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Found 110 results

  1. Hey how'd you do that Don? LOL Washington City Paper reports on an upcoming cider producer and pintxos bar that will also have various ciders on draft and by the bottle.
  2. This new massive restaurant from the owner of Masseria opened last week on the Wharf, so we went last night. The entrance is right on Maine Avenue, unlike the majority of the restaurants on the Wharf. You walk into a relatively casual café and market, and are led to your table upstairs to a swankier dining room. The room was a little too brightly lit for our tastes, but I know many complain about rooms being too dark, so we may be in the minority. We started with a decent bourbon and amaro cocktail to start, followed by delicious buffalo mozzarella and figs stuffed with ricotta and nduja. We then split a delicious pasta (note: I am FAR from a pasta snob/expert, so others may disagree) filled with cauliflower with a hint of anchovy before our entrees: decadent tortellini filled with fall squash for my fiancé, and a whole branzino with a dill-lemon emulsion for the entrée. My branzino was very good but unexciting (to be clear, I didn't expect it to be exciting when I ordered it), and the sauce was tangy and refreshing. The tortellini was fantastic and a decent portion; the parmesan on it reminded me, in the best way, of the nostalgia of the Kraft pre-grated cheese in the green container that we all grew up with. The side of beets we got with mint, oranges and fennel was a HUGE portion for $10. Lastly, we shared a rhum cake with freshly whipped cream that was outstanding. Service was super friendly and, for the most part, knowledgeable. Our waitress was quite engaging and glad to show off her knowledge of the menu. One quirk: we mentioned during our meal that we wanted to check out the vaunted "Amaro Library" after dinner. Before our entrees came, our waitress said they had spots open and that we should go now. We resisted a bit because we were happy at our table and didn't want all the food to have to be brought to the bar, but she was pretty insistent, saying that the bar would likely fill up soon. So we went, regretfully so. I love eating at the bar alone, but it made it difficult to carry on as nice of a conversation when we weren't sitting face-to-face. Worse, the bartender, who was otherwise perfectly nice, was a bit stressed out about all the tickets coming in from the waiters, and got a bit snippy with them, which dampened the mood a bit. As for the amaro bar itself, we were let down. Despite having an interesting-looking collection, there was no menu, so we didn't know what was available and what flavors they had. The friendly bartender revealed that he had limited knowledge of the actual amari and had to defer to a colleague for some help. We liked what we ended up getting, but were disappointed considering how much they've hyped up their amaro bar. The selection and knowledge at Little Coco's is much better, at least for now. The crowd, by the way, was extremely Sceney, the same type of crowd you'd find at RPM or Nobu. Not sure what it is about the Wharf that attracts these crowds (not that I totally dislike it), but it's starkly different from the people you'd see at other restaurants in the city.
  3. A couple of weeks ago a friend and I walked up on a Friday in the hopes that we could snag a seat at Brother's and Sister's. As we walked up the front steps, we were "greeted" by two large bouncers, who when we told them we didn't have a reservation, boxed us out, and wouldn't let us even move further up the steps of the property and told us to leave. I guess a 40 year old lawyer is very scary looking and not the demographic they were going for. It was very off putting, I don't really know what the purpose was of the treatment, perhaps, they could have just told us they were fully booked and we should try for another night. I know it was Friday, soon after opening, but it was a pretty rude treatment.
  4. I didn't see a thread for Vola's so I thought I would start one. Website Vola's is located in the old Waterfront Market space. They have both the restaurant and outside seating on the boardwalk at the waterfront currently open. I went for lunch yesterday. The inside has that seaside casual seafood joint vibe to it, and I thought it was nice for this location. The outside seating really hasn't changed at all from Waterfront Market. I would suspect that it will do really well. The space is laid out similarly to Waterfront Market with the bar where the service counters were located. I thought the menu had a nice selection of items and will go back and try other things, especially as my office is next door. I don't think they are near as good as Drift, but after one meal, it is not a bad option in Old Town. My server was Donovan, I would go back alone for the service. He was just genuinely nice and warm, but was very professional at the same time. I really enjoyed having him as my server. The food came out in a reasonable time for my lunch break, which is more than can be said for Blackwall Hitch. I had the grouper sandwich. It tasted to me like the grouper was done via sous vide then seared off, but I am not sure, and I don't care if it was as it kept the fish very moist, but also appropriately flavored, but the texture of the fish didn't fall apart, like the salmon I must have sous vide for too long the other night. I really like the sandwich, I thought it had a good bread, sauce, lettuce ratio and nice seasoning. The fries with old bay were delicious and I ate way more than I needed to- although I am quite partial to Old Bay on about anything. The coleslaw was also pretty darn good. It was on the sweet side, but not real sugary like they serve some places down south, I thought it had a nice balance to it and I like the thinness of the sauce. I thought the prices were in line with this part of town for what you got. I am hoping they have a fish taco special every now and then. But I definitely will go try more of the menu. Same photo from the Where did I Dine thread of the sandwich.
  5. I couldn't find a topic on this neighborhood joint (and I've been spending a lot of time there) so I decided to add one. This place is a big reason for my jump back on the beer bandwagon. They always have a great beer on tap and really nothing beats drinking outside on a nice day. The place is a little crazy with children during the early hours but eases in to an older crowd as it gets later. There is actually some decent food at the deli counter depending on the day, and if you want beer to go Westover simply has one of the greatest selections in the area, including kegs.
  6. "What's our collective verdict on Hard Times?", Al asks as his stomach rumbles from a lunch of Texas 5-way with a side of jalepenos.
  7. Morris is opening next month (Feb). It will be the sister establishment to Sheppard. Quotes from DC Eater: "Located at 1020 7th St. NW, Morris will be twice as big as The Sheppard and divided into two stories spanning 1,400 square feet. Morris, which is backed by Mendelsohn, business partner Vinoda Basnayake, and Strauss, is now shooting for a March opening." "Potential offerings include: East New York Flip (bourbon, tawny port, honey, egg yolk, cream, nutmeg); American Trilogy (rye, apple brandy, brown sugar, orange bitters); Ivy City Swizzle (vodka, lime, mint, peychaud’s); and Feminist Gent (vodka, luna amara, lime, orange, ginger, soda), among others. Cocktails are priced at $12 each; cheese and charcuterie pairings from local provider Cheese Monster will be available for sale. " Website
  8. Congratulations to Brothers and Sisters (but everyone knows lists like these are a load of baloney, right?)
  9. Any suggestions where to watch the CAPS game Tuesday night around Tysons. Went to BJs last week, almost died from a bad burger.
  10. Has anyone stopped in at this new Neighborhood Restaurant Group restaurant yet (where Bookbinders used to be)? I saw an article that said they opened the main floor this week. I was looking through the lunch and dinner menus on their website, and the reuben eggroll caught my eye.
  11. "I like to watch" - perhaps one of the most memorable lines ever uttered by Peter Sellers. I agree that the Columbia Room deserves some investigation. Derek's running a "Shaking vs Stirring" session on Wed 3/24. Drinks include Dry Martini, Gimlet, Ramos Gin Fizz, Sazerac and Golden Gin Fizz.. This has a great deal of appeal to me (as long as I work doesn't take me out of town). Anyone else interested?
  12. Anyone else tried out the Tonic that recently opened at the former Quigley's Pharmacy on 21st Street? No liquor license yet (the hostess said they might hear today -- right), but four of my colleagues and I had a good lunch. I had a really good burger and there are several versions on the menu. Hand-made patty with good quality bun. I had the guacamole burger which was pretty messy but delicious with housemade guac and cheese. There is a bar (and the beer taps are in place though still dry) that seats about 15 and downstairs as well as upstairs table seating. There is also a third floor lounge with what looks like a conference room where a private party could be accommodated. Nice space and efficient service. If you go for lunch and don't want to sit at the bar best to make a reservation.
  13. The aforesaid JV's "Live Music Room" was not there when we went there in late October/early November of 2014. They sure could use it though, because prior capacity was about 50, and that included people having to sit in booths with their backs to the stage. I grew up about a mile from this place, played Little League baseball at a field directly adjacent to this strip mall, and I always felt like (with no real evidence) that this was a "locals" bar that you did not want to enter if you did not already belong to the group of regulars. I was not one of said regulars. When I entered for the first time, a couple of months ago, I think I was probably right had it been 10 or 20 years earlier. Now, it seems very welcoming, but the décor is stuck in the past, a la Vienna Inn. We only had beers (no draft beer at the time), so I cannot comment on the food, other than it looked like a somewhat limited, standard dive bar menu. The live music seems to be the real attraction, so hopefully the addition of the "Live Music Room" will allow them to book some slightly bigger acts. To that end, the strip mall and the size of JV's kind of reminds me of the original Birchmere down at the back end of Fairlington, in a similar strip mall t0 JV's that I think was razed and subsumed into what is now the expanded (over the original) Shirlington shopping/eating district.
  14. Hank Dietle's Tavern seems to have been ignored...last outpost of "old" Rockville....great hamburgers, interesting clientele. Gone but not forgotten. From the AOL guide: Just across the Pike from White Flint shopping, Dietle's little bar charges less for a beer than most people pay to tip the valets in Rockville's most upscale mall. Though it's "Cold Beer" sign and country house style look a little quirky among the fast food joints and neon lights on Rockville Pike, Hank Dietle's Tavern is Montgomery County's last true roadhouse. It's a welcome retreat -- a no-nonsense neighborhood bar with cheap beer and cheap eats. The old wooden floors still creak when you walk across the room, but nobody inside seems to care about the history. The tavern is rumored to have once been a schoolhouse or maybe a country store that dates back to the early 1900s. There's no chance you'll be wowed, but 8 wooden booths (whittled with old names), a jukebox (country and classic) and a couple of pinball machines give the place character. It's a great place to catch a game or chat with a friend. -- Denise Iacangelo and then there's this: One Rockville restaurant, Dietle's Tavern, contends it has closed because Montgomery County's smoking ban caused them to lose substantial business.
  15. I hear Johnny Brenda's is cool place to hang out, from the group that has a place called The Standard Tap.
  16. Captain Gregory's speakeasy inside Sugar Shack is now in soft open - we tried it last week and we will be back. They are open Thursday - Sunday evenings starting at 6pm You make reservations via text 571-281-0059 and when you arrive you pull on the whiskey flag and the slid open the door to check for reservation. There is a two hour limit and a $30 / person minimum. There are about 22 seats and it is very dimly lit (had trouble seeing menu) by candlelight and the music is via LP. We had a great time, after the first round we moved over to the bar and chatted with the bartender Sam who was friendly and talkative. he makes most of the bitters and flavored boozes himself. The food options ($12) when we were there were long johns one with Brie/Fig/Bacon (YUM) and the other was a brushutta type (also good) The drinks ($10-15) all have a story and are all wonderful we had quite a few and all were unique and very wonderful
  17. Tried Amor y Amargo last night (Friday). Yes, it's very small, and I'm glad I was there early when it wasn't crowded. It's a narrow space with only about 6, 7? (not sure exactly how many) seats at the bar plus standing room. I got there soon after it opened at 5pm, and I thought I was too early, but by 5:20pm, the bar seats were all taken and a couple of people were standing. I enjoyed the Diamonds and Guns (going by the menu online: Atsby Armadillo Cake vermouth, chartreuse, genever, white rum, celery bitters). Boozy but balanced so you weren't overwhelmed. Based on the menu, the cocktails seem to be pretty strong in alcohol so I only had one cocktail (pacing myself because I was going to Booker and Dax and Pouring Ribbons next
  18. Walked by at lunch and saw the Now Open sign out front. Turns out it was their opening day. Hope springs eternal when it comes to Bethesda delis, so I decided to give it a shot. It's pretty bare bones space, with a handful of tables inside and an outdoor space with a few plastic tables. But delis don't need to be fancy if the food is good. There the news is somewhat hopeful. The matzo ball soup is solid, with a big fluffy ball and broth that could have been a bit more flavorful but overall was very nice. My litmus test for delis is pastrami. Heckman's is solidly in the thick-cut pastrami camp and the good news is that it's undeniably juicy and well-balanced. But it's also uncomfortably fatty -- not the unctuous kind of fat that melts in your mouth but the kind that makes the sandwich hard to eat when it's stacked high. I ended up trimming some of the fat myself and then enjoyed the sandwich. Surprisingly, they didn't have pickles, which at a deli is unfathomable but presumably will be rectified soon. Service was somewhat confused, which is not surprising on day one. To be fair to the wait staff, I think the problems largely originated in the kitchen. Overall, I'm somewhat more hopeful than some of the other delis that have come and gone in Bethesda.
  19. Just an fyi, I wrote this up for BYT, but a new french-inspired place is opening on 9th Street. Here's a first look. "Brought to us by Phil Rodriguez and Joey Belcher, of Sticky Rice on H Street, and Mick Mier and Joe Steger the design team responsible for Science Club, Napoleon and Sesto Senso, 1905 will offer French-inspired bistro fare. They hope 1905 will be a cozy addition to the neighborhood. The kind of place you want to eat, hang out, drink some wine, then come back the next night and do it again."
  20. That kind of talk can get you thrown out of certain bars in Manhattan. East Village Bar Bans Customers Who Say ‘Literally’ by Clint Rainey, January 24, 2018, on grubstreet.com.
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