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Found 6 results

  1. Q: Who is San Diego State's all-time Assists leader? A: Tony Gwynn
  2. This graphic showing ESPN's Top 10 High School Senior basketball rankings is pretty scary, if you don't pull for Duke:
  3. Please don't remember John Glenn only for his partisan politics - the man was, is, and always will be a great American Hero - just look at those tags in this thread, and there could have been more. I have total respect for this great American, and I hope everyone else does, too. Senator Glenn left us earlier today at the age of 95 - we lost a giant today: What a great man.
  4. Mary Scott was an actress who appeared in four "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" episodes, and that's good enough for me. Ms. Scott was married to Sir Cedric Hardwicke (who played in "Rope"), but after seeing her for the fourth episode in AHP, I decided that no matter what else she did with her career, she deserved her own thread, and I hope someone else chimes in with some of her other work. Scott published a memoir entitled, "Nobody Ever Accused Me Of Being A Lady," but with her mildly Audrey Hepburn-like screen presence, I'm accusing her right now. The four Alfred Hitchcock Presents episodes she played a key role in are: S02 E13: "Mr. Blanchard's Secret" as Babs Fenton, a spirited housewife cock-sure that her next-door neighbor is involved in some terrible skullduggery: S02 E15: "Crackpot" as Meg Loomis, a newlywed haunted by a seemingly crazy side-of-the-road man: S03 E10: "The Diplomatic Corpse" as Janet Wallace in one of the more awful episodes in the entire series (even though it featured Peter Lorre): S04 E08: "Safety for The Witness" as Nurse Copeland who swore allegiance to the witness-of-a-witness to a murder (who happened to be Art Carney):
  5. On Mar 4, 1921, Congress approved the burial of an unidentified American soldier from World War I (U.S. Involvement: 1916-1918). The unknown soldier was brought back from France on 11/11/21, and was buried at the bottom of a three-level marble tomb. Since then, the tomb area has come to represent all American war dead, with the marble plaque reading, "Here Rests In Honored Glory An American Soldier, Known But To God." The tomb guards are members of the Third Infantry Regiment, United States Army. The soldier walking the mat does not wear a rank insignia, so he will not outrank the unknown. The first 24-hour guarding began at midnight, Jul 2, 1937, and has continued uninterrupted ever since, for over 78 years. From Apr 1 - Sep 30, the Changing of the Guard Ceremony takes place every 30 minutes (I recommend arriving either at 20-past or 50-past the hour). Please watch in complete silence, and stand (if you can), removing your hat, when instructed to do so. From Oct 1 - Mar 30, the Ceremony occurs every 2 hours - the Ceremony can be viewed by the public whenever Arlington National Cemetery is open. I have witnessed this Ceremony at least a half-dozen times, and it is near the top of my list for things to do with out-of-town visitors. Not once have I ever been less than enthralled with the Ceremony. Warning: It is something of a hike from the parking area, so consider taking the TourMobile (although in full disclosure I've never done that, so I can't vouch for it one way or the other). Here are some useful websites for visitors: "Plan Your Visit" on arlingtoncemetery.mil "Tomb of the Unknown Soldier" on tombguard.org "Tomb of the Unknowns" on wikipedia.com
  6. If you've driven north-south on 16th Street you've seen them, and if you've driven east-west on Columbia Road you've seen them (at mid-day on Sundays, perhaps for longer than you'd care to). These are the three formidable churches in the Mount Pleasant - Columbia Heights - Adams Morgan neighborhoods - at least the ones prominently visible from 16th Street - and along with numerous other items of architectural interest in the immediate area (e.g., The Temple of the Scottish Rite (also known as "The House of the Temple") on 16th and S Street, the Ecuadorian Embassy on 15th and Euclid Street, the Headquarters of the Inter-American Defense Board (also known as "The Pink Palace") on 16th and Euclid Street, the Lutheran Church Center (also called the Warder-Totten House, which has had more lives than a cat, and could have been tagged in the thread title, but it's not a place of worship), the Meridian House on 16th Street and Crescent Place, and of course, Meridian Hill Park which is 12 acres in size, stretching from Florida Avenue to Euclid Street along the east side of 16th Street, and I'm sure I've omitted several other buildings of merit and interest), anyway, along with this rather amazing concentration of historic architecture (we're talking about architects such as John Russell Pope (arguably the most important architect in Post-1800 Washington, DC, having designed the National Archives Building, the Jefferson Memorial, and the National Gallery of Art (West Building) - those three buildings alone are enough make you say, "Huh?") and George Oakley Totten, Jr. (who designed numerous mansions along 16th Street and in the Kalorama Circle area), we have three churches large enough to stand out and make drivers turn their heads. Sitting up by itself on 16th Street and Columbia Road is the National Baptist Memorial Church: I don't know much about the architecture behind this church (when it was completed, or who designed it), and would love to have someone knowledgeable in architecture comment on the style and the architect. However, I did find an interesting web page devoted to its groundbreaking in 1921, with President Warren G. Harding actually breaking the ground: Apr 23, 2014 - "Historic Photos of the 1921 Groundbreaking for the Columbia Heights National Baptist Memorial Church" on parkviewdc.com And also the 1922 Cornerstone Ceremony attended by Secretary of State Charles E. Hughes. I've read that the building was constructed over a couple of decades (which might make it the youngest of the three churches, despite being designed first - I'm not sure when construction was completed on any of the three): Sep 11, 2014 - "Historic 1922 Photo of National Baptist Memorial Church's Corner Stone Ceremony" on parkviewdc.com As impressive as this church is, it takes a back seat (in visual prominence) to other the two Meridian Hill churches sitting face-to-face on the south side of 16th and Harvard Streets. As you're driving south down 16th Street, you can see all three churches at once, with the one just described in the foreground: Notice also that as you're approaching the southernmost two, there's a Capital Bikeshare rack on the right: In the Architecture Thread in the Art Forum, the book, "The AIA Guide to the Architecture of Washington, DC" is mentioned, and that book refers to both of these next two churches, possibly taking a not-so-subtle swipe at the first, the All Souls Unitarian Church, which was "inspired" (rather blatantly, I will add) by London's Saint-Martin-in-the-Fields, on the southwest corner of the intersection: . The similarities between this and London's famous church are unmistakable. From the book: "1924, Coolidge & Shattuck - St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London, by James Gibbs, provided the architectural inspiration for this building as it did for so many other churches throughout America, Britain, and Canada." Across 16th Street rests, mano-a-mano with the All Souls Unitarian Church, the impressive and beautiful Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, now unfortunately masked by scaffolding: Up above, I said the book "possibly" takes a not-so-subtle swipe at All Souls, but the way they worded it, they could just as easily be talking about the row of rat-infested (I've seen them with my own eyes) storefronts on Mount Pleasant Street, so decide for yourselves (bold emphasis is my own): "1933, Young & Hansen - Designed to suggest the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City and capped by the Angel Moroni, the building, with its delicate, linear detailing, stratified stone skin, and consistent verticality, creates one of the most elegant small churches in town. Or perhaps the sense of success is relative and results from comparing it to its distinctly unsubtle neighbors across the street." Who they're slamming all depends on which "street" they're referring to - it's ambiguous, and could go either way. Regardless, this is a beautiful area for a stroll or a bike ride, and all of the buildings mentioned here are worth seeing.
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