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We watched the documentary "New Chefs on the Block" last night. Frank Linn and Aaron Silverman  are the "new chefs" of the title. The film chronicles the build out of Frankly Pizza and Rose's Luxury (and to a lesser extent, P&P). It's a pretty fascinating film. The coverage starts in 2013 and goes through 2016. The film came out this year. I was unaware of it until I saw it pop up on Amazon Prime when we were looking for something to watch last night.

It was interesting to see the roles both sets of parents played in getting the restaurants off the ground. Also fascinating: the projected expenses for opening vs. actual. Rose's budget was much bigger, but as a percentage they went over much less than Frankly (which was working with an existing restaurant space). The way each handled staffing was also interesting to see.

Since there was quite a gap between when work on the film began and when it was wrapped up, there were some interview bits that otherwise wouldn't have been jarring but were. The most bittersweet part of the film was the segments featuring Michel Richard (who gets an "in memoriam" at the end) talking about food and restaurants. Then there were the segments with Mike Isabella talking about running restaurants. Oh my.

In any case, I haven't been to Kensington in years, but it was cool to see the evolution of Rose's, a restaurant I've been too quite a number of times.
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Any recent thoughts, especially in light of the Xi'an opening?  We haven't been in quite a while and were wondering about overall quality, anything specifically better/not quite as good, etc. 
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We had two proteins tonight. One was a salad I improvised using halibut.
The other was a Mark Bittman recipe for deviled chicken thighs, which I made cautiously, as it involved cooking skin-on chicken under the broiler. Served with dill mashed potatoes and the salad.
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A new season has started on Top Chef.  They're centered in Louisville KY for this season and we have a local chef to root for, Eric Adejpong, who formerly worked at Kith/Kin but now owns a catering company.  He's made it through the first round.
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I stopped by the One Loudoun location for lunch today. Since I was solo, I tried two menu items. I should have taken pictures, but I realized that after I had already eaten most of the food. 😎

The lobster taquitos ($6.50)  consisted of flour tortillas filled with a pleasantly rich, nicely seasoned lobster mixture, and then drizzled with a spicy sauce and served with a dollop of guacamole and and vegetable garnish. The taquitos were fried perfectly, and the serving size was larger than I expected. I'd easily order them again.

I ordered the single portion of fish and chips ($9 for single, $13 for double, grilled or fried). The fish used was Hoki, which I've probably eaten before, but never intentionally. It turns out that Hoki, a white fish, is one of the types of fish used in a Filet-O-Fish. I digress. The portion was ample, nicely breaded, and perfectly cooked. The fish was served with a serving of fries, house-made tartar sauce, and a pickle. Again, very satisfying.

While I only tried two menu items, I like the fact that the restaurant offers seafood prepared a number of ways. Ford's Fish Shack, which some see as a competitor, offers a menu that centers around fried fish/seafood. Slapfish offers plenty of fried foods and chowder, but it also offers Poke bowls, salads, and ceviche. Ford's is a full service restaurant/bar, while Slapfish is a fast casual spot.

The staff was extremely welcoming and helpful. I look forward to a return visit. 
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Had such a delightful time at Katz last Sunday morning. Going on a Sunday at 930am has several advantages. It is not crowded, the owner was hosting his grandkids and family to an elaborate deli spread in the back (yes breakfast like pancakes but also hot dogs), and it is never not a good time for their pastrami. The pastrami half sandwich was ample and so delicious. Their rye bread is only ok (I miss the double baked from DGS) but that meat, oh that meat. It is perfectly cooked - nice chew, but delicate, not falling apart, sliced in front of you to not too thick and not too thin, with great bark and so much flavor. The matzo ball soup was good - soup was pretty good packed with carrots and a nice huge soft matzo ball. The pickles were hit and miss. The sours were good but not great and the half sours were awful - salty cucumbers, I wouldn't even call them pickles. (now I'm biased against half-sours but these were not good). The potato knish's filling was rather good - lots of good sweet onion flavor but not too sweet but the dough was almost non-existent. It was super thin and basically a shell to hold the filling in one place. Kids loved the good bagels and cream cheese and the super friendly bagel guy to made them chocolate milk taking time to mix it all by hand. The countermen were also super friendly.  We got some black and white cookies to go which were rather good. 
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I thought I posted something similar elsewhere on the site. Maybe Don can find it. Here is my hummus making advice after making a lot over many years and eating it in the Mideast and all over the place in the US.  The difference between store bought and home made is the freshness and creaminess and the ability to adjust it to your taste.
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Took the kids to Joe's for lunch after their tour of the White House.  We've visited quite a few mansions recently and the White House is quite small in comparison.  The estimated tour time of 45 minutes was mostly spent in the security line.  

So I ordered the 2 course lunch with stone crab claws, hash browns, cole slaw, and key lime pie.  We also ordered some fried calamaris and fried shrimp.

When I did the 2 course lunch in Vegas, I was given a huge plate of hash browns, not so at the DC location - just a small scoop of seared potatoes.  The cole slaw is made tableside with cabbage, relish and mayo.  The seafood were great though.  The key lime pie had a very thick graham cracker crust.   

Brunch happy hour included half price champagne.
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It seems that they have closed/are closing. I'm not sure why, but I shall miss them.

We were there for happy hour on Friday, and heard from some staff that Saturday would be their last day.

No confirmation from management, or elsewhere yet.
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We had an epic meal at Bad Saint over the weekend.  Four of us went through pretty much the entire menu.  Needless to say we left stuffed.  I can honestly say there were no "low lights" nor "mid lights"...it was all high lights.  Lots of intense flavors, some good funk, and a couple dish brought the heat.  The staff was lovely, the decor beautiful, and although seating is rather cramped/tight, the wonderful food more than makes up for it.
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We were there for dinner on Saturday - 2 of the 4 of us had birthdays this week, and we celebrated. The food was great. The service (the upstairs bar, with bartender Zach, who we love) was great. And the cider was as good as always.
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Confirmed (with response from ownership): Ruta del Vino has permanently closed.

It seems that they have closed/are closing. I'm not sure why, but I shall miss them.

We were there for happy hour on Friday, and heard from some staff that Saturday would be their last day.

No confirmation from management, or elsewhere yet.
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As a tribute:
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Late lunch here was very enjoyable, though I was less impressed with the pizza than I thought I would be. The Pane bianco was otherworldly--almost like a crispy olive oil French toast, four perfectly toasted thick slices served piping hot. And only $4. The rucola/funghi/piave salad was a tower of fresh arugula layered with the mushrooms and cheese, with a nicely balanced lemon dressing. Really perfect. The meatball/mozzarella di bufala/chilies pizza was good--the crust was really beautifully crispy and chewy, as advertised. The sauce was a bit too much, and maybe the entire pizza a bit too much. Having been at 2 Amys last week before coming to Mozza, both are really outstanding but we are so lucky to have 2 Amys back in business.

A nicely curated beer list was satisfactory. I'd come back here anytime--the pizza menu is interesting and extensive--but next time I'd be very tempted to just put in a few orders of that bread--it really was that good.
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I've eaten a bagel or bialy for breakfast the great majority of days since the mid-80's. Thousands of 'em. For many years I frequented Bethesda Bagels on Bethesda Avenue, and when we lived on River Road, very close to Western Avenue, I switched alliances to Georgetown Bagel by the River Road Whole Foods. Both of them make a good bagel and a decent bialy. In 2011 we moved close to East West Highway @ Beach Drive, so Goldberg's Bagels on Georgia Avenue is my new place. Excellent, if somewhat inconsistently rolled bagels, and really good bialys. Their parking lot is an utter shit-show, the service is average to abysmal, and the coffee has improved from wretched to better than muffler shop waiting room coffee. They're closed Saturdays, as well as all the Jewish holidays you've ever heard of, and a bunch more. 

But the bialys, and the bagels haunt me. 

(I buy dozens and freeze them in Washington Post bags. 45 second defrost in the microwave, toast to just the tiniest hint of brown. Add Philly, Euro butter, or a quick lox or olive spread and a pot of Mayorga, and you're eating my daily recipe for making morning tolerable)
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Drink Law Brings To-Go Cocktails to a Leesburg Mall, by Tierney Plumb, November 8, 2018, on dc.eater.com.  Time to get shopping!
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It was good to be back at the bar at 2 Amy's.  It was somewhat quieter last night, perhaps people were suffering from election hangovers?
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Some highlights from a recent trip to San Antonio, in chronological order:
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Really mixed though overall underwhelming restaurant IMHO, and I think overpriced.  For starters, the rice in the maki rolls was poorly done; for $12 - $14 a roll and for the caliber of restaurant they want to be, they need to do better.  The grilled octopus app was good, tender, and shareable (and with some tasty potatoes), all a good thing at $24.  The cioppino on their online menu shows $32, but if I recall, it was quite a bit more than that.  The clams and mussels in the dish were well prepared, and the langoustine was a nice touch (though not particularly meaty).  The halibut in the dish, unfortunately, was  overcooked.  And I don't at all get the oversized croutons in the dish that are virtually impossible to eat; they are too large to eat in one bite, but can't be cut and are so big that they don't even soften up in any reasonable period of time.  Made me wonder whether the chef or anyone at the restaurant had ever tried eating it, because it wasn't even a close call that it didn't make sense.  (You can see a photo of the dish, with the offending croutons, on the Washingtonian article on the restaurant from August.)  The service was pleasant enough, but not polished.  The space is huge, and was mostly empty when we were there.  I always root for new, good dining options in Georgetown.  But I'm a bit skeptical this one makes it for long.  
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The problem is you ordered a soup that is Bun Rieu in name only. Bun Rieu is a crab soup with crab broth. The problem is no Vietnamese restaurants in anywhere all over the US offered Bun Rieu the way it's supposed to be made. What they do instead if making up this weird combo of pork broth and MSG laden crab paste from Thailand and doused it with tomato paste to balance it out.  It's like making bun mam broth and call it Pho.  Sea substitute for land vs land substitute for sea. My suggestion: If the bun rieu costs less than $15, it's not bun rieu. It might seem expensive but then how much would a crab cake served with a side of crab broth, noodles and veggies, herbs should cost?

Authentic Bun rieu also must be served with Vietnamese Balm (kinh gioi). The crab broth and Vietnamese Balm go together beautifully. That's the essence of Vietnamese cuisine. Certain herbs must go together with certain dish. 
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This thread needs some updating 

closed  zpizza, mango mikes, fudruckers

new:
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The Dabney continues to impress, with its lovely decor, roaring hearth, and delicious food.
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I'll have to disagree, Don. It's ten times better than it looks! 🙂

 
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From lunch today, I was excited to order the Edamame Falafel (6) served with Baba Ganoush, Radish and now served with a side of Bing.  I requested to replace the cucumbers with Sunflower Hozon.  When served, as you can see in the first and second photos, there were 5 tiny Edamame Falafel, fried black on the outside and dry inside.  The 2 smaller pieces were one Falafel cut into 2 pieces.  For comparison, the third photo is from my lunch I posted previously.  When I pointed it out to the manager, she was kind enough to ask if I wanted the kitchen to prepare the dish correctly.  I declined and she removed it from my bill.  I left to get lunch elsewhere.
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