot and significantly spicier than anticipated. I ordered all three "Medium" on the level of spice, as there were two options hotter and two options less spicy. I love spicy food and all three of these sandwiches were certifiably hot, and I can think of no reason to order a sandwich hotter than I received. My two dining companions were less effusive in their praise of the sandwich: Generally curmudgeonly father in-law: "Too hot....my esophagus is burned......grab me a banana and some milk.....can you wash this off?....they don't know what they are doing. You may have ordered it medium but they clearly made a mistake....glad you enjoyed yours. Mine was not an enjoyable experience. Won't be going back" 😀 Wife: "What the fuck?......I've had Nashville hot chicken. This was Chernobyl chicken.....Dad, grab me a banana.....You should have order the 'No Spice(may be spicy)' option.....I have to get on a zoom call and my eyes are watering. People are going to think I am crying" So, although the reviews were a mixed bag, ignore those fools and get this sandwich, just don't order anything hotter than medium. In Fairfax next door to the colossally over-rated and poor Duck Donuts. www.hangryjoes.com ETA: For context, Grumpy father-in-law has never complained about heat level of a single dish at Mama Chang's. Medium here is H-O-T, HOT!
    5 points
  4. Wednesday was a spicy cheese - mustard - thyme turnover from Souk; composed salad of romaine, sliced hard-boiled egg, yellow heirloom tomato, and poached salmon, with ranch dressing; and a couple slices of leftover pizza from All-Purpose. Thursday was a salad made from TJ's Cruciferous Crunch mix (shredded kale, brussels sprouts, and cabbages) plus craisins, feta and marcona almonds, with ranch dressing. We also had cauliflower cheese mixed with leftover salmon. This was a recipe from the BBC I'd recommend. I'd had 10 oz. of salmon starting out, so I poached all of it and used half in Wednesday's salad and the remainder in the cauliflower. Great use of leftover salmon, even if you're cooking it to use it as a leftover in this! Last night was more of that salad, the last of some pumpkin turkey chili that was still left, and a creation I was quite proud of. Was it good! 😋 We both loved it. I shall call it "Fruit and cheese plate au gratin": Toasted split almond croissant with spiced pears, Camembert, apricot preserves, and sliced almonds. I had been working my way through a day-end grab bag of pastries from Souk and the sugar-topped almond croissant was all by its lonesome at this point and getting stale. I figured straight reheating it was probably not going to be terribly successful and didn't want to make bread pudding. So, inspired by the concept of a cheese plate spread with nuts, fruit, and bread, I reassembled and baked it all. I cut the croissant in half lengthwise and put each half, cut side up, in a separate buttered Le Creuset gratin dish. I then layered each pastry with sliced pear that had been sautéed in butter with salt, pumpkin pie spice and splash of pear brandy; sliced Camembert; apricot preserves; sliced almonds; and a few dots of butter. It went into a 350F oven for 20-25 minutes. This tasted amazing and is a really great dish for fall too. It was a little sweet for the centerpiece of a dinner, but it was so wonderful, we didn't care.
    4 points
  5. This recipe is very similar to Alice Waters. Thanks for sharing. The weekend was busy for cooking for a bunch of guests/family that we hosted in our sukkah (outdoor eating in the backyard as part of Jewish nomadic hut appreciation week). Friday: stuffed vegetables 2.5 ways. 1) Shuk cookbook's stuffed delicata squash with tahini dressing. So good. I had non-beef eaters so we subbed in ground turkey. This recipe has raisins and pine nuts but no rice in the meat mixture so it comes together pretty fast. 2) Persian-inspired stuffed peppers - more traditional rice and ground meat (again used turkey) with tomatoey sauce but this has great persian flavors too with a saffron tomato broth (my wife loves saffron). 2.5) same #2 filling but put in hollowed kabocha squash where I cooked the kabocha the same as the delicata. So this one was a bit of a combo of the other two and still great. We also had a great green salad brought by our friends who tossed in slices of toasted bagel as croutons. Dessert was almond plum cake and chocolate/pumpkin spiced brownies (need to get the recipe from our guest who made them). Saturday: cedar plank grilled salmon with everything bagel spice, pita bread, chopped/roasted veggies for make your own salad or sabich, garlic labne, tahini dressing, roasted sweet potatos and turnips tossed in garam masala and cumin. First time doing the cedar plank method on the grill and you really do need to soak that plank thoroughly. I was putting out fires left and right. Managed with a quick shot of the squirt bottle to save the salmon which turned out delicious. Dessert was homemade s'mores ice cream which turned out great - vanilla B&J base with lots of crushed graham crackers (more pulverized) swirled in along with lots of mini-marshmallows and chocolate chips. Sunday: mac and cheese for kids and potato, kale, parmesan frittata for adults. Along with more s'mores ice cream (it's almost gone now).
    4 points
  6. Our dinner here a few weeks ago was so good we left wondering if we should move to Navy Yard to be closer to this and other restaurants in the neighborhood. The items on the menu sounded so good, we weren't able to decide what to get so we ended up doing the "sofra menu" or the chef's tasting. Out came a smaller version of the lamb meat pies, perfectly fried okra with a dollop of baba ganoush, both the smoked tomato and tuna versions of the kibbeh naya, a large pita to dip with both the sweet corn hummus and the cherry tomato goat lebne, an off menu octopus tentacle with tomatoes and tomato water, and a skewer of lamb kabob and two lamb keftas (there were also zucchini ribbons but we were so full we didn't eat them). For dessert we had some soft serve with fruit on top as well as the baklawa. Everything was fantastic and so so good I am still thinking about that dinner.
    4 points
  7. SakuSaku Flakerie has been quietly making a name for itself in Cleveland Park. SakuSaku is housed in a small store front that is part of Al Volo with access to the old Firehook Italian Garden patio. This weekend Eater DC ran an article bestowing "cult" bakery status. I ran over Sunday morning to pick up some pastries, and there was a dozen people in line and then about 15 people in line when I left (which was occurring before the Eater article). Also, this is a bit misleading because the store front in so small, they only let in one customer group at a time. I waited about 15 minutes. I have found that it is best to order a pastry that contains a filling. The plain croissant is so crispy and flakey that it practically shatters while the fillings hold it together. The chocolate plus either pistachio or almond are both excellent. This weekend we tried a pumpkin cream filled cruffin which was also excellent. SakuSaku is run by husband wife team Yuri and Jason Oberbillig.
    3 points
  8. Got out the Foreman (a grill pan would work, too), grilled thin discs of eggplant, zucchini, summer squash and tomato. Stack on a ciabatta that had some balsamic vinaigrette and then topped with a slice of mozzarella. Squish down in the Foreman for a few minutes - absolutely delicious.
    3 points
  9. I took a walk today and saw a sign on the window of the store next to Mom's Organic Market in Rockville (Nebel St. and Randolph Rd.) that said Shouk is opening a location there. Also on their website https://shouk.com/pages/location This is a nice development for me- when I worked downtown, I would go to the location on K St. Now that I'll likely be teleworking most days till I retire, I will be able to walk less than a mile for their tasty food. Besides Mom's, there's a good Mediterranean store (Asadur's Market) in that shopping ctr., a hot pot place, and across the street, Dana Bazaar (Indian and Sri Lankan groceries- they may still have moringa seedlings, the miracle tree http://www.fao.org/traditional-crops/moringa/en/). Cheers
    3 points
  10. Pete Wells just published his informative and somewhat humorous review. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/28/dining/eleven-madison-park-restaurant-review-plant-based.html I assume you are not a professional food critic, but I spotted a few similarities between your observations and Pete's. 🙂 Well done!
    3 points
  11. Maybe it was yesterday's spectacular weather on the waterfront, the al fresco dining, the wonderful company of my lovely wife, or the people-watching of (mostly) tourists, but the meal at Vola's was a really nice experience. Lady KN and I tore into 4 dozen oysters to start -- 2 dozen Chincoteague and 2 dozen James River -- and then followed with peel-and-eat shrimp for her and a lobster roll for me. All around very good eating. The oysters were shucked almost perfectly, with just a bit of shell shard on only 2 of the 48 oysters we devoured. In addition to the high quality of the oysters, plump and juicy and briny, the addition of fresh-grated horseradish next to the cocktail sauce was nice. My lobster roll was very good, with probably 6 ounces of lobster on the traditional roll, and some of the best fries I've eaten in the past year. The fries were hot out of the fryer, maybe even an air fryer, with a dusting of slightly spicy seasoning. Lady KN's shrimp were of the oxymoronish jumbo size, with a coating of spice that was nicely complementary. Old Town on a beautiful Sunday afternoon has many enjoyable sights and sounds, and we vowed to repeat the experience again in the near future before the weather takes away the pleasure of outdoor dining.
    3 points
  12. Portuguese shellfish rice, with fresh clams from Whole Foods, and a frozen seafood mixture (scallops, shrimp and calamari) from Trader Joe’s. I was really surprised at the quality of the Trader Joe’s frozen product - The seafood tasted fresh, the calamari were tender, and everything held together beautifully. Since I had out the mini processor to buzz up a shallot for the salad dressing, I also threw in a bunch of celery leaves to my basic lemon and olive oil dressing. Very nice addition and great for a simple green salad.
    3 points
  13. I've been eating at the two different Bandit Taco locations for a few years. Both have good fresh food with lots of options. They serve their tacos Mexican style topped with diced radish and scallions and do a small double corn tortilla for most. A few vary like the baja fish that has shredded cabbage and flour tortillas. They have a long list of protein/veggies to add to tacos, burritos, rice bowls, plus now quesadilla and some tortas plus a bunch of options for sides. I've mostly had the tacos. Today we had 5 different types of tacos and chips and salsa: 1. Adobo chicken which is chopped grilled chicken was a winner 2. Barbacoa was very tender and flavorful 3. Baja Fish were ok - the fried fish strip was pretty tiny and not a big flavor booster 4. Chicken Tinga - tender but bland. Better with some salsa added 5. Mushrooms (with some corn mixed in) - really bland, didn't seem like they seasoned the mushrooms at all and definitely not braised in anything flavorful. I would skip this one next time. Chips were fresh and good and rather salty (which is good/bad depending on your preference). They came with a good size amount of very fresh pico de gallo. They were even better with the complimentary salsas they give you with the tacos. 1 is a green tomatillo with mild spice and bit chunky - good flavor. 2 is a roasted tomato medium spice which I was really feelin' today. It was great with the chips and good too added to the chicken tinga. Not worth a special trip but definitely good eats if you are nearby either location.
    2 points
  14. Pasta alla Vecchia Bettola - basically your standard vodka sauce but the tomato components are roasted for 90 minutes in the oven so it develops great, concentrated flavors. Standard parmesan chicken cutlets and greens dressed with lemon vinaigrette. Different meal - Winter Minestrone with a classic grilled cheese. Hearty without being heavy.
    2 points
  15. Last night was Samin Nosrat's recipe for Buttermilk Roast Chicken from Salt Fat Acid Heat. It was a perfectly serviceable roast chicken, but given that I usually plan my meals about 4 hours in advance and this requires a 24 hour brine, I didn't think the juice was worth the squeeze. Also made her "Persianish" Saffron Rice - the Tahdig came out wonderfully, but honestly the whole dish was incredibly bland. Served with a salad of butterhead lettuce, beets, blood orange sections, walnuts and feta with an orange dijon vinaigrette and a 2018 Guigal Condrieu.
    2 points
  16. You're way ahead of this basic recipe, but I've been making pickles based on this video: I don't use pickling spice and I stopped adding crushed red pepper flakes and just use slivers of fresh hot peppers instead. They add great color and are easy to insert between the pickles. The upside (or downside) is each jar ends up with a slightly different amount of heat. But I get raves about this simple recipe.
    2 points
  17. I've been to the Navy Yard spot quite a bit lately, largely because of the welcoming and expansive outdoor space. I've been quite pleased with the visits; my wallet less so. Most recently for a friend's day-after-birthday celebration, a few of us enjoyed the Friday "happy afternoon" (12-4; half-price MD and VA oysters; drink specials) at one of the outdoor lounge tables. Service was wonderful. Our server was completely unperturbed by how long we took up a prime table and just kept bringing us what we wanted. The seafood was wonderful as always, and their fries are probably my favorite in the city. One thing I'd wanted to order and had not previously was the kampachi crudo (aguachile, avocado crema, pickled red onion, green Thai chilies, micro cilantro). It was fantastic. We split it but I somehow ended up with most of the cubed fish from the small ($17) portion, and I am going to splurge on this again. We talked about dragging some of the Parker House rolls through the spicy avocado crema but I don't know that any of us ended up doing that. The Parker House Rolls (served with housemade butter; $5) were a request of the birthday girl and we let her eat half of them🙃. As I said to my friends, if I'm paying a premium to have an amazing (and calming -- I find it so calming) water view, I want the food to be as good as it here.
    2 points
  18. I haven’t posted in a while because my meals have been so boring. But I had guests tonight, and I tried to have a nod to summer and fall. Summer was citrus shrimp salad over mixed greens with avocado and toasted almonds. Fall was sweet potato soup with ginger, onions, garlic, and garam masala.
    2 points
  19. Still making lots of pickles pretty regularly. Over the summer we grew persian cucumbers which were very bountiful. Led to lots of my usual fermented cukes with peppercorns, garlic, coriander seed and yellow mustard seed - sometimes with dill if I have it or even dill seed and also sometimes with a few chile de arbol for spicy pickles. Also made a bunch of vinegar cukes when I didn't have time to ferment - spiced them with all types of combos. Best was probably the italian mix with fresh oregano, basil, and thyme plus peppercorns. For a few others, I added cumin or fennel seeds. You really can't go wrong with whatever flavor combo you like. Homemade pickles are much tastier than mass-produced store bought. I also have continued to make lots of the pickled radishes mentioned above - sometimes with chile and sometimes without - they are always a big hit. Something new was making more pickled chili recipes as I've gotten big bunches in my CSA. Simple pickled jalapenos are easy and delicious. Also made a few fresno chiles recipes from the Joy of Pickling - chile garlic relish which is super simple you mixed brine add to food processor along with stemmed chiles and you are done. No cooking involved. You can take it a next step further and use some of the chile garlic relish along with cooking a sugar blend to make your own sweet chile garlic sauce.
    2 points
  20. Last night was turkey pumpkin chili (sort of based on this recipe) and spaghetti squash casserole, which is from an old Mollie Katzen Moosewood recipe.
    2 points
  21. Say hi next time! (The Florence Price Symphony #3 was terrific, and needs to become part of the standard 20th century symphonic canon. Plus there’s just something intrinsically riotous about an old white conductor dancing the hambone.)
    2 points
  22. 2 points
  23. La Bise is the successor to the long-running Oval Room near the White House. It is part of the Knightsbridge restaurant group owned and managed by Ashok Bajaj. The kitchen is headed by chef Tyler Stout, who has had stints in Boston’s Troquet, as well as in DC’s Macon Larder. The restaurant dubs itself as offering modern French cuisine. We sat in the right back room and the decoration with giant Paris photos made us feel as if we were almost in the French capital. The service was impeccable like in the late Oval Room. We had a good sample of appetizers and two main courses (recommended by our competent and friendly waitress). Appetizers. A cold fresh pea soup felt in the mouth like a velvety green purée, not too sweet not too savory, just right. The foie gras with verjus (“vinegar” from un-ripened grapes), hazelnut, brioche and more was delicious. The butter-poached Maine lobster was accompanied by glazed potato, celery, preserved lemon and sauce Americaine, providing a counterpoint of starchy, tangy and peppery-sweet flavors to the shellfish. Main courses. · The duck plate was a combination of duck breast and duck leg confit, the latter presented in a “cannellone” with some foie gras added (a riff on the cannelloni a la Rossini, we guess). We thoroughly enjoyed this multifaceted dish, a kind of pasta plus “secondo” course all in one. · The sea bass paired a fantastic crunchy skin outside with a moist white flesh which transported our palate to foodie heaven. The side of zucchini and mini yellow pumpkins was also very tasty and grilled to perfection. To crown it all, we chose to share the Valrhona chocolate dessert with powdery olive oil on the side and vanilla ice cream. So sinfully delicious--we can still taste it in our mouths. It is surprising that the Knightsbridge restaurant group, which includes such great establishments as the two Rasikas and Mirabelle has not been awarded any Michelin stars so far. Perhaps la Bise is Ashok Bajaj’s latest attempt to obtain the coveted Michelin star.
    2 points
  24. Crummy wine list aside, the beautiful bar is now open and has very extremely comfortable seats. We sat there on Saturday and had a lovely Angel's Envy special bottling (name is escaping me now) and really enjoyed ourselves. Almost felt like pre-pandemic times again, sitting at a bar without masks and chatting with people over a good glass of booze.
    2 points
  25. Has anyone been here recently? I just checked their website and I'm perplexed by many things. First: The regular menu has been replaced by the "choose your adventure" menu. This menu has no prices and the "adventure" is that each person gets to pick two items on the list. I suppose this is nice for a group, but what do you do if you're a single diner who wants three items or a couple who wants five? I'm sure they have a solution for that, but why leave us guessing?!?! Not only are there no prices for individual items, but there is no price for the "choose your adventure" meal which appears to be the only way to dine there now. Again, why the mystery here? Second: I was looking into to making a reservation there for three people but they don't allow it!!! You can make a reservation for one, two, four, five or six but not three. Wut? Third: In trying and failing to make a reservation for three on their Tock page, I found the price for the Choose Your Adventure meal. It's 75 bucks!! Before drinks, tax and tip!! (as far as I could tell). That's 100 bucks with just tax and tip! Probably closer to $150 if you get a drink or two. I long for the days when they advertised as being a neighborhood place where you could come in everyday (their words IIRC) and get a meal. Maybe I'm just getting old and cranky but close to $150 per person for a meal seems a lot closer to a special occasion place than neighborhood joint to grab a quick bite.
    2 points
  26. We enjoyed our 2 visits to this place(2 adults, 2 kids) as we live very close. Most of the dishes are really good maybe a couple misses. Im surprised not to see a bouillabaisse both times. When I asked the servers actually didn't know what a bouillabaisse is but hey nobody is perfect. My kids didn't like the smoked sweet corn ice cream but as a dad I finished the bowl. Dad duties :)
    2 points
  27. Monday was a Vegetable Lasagna and salad. The lasagna was great, but I'm not sure how one would cook zucchini and spinach in a baking dish for an hour and NOT have it swimming in liquid. I salted the zucchini and sweat it out, rang out the spinach, etc. That being said, it was still delicious. Served with salad. Last night was Vegetarian Enchiladas from Delish. Tasty and delicious, though in the future I'll be more careful with my choice of enchilada sauce - I used Frontera which was a salt bomb. Side of roasted pepper salad that was good but would have been better if served at room temperature rather than cold.
    2 points
  28. I switched to Sling and found some new shows on Tastemade and So Yummy! One of my favorite shows is Luke Nguyen's Railway Vietnam. Really detailed exploration of Vietnamese cuisine with recipes on the website. A show I don't like so much is Food Ranger - Trevor James. He started as a YouTuber, has limited vocabulary, stuffs too much food into his mouth, and makes annoying exaggerated expressions. He does explore interesting street food but I can't stand to watch him. A funny food related YouTube show is Uncle Roger. He makes fun of other people's cooking.
    2 points
  29. Since my last post in this forum 6 years ago, I have made ALOT of pickles. Currently, I am fermenting 4 different flavors of cucumbers and working on 2 batches of sauerkraut. I still like my base spice blend for cukes of 2-3 smashed cloves of garlic, eyeball about a tablespoon or so of mustard seeds and same of coriander seeds, and a good pinch of black peppercorns. That is pretty good on its own but I also add fresh dill and dill seeds or sometimes fennel seeds are nice too. If I want them spicy I had 1-2 dried chili de arbol. I've also had success with adding fresh thyme and rosemary. I usually ferment these using basic salt water fermentation in wide mouth, quart ball jars with cheap but great fermenting airlocks that regulate the airflow so you don't have to worry ($20 or less for several on amazon). I then leave them out on my counter for about 2 weeks to get a nice full sour and then they keep in the fridge for a year or so. Easiest and most delicious way to have cucumber pickles. For the sauerkraut, this is my first time as I got a huge cabbage in my CSA so figured I'd take the plunge. Both are fermenting nicely after about 2 1/2 weeks - I think they are almost done as the shredded cabbage is becoming more translucent. I made one batch with a bunch of using a traditional German recipe where I added a caraway seeds since I didn't have juniper berries at the time. (Now I do - thank you Spice House). The other batch is kind of like Kimchi - I found this spicy turkish pickle recipe in my pickling bible - the Joy of Pickling by Linda Ziedrich - HIGHLY RECOMMEND for its many great tips, troubleshooting, and many many recipes for all kinds of pickles (fresh, vinegar, fermented, soy, miso, etc,) with lots of different types of food. This turkish sauerkraut had a pretty cooked brine and lots of chili flakes added. So far it tastes great. My one quibble with the Joy of Pickling is that you need to adjust the scale a bunch for the recipe as the author designs some of them for large gallon crocks. I haven't done crocks yet because instead of having 1 huge batch of the same pickle, I like a bunch of varieties - hence my use of quart jars or pint jars. Other of my favorite pickles are David Lebovitz's quick vinegar pickled radishes. These are so easy and so delicious. If you seek any small radishes at the farmer's market or even regular store buy a pint and make these today. They are ready the next day and everyone loves them. I've used the same brine on shredded purple cabbage too which is also good. I also like most, but not all the recipes from this preserving book - Put 'Em Up by Sherri Brooks Vinton. If I remember correctly this is where i got a great recipe for pickled beets in vinegar with cloves. I also pickled some rhubarb. Can you tell I joined a CSA this year? 😉 It gets rather stinky but who doesn't love Vietnamese pickled daikon radish and carrots - there a lot of online recipes and super easy to make. Great for adding to salads or making homemade bahn mi. Since you need to slice the veggies thin, it takes a bit longer in prep but worth the effort. I have also tried and failed at making miso pickles and never really like my soy pickles but I think that is just personal taste. I also tried making cukes with prepared horseradish but the results weren't great. Anyone else have good recipes to share?
    2 points
  30. Try this recipe instead for Persian Rice. https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/jeweled-rice-with-dried-fruit-230991 The spiced butter tahdig and lots of dried fruit make it very flavorful. I usually make this early and then let it sits for a few hours before I flip it for a perfect tahdig, but they have a method for quick release. Of course getting the tahdig perfect matters less with all of the jewels of dried fruit inside too. You can also add whatever spices you like to the butter for more/less or different flavors. It is very customizable - I do love cardamon though and so usually use that per the recipe.
    1 point
  31. Hello! Just making some updates to the Really Good Coffee map... -Really Good: Cameo (promoted), Ceremony Bethesda, For Five Alexandria & Arlington, Sweet Science (Arlington) -Closed: Blüprint, Java Shack (see Sweet Science), Little Pear (closed for coffee) -Watch: Artifact (Baltimore), Grape & Bean (meh? coffee program?), Misha's (Old Town Waterfront) If anyone knows of listed places that are closed, please post here.
    1 point
  32. Acting on a tip from a local, I swung by Zuppardi's in West Haven on a drive back from RI in June. The clam pie was spectacular. Pro-tip: The cannolis are also outstanding.
    1 point
  33. That Pappardelle should be in the DC Dining Hall of Fame. So good way back when at Tosca, great in its short stint at Posto, and still great now at San Lorenzo.
    1 point
  34. They're taking over the (cursed) restaurant space at 3rd and Massachusetts, NE, last occupied by Romeo and Juliet. Per Hill Rag. The only place that's been there that I thought was halfway decent was the Thai one 30ish years ago, but I have high hopes for this.
    1 point
  35. Mirabelle is indeed gone, fully boarded up and looking like it will be branded as something different. We went to La Bise and we were pleased if not bowled over by the fare. It was step up from Brasserie Liberte, but what we had is not going to earn them a Michelin star. 75 mph, straight down the middle French food delivered with excellent service, which seems to be a hallmark of Ashok's restaurants.
    1 point
  36. Tazza Cafe has set up in the old Campono space. I have not been but they seem to be following the Campono format with some changes. You could also visit Victura Park Wine Garden and Café at the REACH on the other side of the Kennedy Center.
    1 point
  37. "Beets aren’t very good at pretending to be meat, but their ability to taste like beets is unrivaled." Pretty much sums up his review. Thanks for posting
    1 point
  38. I will say that after watching Ted Lasso - I get it now.
    1 point
  39. My husband has been away twice, once for nearly a month, and there have been a lot of Nats games, so the menus have been erratic. I've also gotten terrible at keeping track of them. We've had salmon chowder (wild salmon from Costco) and half smokes from Stachowski's on whole wheat hot dog buns through several iterations, plus burritos and nachos with roasted Hatch chilies (Whole Foods). I've made several recipes from half baked harvest, which is a site I think I first saw mentioned here. This recipe with spicy chicken meatballs (I use 1 lb. chicken and 1/2 lb. pork) is one I've made several times. It uses some of my fresh oregano, which is great, and I just saute whatever vegetables I use. We just finished some great tortellini in brodo with baby spinach and Parmesan that I made with stock from a Costco rotisserie chicken carcass and cheese tortellini from Canales in Eastern Market. I made this last night, along with yukon gold mashed potatoes, and kale with apple cider vinegar and red pepper flakes. Somewhere in here I made Hatch chile mac and cheese with radish greens, which we're still working on, and I pulled buttermilk rolls from June of last year out of the freezer that we've been working our way through. They held up very well. Tonight is spare ribs (from Harvey's at Union Market) with my own spice rub plus some Laphroaig for extra smokiness. We're also having another half-baked harvest recipe for butternut squash and cheese stuffed pasta shells. We'll finish off the last couple rolls too, and I'm putting together some kind of salad.
    1 point
  40. A friend randomly sent me a Cuisinart ice cream machine when I was pregnant in 2013 and I used it a couple of time, but then, well, I had a newborn/infant/toddler and the thing sat dormant in a cupboard for many years. I resuscitated it this summer and made a simple strawberry ice cream and then a chocolate mint ice cream with steeped mint leaves from our backyard. Both were quite tasty despite the fact I used half and half in place of heavy cream in both recipes. I came into some peanut butter powder this summer and our basil plants are quite prolific, so I might try peanut butter and (separately) basil ice cream based on posts above. Thanks for the ideas!!
    1 point
  41. They have opened a branch in the north end of Old Town on Montgomery Street and N. Washington, a couple of blocks north of the Trader Joe's. Had dinner there last night. It has a bright boho-Modern decor, and there's a dessert shop called Magnolia's tucked inside. Tables are well spaced and there's an uncovered patio for dining outside when the weather cooperates. Didn't stray from the basics. Rice paper veggie rolls with garlic dipping sauce were fresh with a little heat and very assertive Thai basil and the rice paper wasn't overly rubbery/sticky. I got the chicken penang curry and my dining companion had the crispy duck curry, both were served in attractive handled brass bowls on a small stand that probably was supposed to have a tea light candle to keep the curry warm, but wasn't utilized that way. Rice came on the side, maybe a generous 1/2 cup serving each. The chili peppers were cut fairly large so you could avoid them if you wanted. The sauce was very nicely balanced and fairly mild heat -- I could actually have had it amped up a bit -- and the chicken and veggies were properly cooked. I think $16 for the chicken and maybe $18 for the duck. Seemed reasonable for the portions and the quality. There were some other interesting things on the menu under the street food section that I'll try another time.
    1 point
  42. It's been a mix of cooking and repurposing here this week. Went to the Nats game on Sunday, so simple that night - Italian Wedding soup from the freezer with grilled cheese sandwiches. (Harvest grain bread and Jersey Gold Cheese from Spring Gap. Note the website there is VERY out of date. They are only at SS and Mt P farm markets these days.) Monday was stir fry night - chicken, broccoli, peppers, peanuts. Also, salad (not stir fried). Tuesday we reaped the benefits of the grilling night, with chicken taquitos. Lots of guacamole. Also, salad. And tonight was a kind of modified sate. The only difference from the recipe - didn't skewer it. Cooked in the grill pan and served over brown rice with shredded Thai basil. Also, salad.
    1 point
  43. Enjoyed a great dinner at the Penn Quarter branch this past Saturday night. There we 10 of us and my nephew ordered enough dishes to put us into submission. Half the table were picky eaters and they were happy with a cheese plate, eggplant, anchovies and tomatoes. My side of the table had that as well shrimp, Octopus, Jamon and meatballs. And we all had plenty of Potatoes Bravas. Solid meal and worth the drive in from Annapolis.
    1 point
  44. Much has happened since my last entry. Crimson developed struvite stones in his bladder and there was inappropriate everything, often on treasured objects. He had also ate something that stuffed his colon up. This was in April. Off to the hospital, and he had to get opened up and the stones scooped out of his little bladder. I am so glad I have insurance on my 2 oranges. He had the runs recently, and the vets are too backed up for personal visits, so they were kind enough to tell me he has an inflammation from his issues (he has to eat special food now to increase the acidity of his urine). So they gave me Metronidazole caps. After a couple of days, he has learned to detect it and I can put it in his mouth and he'll leave the room and drop it on the floor while laughing at me. Pill pockets? He'll eat around the pill and leave it on the floor and say "Thanks for the snack!". I will emply the Pill Popper now, as he can also pick the pill out of his wet food, and he can also tell if I've slit open the capsule and mixed the powder in. "Hey, there's something in here! I'm not eating this!" They have amazing senses. Aengus is doing well.
    1 point
  45. This is a problem I ran into with corporate places. I worked at a place that had "partnerships" with Gallo, Terlato and Kobrand. This obligated us to give their products 1/3 of the list. This leaves out the small, family owned wineries that I prefer to utilize. Gallo and Constellation dominate the supermarket category. Ever wonder why you see La Marca Prosecco everywhere? Gallo. Kim Crawford? Constellation.
    1 point
  46. Theirs was not always the best in the area, but it was good enough (for someone with the eponymous screen name). The Lebanese cuisine in this area is credible, compared to most metropolitan areas not named New York, Los Angeles, or Detroit/Dearborn. Our selection of Mama Ayesha's, Lebanese Taverna, Me Jana, Mediterranean Bakery, Mediterranean Gourmet Market, Albi's in the Navy Yard, among a few others, is an abundance of goodness.
    1 point
  47. Oh, I haven't been here in a while. Here and Zenebech are my two favorites these days. They make very nice kitfo.
    1 point
  48. Returned to Corduroy last night for the first time in many years and it felt like a big welcome home hug. I have loved Corduroy since its Four Points days and I will always associate it with the Don Rockwell community. The care and attention that Chef Power puts into his food is always reflected in the warmth of the amazing front of house. We were celebrating my birthday last night and I brought my kids there for the first time so it felt extra special. We revisited old favorites like the seared tuna, and soft shell crabs, but were also introduced to exciting new dishes like the tonakatsu, and the incredible chilled avgolemono soup (I can't go to Corduroy and not order soup). The outdoor space is lovely and the mural Chef's wife painted sets such a joyful mood back there. Even with all the amazing new restaurants in DC, I knew I wanted to support Corduroy on my birthday. We loved every minute of our experience there.
    1 point
  49. To Don Rocks, whose 61st trip around the sun began early this morning watching shooting stars from a balcony with me. My shooting star—the sweetest man I know—deserves nothing less than a meteor shower in his honor! Cheers to you and our year ahead!
    1 point
  50. Last time I was at Rosenfeld's (OC location), I was given par-boiled bagels with some instructions for finishing in the oven the next morning. That was the way to go. Rosenfeld's is just generally awesome, sorta can't go wrong there.
    1 point
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