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Found 39 results

  1. DonRocks

    Gary Merrill (1915-1990)

    Well, why not. Guess who is the very first person shown in the television series, "The Time Tunnel?" And I'm talking about the first 5 seconds of SE1 EP1?
  2. Glenn Corbett was "the guy who replaced George Maharis on Route 66." While watching "Same Picture, Different Frame," I wondered to myself how this impossibly handsome man could be relatively unknown in today's mind, so I did a little research, and found that Corbett played Zefram Cochrane (inventor of the warp drive!) in the "Star Trek" episode, "Metamorphosis." (Yes, that's Betty from "Father Knows Best.")
  3. I'm certain that I saw Topol in a version of "Fiddler on the Roof," and I think it was on Broadway, but it might have been at National Theater in Washington, DC. Does anyone remember when, and where, Chaim Topol reprised his beloved role as Tevye here in the United States? He was old - in his 70s, perhaps - but not so old that he didn't retain his signature charisma. It's bothering me that I can't find when or where he reprised the role.
  4. Last night, I watched "In Cold Blood" (1967), the magnificent, black-and-white, artsy, non-fiction masterpiece for the second time, and was positively riveted by the performance of Robert Blake, just as I was before - maybe even more so: Blake was nearly perfect in this role. But this is a two-man film, and the "other" co-star, Scott Wilson, was just as effective in his own swaggering, Elvis-like, cold-blooded role as sociopath Dick Hickock, and I began to wonder what, exactly, happened to this fine actor. Where has he been for the past fifty years? So I looked him up, and I can honestly say that, in thirty-five years of being an amateur film scholar, and certainly in the past several years of being a very serious amateur film scholar, I have never experienced such a jaw-dropping moment in my life. Well, there was one other time that came close - when I found out that Merle in "The Walking Dead" was Henry in "Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer." Seriously, I about peed my pants when I found that one out, and that's what inspired me to re-watch "Henry" after not having seen it since it was released in 1986. When I did re-watch it, I could see that, yes, Michael Rooker was both Henry and Merle, even though it took me a couple of days to recover from that shock. But never, *ever* have I been so shocked as when I discovered that Scott Wilson, the man who portrayed Dick Hickock in "In Cold Blood," pictured here with co-star Robert Blake: was the very same person who played, well, see for yourself ... but be forewarned: If you've seen "In Cold Blood" before, and if you're a fan of "The Walking Dead," prepare to have a heart attack.
  5. Jeff Corey (1914-2002) is another fine character actor who merits his own thread (if I see about five different performances, I'm going to give any of these talented actors and actresses their own thread - they deserve it). For those of you who've heard the term, but have never really heard it defined, a "character actor" is someone whose face you've seen a million times, but can't come up with the person's name - there are a lot more of them, both in Hollywood and on television, than you think, and Jeff Corey was certainly one of them. This is but a small portion of what he has done - just what *I've* personally seen in the past couple of years, which should tell you he's done a *lot* more than this. Actively involved in television in the 1960s (Corey was blacklisted from Hollywood for refusing to name names before the House Committee on Un-American Activities in the 1950s), he played a major role as Byron Lomax in the somewhat Orwellian, 1963 episode of "The Outer Limits," - "O.B.I.T": It's fitting that Corey played in Hollywood during the seminal year of 1967, as Mr. Hickock (Dick Hickock's father), in Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood": In 1969, Corey played High Advisor Plasus in an episode of "Star Trek" clearly influenced by Fritz Lang's "Metropolis" - "The Cloud Minders": Back in Hollywood, he plays a vital role in the 1969 film, "True Grit," as Tom Chaney, committing the murder near the very beginning which is the raison d'être of the entire film: From that same, fertile year for Corey, 1969, he played Sheriff Bledsoe in "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid": The following year, 1970, he would play a well-received role as the logical Dr. Miles Talmadge on "Night Gallery's" "The Dead Man":
  6. If you want to pay a brief tribute to Burt Reynolds, watch "The Bard," (<--- Hulu link here) where he forever-angered Marlon Brando. (Really, how many people know that Reynolds got decked by William Shakespeare?) I watched "Deliverance" last night for about the fifth time, and loved it just as much as ever.
  7. Most people of a certain age know that George Reeves played "Superman" in the original television series. Many people know that he died of suicide, by a suspicious gunshot. But who knew that he spoke the very first lines in "Gone with the Wind?!"
  8. When I was a young adult, Pee-Wee Herman was everywhere - nearly as ubiquitous as Barney.This, until it all came crashing down one evening in a movie theater, where Rubens was arrested for lewd behavior, indecent exposure, etc. Yes, he was gay. Which is is precisely why I believe a Presidential pardon is a legitimate option (albeit not anytime soon) - times have changed, and while, on the surface, getting caught yanking it in a movie theater may seem like an "oops," back then it was a career-ending transgression. I hope this doesn't offend anyone, but I pretty much give carte blanche on the "transgressions" of gay people, pre-acceptance: bathhouses, casual sex, The Follies, glory holes - hey, these people have sex drives like the rest of us, and even though, in reality, some of this behavior was extraordinarily risky (cf: "Dallas Buyers Club") it is *all* understandable, completely forgivable, and quite honestly, had I known the shame and humiliation gay and lesbian people were going through - all because they were *perfectly normal* and needed sex, as surely as someone needs a glass of water - I would have given them the keys to my house, gone out to dinner, and said, "Here, have fun - back in a couple of hours." Maybe I'm wrong, and I'm certainly open-minded to reading other opinions (no matter what your opinions, your viewpoints and perspectives will absolutely be tolerated here, as long as they don't involve politics, religion, or mean comments about other people. I realize the "Presidential pardon" comment is political, so you should feel free to ignore that, and simply discuss the issue in general - or anything else you wish to discuss about Reubens.) I do know that there were some issues down the road, regarding underage pornography, and sure, the line must be drawn somewhere - but I don't know any specifics regarding Mr. Reubens' situation; only about the career-ending incident in the movie theater, which I believe to be the height of intolerance and cruelty.
  9. There is the artist, and then there is the man. The Little Tramp and the Refugees Who Loved, Then Loathed Him, by Dove Barbanel, December 29, 2017, on nytimes.com.
  10. I grew up watching "The Dick van Dyke Show," and am watching an episode right now - at age 92, the great, comedic genius Dick van Dyke is going strong, and is a childhood favorite of mine. He is *so* talented, and so likable - I'm currently watching "The Great Petrie Fortune" - about an inherited desk with a mysterious song behind the inheritance, foretelling a treasure within. Dick van Dyke is awesome - the thing I've seen him in most recently is "Divorce American Style." I was thinking that was the great George Carlin's debut; I was wrong - his debut was "With Six You Get Eggroll." I so wish you all would get into these TV and Film Forums - they'll be here forever, and could be *so* interesting with enough discussion; with me just blathering by myself, they aren't so compelling. Just remember: This is an Evergreen Website, and nothing you write here will ever go to waste. When you post here, you're writing a love-letter to your grandchildren.
  11. My wife has been a fan of Glen Hansard for maybe the last half dozen years or so. My first impressions were that he was overwrought. A little too moody for me. Not inventive. Songs sounded too similar. Meh. But....I love my wife. And she's indulged me in my fascination with metal. And besides, I generally love Scottish and Irish music. I'm a huge Silly Wizard fan, for example. So when she suggested we see Glen Hansard at The Anthem, while I initially was not wild about it, I remembered these things and remembered that she's also turned me on to many bands and other performers that I loe dearly so, of course, we set the plans in motion. This concert was a week or two ago. It was GREAT. Tremendous performer and band. A storyteller. Inclusive. Infectious. And clearly I had been doing things wrong. Many songs, while unfamiliar to me absolutely were great. I need to listen to his stuff MORE LOUDLY. And some blew me away. Like this absolute gem. I think they stretched this to about 9 minutes. To say I was elated to see this performed by folks at the top of their game is an understatement.
  12. Nov 30, 2014 - "In Conversation: Chris Rock" by Frank Rich on vulture.com This is a good interview. One thing that was incredibly poignant to me was Chris Rock's description of black people needing teeth pulled in Andrews, SC.
  13. Some people might recognize Thomas Gomez, né Sabino Tomas Gomez, because he has one of "those" unforgettable faces - never on display more prominently than in the "Twilight Zone" episode, "Escape Clause," in which he played The Devil himself, complete with a Sebastian Cabot-like chortle (recall Cabot's role as "Pip" in "A Nice Place To Visit"). However, Gomez was primarily in films, after getting his start in theater. Although it's bittersweet that Gomez is perhaps most notable for being the first-ever Hispanic-American actor ever to be nominated for an Academy Award (for Best Supporting Actor in the 1947 film, "Ride the Pink Horse"), his talents should carry the day in the long run. In "Escape Clause," he's just about perfect in his role, and I'd love to learn more about him by watching his films - which extend over a period of decades.
  14. If you enjoy a Louis CK-style of standup, you might enjoy Rory Scovel, who has recently come out with a Netflix special called "Rory Scovel Tries Stand-Up for the First Time." If you aren't familiar with Scovel (I doubt this is his first-ever stand-up, despite the name), he's a solid, somewhat unorthodox, talent whom I would put in the second tier behind the best-of-the-best. This is not to say that he isn't funny - there were moments in this routine that were laugh-out-loud funny - merely that this probably won't be "The Best" stand-up special you've ever seen. Still, I found it well-worth watching. He is absolutely influenced by Louis CK, but his humor, while extremely crude, doesn't quite hit the border of "inappropriate" (CK's bit about pedophilia shocked even me). Still, Scovel isn't afraid to make jokes using topics such as genocide, anal sex, etc. - he isn't crude for crude's sake, but he is often crude, so if that offends you, be forewarned. I enjoyed this special, and can recommend it to others - not as anything ground-breaking, but as good, solid, stand-up comedy.
  15. Many people don't realize "The Singing Cowboy" was in professional rodeo, played some type of professional baseball, and was the owner of the California Angels from 1961 until 1997 (!) Here's Gene Autry on "What's My Line?" in 1953: This post is dedicated to Robert Power (1927-2017), father of DIShGo.
  16. Lawrence Harvey was a South African who was born in Lithuania. 1962 - as Raymond Shaw in "The Manchurian Candidate" - Feb 30, 1972 - as Mr. Macy in "The Caterpillar" on ""The Night Gallery" - I've been saying this since I was a child, and have still never seen anything more chilling on TV: Oct 30, 2015 - "Night Gallery's 'Earwig' Episode Might Be Greatest Horror TV Episode Ever" by Julian Spivey on thewordwebzine.weekly.com
  17. IMHO, Patton Oswalt is one of the funniest comics out there. His new stand-up special on Netflix, "Annihilation" is riotously funny and at the same time tremendously poignant. During the first third or so of the show, Oswalt lays down some jokes about the current POTUS that are freakin' hilarious. I have copied and pasted one of my favorite jokes below and whited it out so you can view it by highlighting. I don't want to offend anyone who doesn't appreciate humor regarding this topic. The rest of the show is devoted to his experience, over the last year, of dealing with the unexpected death of his wife and impact on his young son. Obviously a heavy and personal topic, but Oswalt pulls it off without being maudlin or undignified. I've never seen any stand-up routine quite like it. Actually, I feel bad about calling it a stand-up routine-- it's much more. I highly recommend it. A review from the AV Club Now the joke: --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "And by the way, I feel bad — I feel bad for Trump.The poor guy — look. Here's what happened.They had that, that, uh, the journalist dinner, the correspondents dinner. Obama went up, made fun of Donald, very mean. And Donald said, "I'm takin' his job. You don't make fun of me. I'll take your job." Spent all this money. Now he has the job, and he's sittin' there, goin', "This job sucks. My life before this was amazing, it was golf and hookers and jets." Donald Trump taking Obama's job would be like if the head of linguistics at Rutgers made fun of David Lee Roth. And David Lee Roth was like, "I'm gonna take his job,zibbly-bobbly-boop." And then he spends 40 million dollars. And he goes into that first meeting like, "All right, I'm the head of linguistics at Rutgers! Bring on the hookers and the cocaine!" And they're like, "No, we're gonna talk about the lack of recursion in German Romantic poetry." And he's like, "Humaly-bebaly-zibbly-boobly? What just happened?"" ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  18. I remember you were the first person to say this, and then I started noticing what a blowhard he is - it got real old, real fast. The thing is, I agree with much of what Stephen Smith says, and I enjoy his content, but I'm just getting tired of him SCREAMING IN MY EAR !!!
  19. Robert Duvall, almost surely most famous for his work in "The Godfather" franchise, began his career in 1952. Here are some excerpts: 1962 - as Arthur "Boo" Radley in "To Kill a Mockingbird" - 1963 - as Charley Parkes in "Miniature" on "The Twilight Zone" - 1964 - as Louis Mace in "Chameleon" on "The Outer Limits" - 1969 - as Lucky Ned Pepper in "True Grit" - 1970 - as Major Frank Burns in "MASH" -
  20. It's funny how knowledge builds upon itself - I was looking at "The Man in the Funny Suit," which somehow led me to "The Balance of Terror," which led me to "The Enemy Below," and I noticed that this was Doug McClure's film debut (this post could just as easily go in the Film Forum). I knew the name Doug McClure well, but I didn't know why, so I went to his Wikipedia page, and started reading - although he's most famous for his role in "The Virginian," I've never watched TV westerns (not even "Gunsmoke"), so that wasn't it. But I kept reading, and lo and behold, he played in "Mr. Denton on Doomsday." Until recently, I'd never watched TV since I was in high school (I don't even have one plugged in), but I'm becoming more-and-more convinced that Rod Serling is one of the most important figures in television history. I've done a fair amount of reading about him, and he was on the front lines of race equality, but was stymied by Hollywood bureaucracy, and had to walk a fine line between doing what he wanted, and towing the party line - it's amazing how much his scripts were destroyed in the process: 03/27/08 - "Uncensored: 'Twilight Zone' Creator's Script on Emmett Till Case" by William Cates on washingtonpost.com Anyway, Doug McClure, as Mr. Grant, played only a small role late in the episode, but I encourage anyone wanting to watch a representative "Twilight Zone" episode to see that one (it's not "the best" or anything, but it's quite good, and it will make you feel sorry for Mr. Denton (Dan Duryea) within the first three minutes) - it's available for free to Amazon Prime members.
  21. William Windom (1923-2012) Dec 22, 1961: William Windom as Major in "Five Chraracters in Search of an Exit" on "The Twilight Zone" - Feb 21, 1963: Windom as Dr. Wallman in "Miniature" (with a young Robert Duvall) on "The Twilight Zone" - Oct 20, 1967: Windom as Commodore Matt Decker in "The Doomsday Machine" on "Star Trek" - Feb 30, 1972: Windom as Professor Putman in "Little Girl Lost" on "Night Gallery" - --- Now I'm going to focus on one thing which nobody has ever written about - it occurred in 1971. Jan 20, 1971: Windom starred as Randy Lane in the acclaimed episode, "They're Tearing Down Tim Riley's Bar," on "Night Gallery." Mar 30, 1971: William also guest starred as Eddie Frazier in "Success Story" on "All in the Family." So, what's the link, other than William Windom? The song, "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow." In both of these episodes, the song plays a major, pathetic role, i.e., Pathos with a capital "P." Is this coincidence? I don't think so. It also just so happens that these are two of the greatest episodes in their respective series. Especially, on "All in the Family," it could easily bring a tear to your eye; on "Night Gallery," it's the only episode that was ever nominated for a Primetime Emmy award. "All in the Family" was the superior of the two series, so even though Windom plays a smaller part, it resonates like the chimes of Big Ben (you can watch a fair-to-poor-quality version for free on Dailymotion, but I can't recommend it). In my mind, these two episodes will forever link William Windom through this one song.
  22. Warren Stevens was a very recognizable character actor on many television series from the late 40s to the late aughts, and has a very recognizable face, as he's been in some of our (well, "my") favorites: Oct 9, 1955 - Perry Stanger in "Premonition" on "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" - Mar 15, 1956 - Lt. "Doc" Ostrow in "Forbidden Planet" - Nov 4, 1960 - Richard Crown in "The Strengthening Angels" on "Route 66" - Jan 19, 1962 - Nate Bledsoe in "Dead Man's Shoes" on "The Twilight Zone" - Feb 23, 1968 - Rojan in "By Any Other Name" on "Star Trek" - Dec 15, 1971 - Officer Art McCall in "The Dinosaur" on "Adam 12" -
  23. Jeffrey Hunter was a ruggedly handsome actor, popular in the 50s and 60s, and best known as Captain Christopher Pike on "Star Trek." Hunter was on track for a long career when he suffered unfortunate, probably related, back-to-back injuries in 1968 and 1969: the first, a concussion sustained by an on-set implosion; the second, an intracranial hemorrhage incurred by hitting his head after a fall. More prolific in film than television, Hunter was in dozens of movies between 1950 and 1969, including his roles as Martin Pawley in "The Searchers" (1956), and Jesus Christ in "King of Kings" (1960). Rockology: The Alfred Hitchcock Hour - Harold in "Don't Look Behind You" "Star Trek" - Captain Christopher Pike in "The Cage" and "The Menagerie"
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