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  1. *** SPOILERS FOLLOW *** Sometime in the late 1960s, we were visiting my Aunt Kitty and Uncle Ben in Detroit, and were out for a walk. We walked past a park, and Uncle Ben (who knew I was a baseball savant) asked me to guess who the park was named after - I immediately said "Ty Cobb,: and he (in his 70s at the time) said, "No, no, no! Ty Cobb wasn't loved here in Detroit - this park is named for Harry Heilmann!" (With his accent, I thought he had said "Harry Hahmann," and I never got the name right for the next twenty years). Uncle Ben had lived in Detroit for decades, and remembered
  2. I wasn't sure what to think about "Cobb" going into it: It was a box office flop, that was mildly acclaimed by critics, which is generally right up my alley; in this case, I think I knew *too* much about baseball to enjoy it as a "regular" film critic would - it was just not a good film. The film focuses on Ty Cobb's final year of life, during which a famous sportswriter (Al Stump) is writing a biography of him. After the film, I still don't know what to believe about Cobb: Was he *that* much of a hateful man, or was this overplayed? I don't know, but if this story was true, then Cobb was
  3. Saying "Alexander Cartwright invented baseball" is a little like saying "Christopher Columbus discovered America." Well, it isn't *that* bad, but there were precedents before Cartwright codified the "Knickerbocker Rules" in 1845. I grew up believing it was Abner Doubleday at Cooperstown, NY, in 1839, but that has been largely debunked. This particular thread is for discussion about the game in general - rules, various leagues around the world, etc., and probably won't get much play since most discussion is more specific, but it's here if anyone needs it.
  4. The Keys. Boy you can sit close. Highest priced seating about $15. Of course you can also go up to the club for the finest dining available at the Keys stadium courtesy of those well known providers of the most exquisite dining experiences in the region: Mattress Discounters!!! Lotta hot dogs at Keys stadium (I forget the real name), unless you opt for the mattress discounter cuisine prepared by your chef..............................uh...I didn't get his/her name. I like minor league ball!!!!!! You are so close and its so relaxed.
  5. Oh my, Yogi Berra, an all-time great catcher in the big leagues, and an all-American icon for his many quotes and advertisements that featured him. Seeing comments here referencing that .... really depressed me. Yogi is an iconic American sports star, a beloved character, and what hit hardest on a personal level, was that Yogi has lived most of his life since he got to the Yankees in a Northern NJ town, near where I grew up. There was a fair bit of news about Yogi in my neck of the woods, and all of it was positive and beloved. Yogi's achievements in baseball are legendary and for
  6. I was just introduced to the Bases Fallacy, and it took me all of five seconds to say, out loud in a room all by myself, "This is bullshit." The central concept of the "Bases Fallacy" is that certain statistics (let's use Tom Boswell's "Total Average" as an example) are fallacious because (and I'll quote directly from baseballreference.com) - "Unfortunately, players are not trying to accumulate bases. The point of baseball is to score runs, not gather bases." which, itself, is a fallacy: If you read the Bases Fallacy link, it implies that "Total Average" assumes "bases" is
  7. Brooks Robinson plays Ding Dong Ditch: Nov 27, 2012 - "Marvin Miller Spoke Truth to Power, Changed Sports Forever" by Thomas Boswell on washingtonpost.com
  8. Eddie Gaedal is one of the few players in MLB history with a 1.000 OBP, having walked in his only major-league at-bat. A slash line of .300/.400/.500 (Batting Average / On-Base Percentage (OBP) / Slugging Percentage) represents a superb season; an OPS (On-Base Percentage + Slugging Percentage) of 1.000 represents a Hall of Fame-caliber season. Gaedal had both an OBP of 1.000, and an OPS of 1.000, both Hall of Fame-level numbers, had he been able to maintain them for a career. He also holds (or shares) the all-time Walks / Appearances mark of 1.000, and I believe him to be a legi
  9. In case you ever get the urge: Aug 29, 2014 - "Best Batting Cages in the Washington, DC Area" by Folashade Oyegbola on washington.cbslocal.com Closer to home for you, there's also one in Upton Hill Regional Park on Wilson Blvd.
  10. I was getting ready to make an argument that Len Barker pitched the single-greatest game in Major League history: On May 15, 1981, Barker pitched a Perfect Game - one of 23 in Major League history; one of 21 since the "modern era" of 1900. So what made me think Barker's was *The* Greatest ever pitched? Two things - two *huge* things: 1) Not once did a batter have more than 2 Balls in the pitching count. Think about that - not once! 2) All 10 of Barker's strikeouts were swinging strikeouts! Holy hell! But there's a problem with deifying Barker's game: * Don La
  11. ESPN SportsCentury Documentary on Stan "The Man" Musial - the legendary hitter from "way out west" in St. Louis - perennially underrated due to his distal locale, but beloved by connoisseurs of the game as one of the all-time greats. Stan Musial: superstar, role model. In case anyone notices the discrepancy between the duration of Musial's Career (22 years) and that he's a 24-time All-Star, it's because from 1959-1962, MLB played two All-Star Games a year. "Stan Musial is geographically challenged - had he played his career in New York, we would have called him Lou Gehrig."
  12. Carl Hubbell! I know his name well, and have never once seen a film clip of him - famous for his screwball. His 1933-1937 seasons were extraordinary (note also in that link the #1 pitcher in "Similarity" to Hubbell). I vaguely recall "hearing" (and I mean, I can still hear it in my mind) in a documentary, an extremely gravelly voiced, older man saying "Carl Hubbell" when talking about the best pitchers ever - was that Red Barber in the Burns video? From Wikipedia, it says he set the major league record for consecutive wins with 24, and reminds us that he struck out Ruth, Gehrig, Foxx, Sim
  13. Baseball Bugs! This is the episode where Bugs turns to the camera and says, "Watch me paste this pathetic palooka with a powerful, paralyzing, poifect, pachydoimous, percussion pitch." Full cartoon, streaming on dailymotion.com Take note of Carl W. Stalling's screamer (*) right after the opening theme is finished (it starts just after the 0:15 mark, and lasts only 12 seconds). This man wrote one complete score every week for twenty-two years! That is Thomas Kinkade-like in its consistency and longevity. Stalling should be better-known than he currently is. The great thing a
  14. It about kills me to put this video up here, but the one person in the world I'll do it for is the great Roberto Clemente, killed in an airplane crash while making a humanitarian visit to earthquake victims in Nicaragua. He was 38 years old, and was still arguably the best right fielder in baseball at the time - it's hard to believe he was a year *older* than Frank Robinson, a pretty darned good right fielder himself, and whom you can see scoring the winning run here, the game before, off a Brooks Robinson sacrifice "fly" (if you want to call that a fly). This video is Clemente's second W
  15. Don, feel feee to delete if this isn’t appropriate, but we are looking for partners interested in splitting a share of 2 season tickets to the Nats in an established pool. 2 members had to drop out, leaving 2 openings. Right now we have 2 quarter share options available (can be combined into a 1/2 share too) in an established pool. 22 games. The cost of a quarter share is approximately $3200 for two seats and includes great perks like dedicated security/entry line, first dibs on post season games, and points that can be used toward parking and stuff. Awesome seats in section 213 row G seat
  16. Would someone who knows more than I do please explain how Curt Flood fit in to challengng the reserve clause, vis-a-vis Dave McNally and Andy Messersmith contributing to the same thing a few-years later? Even just pointing to an informative article would be very helpful - I've never quite understood the background (which, apparently, had existed since the 1800s), the pioneers and what they did, and the aftermath with free agency. Also, how is the reserve clause any different (in theory or principle) than designating someone as a franchise player in the NFL?
  17. Skip directly to Part 1 Bottom of the 9th In the Preambulum, I made a bold proclamation: I said I was going to all-but prove to you that Brooks Robinson was the greatest defensive player ever to play baseball, at any position. My attempt to do so was to use the 1970 World Series - the thing that everyone remembers - to demonstrate just how great Robinson was. As of right now, a certain percentage of readers probably think I did a pretty decent job, while another group probably thinks I didn't prove anything - okay, the guy had a great World Series ... so what? That doe
  18. Skip directly to Part 1 Game 5 Announcing Game 5 - and this video is in color! - with thanks to YouTube user MLBClassics - again in Memorial Stadium, are Gowdy and Kubek from NBC, along with Thompson from the Orioles. Tony Kubek interviews Cincinnati Reds' manager, Sparky Anderson. Video of the interview. Tony Kubek interviews Baltimore Orioles' manager, Earl Weaver. Video of the interview. "And the rockets' red glare ..." - The 1st Army Band from Fort George G. Meade, MD: "Brooks Robinson at 3rd ... " Top of the 1st, no score, 2 out, runner
  19. Skip directly to Part 1 Game 3 The Orioles are carrying a 16-game winning streak into Game 3: They won their final 11 regular-season games, swept the Twins in 3 games in the ALCS, and have won the first 2 games against the Reds. Announcing Game 3, now in Memorial Stadium, will be Gowdy and Kubek from NBC, along with Orioles' broadcaster Chuck Thompson. Tony Kubek interviews the legendary Sandy Koufax, who astutely points out that the Reds haven't tested catcher Elrod Hendricks, who is coming off of a broken finger and is having trouble throwing - he also advises p
  20. Skip directly to Part 1 Game Two During the introduction, after Gowdy's analysis of the crazy play at home plate in Game one, Reds announcer McIntyre gave his analysis of the game: McIntyre: "Yesterday for the Baltimore Orioles, the offensive star, and the defensive star, had to be third baseman Brooks Robinson. Leading off the 6th inning for the Cincinnati Reds was first baseman Lee May, who had earlier hit a home run and a single, and look at the play Robinson makes on this hard smash to third base. Deep behind the bag, crossing the foul line, a backhanded stop, up
  21. Skip directly to Part 1 Game One Although this World Series between the Baltimore Orioles and Cincinnati's legendary "Big Red Machine" presented Robinson with a barrage of difficult Chances (Putouts + Assists + Errors), it was a mere microcosm of his entire career. Instead of having the opportunity to make "one amazing play per game" (which is what seemed to happen in this Series), he would normally have the opportunity to make "one amazing play every few games," but he made them - almost every time - for 16 (if not 23) years, and tens-of-thousands of Orioles fans, though excited abo
  22. Preambulum It was Aristotle who said: "Tell them what you're going to tell them, tell them, and tell them what you just told them." I am going to all-but prove to you that Brooks Robinson was the greatest defensive player ever to play baseball, at any position. Robinson, who played 3rd base for the Baltimore Orioles from 1955-1977, was the Gold Glove winner for 16 consecutive years (1960-1975), and is not only the greatest defensive 3rd-baseman in history, he's the greatest defensive player of all-time, at any position. At this point, you are fully justified in believing that tr
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