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Found 23 results

  1. You're probably wondering what in the world I'm doing writing about Max Bishop. "Who in the heck is Max Bishop?" you might ask. Bishop was the second baseman, and more importantly, the leadoff hitter, for Connie Mack's great Philadelphia Athletics (AL Champions 1929-1931, and World Series Champions 1930-1931). Still, with Al Simmons, Jimmy Foxx, and Mickey Cochrane on that team, what on earth am I doing writing about Max Bishop? Bishop had a lifetime batting average of .271, but he ranks #15 all-time in on-base percentage at an astounding .423 (just ahead of "Shoeless" Joe
  2. To anyone attending Clemson University during the glorious 1981-1982 season, when Clemson defeated Nebraska 22-15 in the Orange Bowl to become undefeated national champions, the name "William Perry" is universally beloved and just as famous as the name Brooks Robinson is in Baltimore. The Fridge has fallen upon unspeakably hard times, and barring a miracle, his best days are behind him, but he will always be remembered with fondness and affection. Thank you, William, for enriching all of our lives - we all love you. And I can personally vouch for any and all anecdotes you might hear
  3. This world needs more people like Robert F. Smith. The donation may sound small in relation to his worth, but it is fully 1% of his wealth - that is substantial and meaningful by any measure. "Who Is Robert F. Smith? Learn More about the Billionaire whose Generosity Shocked a Graduating Class" by Alejandro de la Garza on time.com
  4. Cant help it folks. I'm a Yankee fan but I gotta get behind the Mets here. Finally looks like they got a good team. Until Wright comes back and spoils it of course.
  5. The great Russian baritone, Dmitri Hvorotovsky, known primarily in America through his recordings of Tschaikovsky and Verdi, passed away this week after a 2 1/2-year struggle with brain cancer. The Metropolitan Opera's loving tribute to Hvorotovsky is here: "Dmitri Hvorotovsky." (Do take a few minutes and watch the videos - the second video was when Hvorotovsky only had about six more months to live.) Nov 22, 2017 - "Dmitri Hvorotovsky, Silver-Mained Baratone from Siberia, Dies at 55" by Anthony Tommasini on nytimes.com
  6. Considering their relative lack of big-name talent over the decades, the Astros have one of the most interesting *team* histories in all of baseball: * From 1888-1961, the only professional baseball in Houston was the Minor League Houston Buffaloes - a (mostlly) Texas League team affiliated (mostly) with the St. Louis Cardinals * They began their life as the Houston Colt .45s (after a "neam the team" contest - the Colt .45 was "the gun that won the West"). Their National League counterparts were the expansion New York Mets, and the two teams alternated draft picks from unprotected pl
  7. With Hollywood westerns, a little bit of research goes a long way - in my lifetime, I've had more success with this genre of movie than perhaps any other, all because I do a little research before choosing what to watch. "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962) is the twelfth of fourteen collaborative westerns with John Ford and John Wayne (the first and ninth, respectively, being "Stagecoach" (1939) and "The Searchers" (1956)). It is perhaps the most beautiful western I've ever seen. Loaded with famous actors, every single major and minor star outperforms in this deceptively sad me
  8. I loved watching "The Saint" when I was in high school - I felt like I'd snuck into a movie theater, and was watching James Bond for free. Last night, I watched Season 1, Episode 1, "The Talented Husband" for the first time ever, and I can honestly say it was one of the single finest hours I have ever seen on television. If you're a Hulu subscriber, I *urge* you to watch this first episode - you will not regret it. I remember the series as being really good, but not *this* good. Sometimes, people have one, great idea, and that's what they use for the pilot in order to sell the show - I su
  9. Everybody needs to start somewhere. I'm not saying this to be mean, but Paula Abdul sings no better than I do, and I have the type of voice where I'm embarrassed to sing the National Anthem at sporting events, or hymns in church - my voice is *that* bad: It's very-much-below average. She's not quite singing out-of-tune (although who knows what technical corrections were made?), but there's absolutely *no* talent behind that voice. What does that tell you about technology in pop music? Next time you watch a music video, see if there are any shots of people dancing for longer than
  10. I won't be issuing any spoilers in this post, but I would urge any-and-all science-fiction fans to watch one of the greatest science-fiction films I've ever seen: "La Jetée" ("The Pier") - a 30-minute French short (translated into English) - the only place I found it was Amazon Prime (*), and it was $3.99 - yes, it hurt paying that for such a short film, but once I watched it, it was worth every penny. For me to say anything about the film would be to ruin it, other than this: It is an art film - absolutely for the art-house cinema folks - and is unlike anything else you've ever seen (wit
  11. When I was in my mid-20s (maybe in the late 80s), "The Manchurian Candidate" made a revival on the big screen, and I saw it, and really enjoyed it while also thinking it was something almost campy. Now that I've seen it a second time, I realize that I was too uneducated to appreciate the film - this was an incredibly well-done movie, somehow able to take the absolutely unbelievable - bordering on the ridiculous - and make it seem positively realistic and possible. For me, The Manchurian Candidate is almost like a "Greatest Hits" album of actors, and I cannot imagine how Frank Sinatr
  12. I don't know why I've always loved "Whaam!", a pop-art, comic-style diptych by Roy Lichtenstein, a New York pop artist born in the same year as my parents, 1923 - but I have, and I guess it's the comic-book-reading little boy of my youth that loves it. "Whaam!" is based on the story, "Star Jockey," from the DC Comics comic book "All American Men of War," issue #89 (Jan-Feb, 1962), and the panel was drawn by Irv Novick. Lichtenstein merely reproduced the panel: This is Novick's work, and Lichtenstein took no credit for originality (or, at least, none that I know of). I went to the Tat
  13. Please don't remember John Glenn only for his partisan politics - the man was, is, and always will be a great American Hero - just look at those tags in this thread, and there could have been more. I have total respect for this great American, and I hope everyone else does, too. Senator Glenn left us earlier today at the age of 95 - we lost a giant today: What a great man.
  14. "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" is one of "those" movies that I never saw because I'm the youngest child - I've seen small clips of the film, and heard it mentioned enough when I was young, to the point where I honestly thought that I had seen it, but I hadn't, and I had, and I hadn't. "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane" received five Academy Award nominations, with Norma Koch winning the award for "Best Costume Design - Black and White." This was Produced and Directed by Robert Aldrich, and is a classic tale of sibling rivalry (that's something of an understatement) between Jane a
  15. "D.L. Menard's 'Back Door' Makes Rolling Stone List" (Of Top 100 Country Songs)" by Herman Fuselier on theadvertiser.com And here is the 1962 Cajun hit by Badeaux and the Louisiana Aces!
  16. I think the greatest multi-pro-sport athlete of the modern era (so post Jim Thorpe) was Bo Jackson. Perhaps his two most amazing moments herewith: Bo Scales The Wall In Baltimore Bo Jackson 91-Yard Run vs. Seahawks, Nov 30, 1987 And, this was incredible too: Bo: The Throw Finally, for those interested, ESPN did an excellent "30 for 30" documentary, which covers the entirety of his amazing but tragically truncated career. The documentary has been removed from YouTube, but you can still probably find it somewhere: "30 for 30 Film 'You Don't Know Bo' is ESPN's Highest-Rated Documentary" b
  17. There is an incidence of a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO selling for $38,115,000, making it the most expensive automobile ever sold at auction: Aug 16, 2014 - "Ferrari 250 GTO Smashes World Auction Record Fetching U.S. $38.1 Million" by Mike Hanlon on gizmag.com Aug 15, 2014 - "1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Hits Record $38 Million Sale at Bonhams' Monterey Auction" by Chris Bruce on autoblog.com I wonder what it is about this particular car that brings such high auction value - obviously, all it takes is two bidders, but there must be something special about it (other than being titanically awesome, of co
  18. The 2015 (15th) International Tschaikovsky Competition took place from Jun 15 - Jul 3, 2015, and is available for recorded streaming at this website. Piano - Violin - Cello - Voice To view all the contestants in all the early rounds, go to the website, then click on your instrument of choice, then click on "Replay." Every single performance throughout the competition is available, and it's a real gift that this is available for free streaming. --- The International Tschaikovsky Competition debuted in 1958, and is *the* competition that made Van Cliburn famous (with Emil Gilels and Svia
  19. Those of a certain age will remember live television broadcasts in the 60s from far away being introduced by the incantation "Live via Telstar!" Telstar wasn't a single communications satellite but a whole generation of them, if I understand correctly, although I thought it was a specific satellite at the time. The British group The Tornados had a big hit with this rather odd instrumental in 1962, which I have loved almost all of my life. Telstar: There are two and possibly three different recordings all purporting to the be original 1962 hit floating around out there. I think this is t
  20. It's pretty amazing that one single concert from over 50 years ago has its own Wikipedia entry, but this was no ordinary concert. The New York Philharmonic Concert of Apr 6, 1962 Here's a 4-minute video with all the controversy encapsulated: And here's the whole thing: I listened to it all, and I was interested in the 3rd movement in particular. There's a good interview with Gould at about the 57:30 point that's well-worth listening to. Gould is noted for dismissing virtuoso pianists who "show off" as opposed to honoring the composer's intentions to the letter, which makes it
  21. Carl Tanner's Website {after the intro, click on his picture to get to the actual website with more clips.} If you have never heard of Carl Tanner, he is one of the great tenors in he world {he sings regularly in Vienna, Dresden and in other great halls of Europe, less so in the US unfortunately.} His Calaf in Turandot is amazing. I had the honor of hearing Maestro Zubin Mehta praise Carl's Calaf in person at a cast and friends dinner in Florence after the generale. He also told Carl to sing Othello which he now does. Carl is performing for free at his church on Christmas Eve. If you
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