Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Bethesda'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Todos son Bienvenidos Aquí.
    • Todos son Bienvenidos Aquí.
  • Restaurants, Tourism, and Hotels - USA
    • New York City Restaurants and Dining
    • Los Angeles Restaurants and Dining
    • San Francisco Restaurants and Dining
    • Houston Restaurants and Dining
    • Philadelphia Restaurants and Dining
    • Washington DC Restaurants and Dining
    • Baltimore and Annapolis Restaurants and Dining
  • Restaurants, Tourism, and Hotels - International
    • London Restaurants and Dining
    • Paris Restaurants and Dining
  • Shopping and News, Cooking and Booze, Parties and Fun, Travel and Sun
    • Shopping and Cooking
    • News and Media
    • Events and Gatherings
    • Beer, Wine, and Cocktails
    • The Intrepid Traveler
    • Fine Arts And Their Variants
  • Marketplace
  • The Portal

Calendars

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Los Angeles
    • Northridge
    • Westside
    • Sawtelle
    • Beverly Grove
    • West Hollywood
    • Hancock Park
    • Hollywood
    • Mid
    • Koreatown
    • Los Feliz
    • Silver Lake
    • Westlake
    • Echo Park
    • Downtown
    • Southwest (Convention Center, Staples Center, L.A. Live Complex)
    • Financial District
    • Little Tokyo
    • Arts District
    • Chinatown
    • Venice
    • LAX
    • Southeast Los Angeles
    • Watts
    • Glendale
    • Pasadena
    • Century City
    • Beverly Hills
    • San Gabriel
    • Temple City
    • Santa Monica
    • Culver City
    • Manhattan Beach
    • Thousand Oaks
    • Anaheim
    • Riverside
    • Palm Springs
    • Barbecue
    • Breakfast
    • Chinese
    • Cuban
    • Diners
    • Food Trucks
    • Hamburgers
    • Korean
    • Mexican (and Tex
    • Taiwanese
    • Thai

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 141 results

  1. Crave, a restaurant that specializes in sushi, wine and American cuisine, is the latest eating establishment to announce plans to be part of Westfield Montgomery mall's new Dining Terrace. Bethesda will be the first venture into the Mid-Atlantic region for Crave, which has nine locations in the Midwest, Florida and Texas.
  2. Family friendly, somewhere in Bethesda with at least partially edible food. We ended up at Buffalo Wild Wings at Navy Yard for the last half of today’s game and we all feel pretty lousy for it. But the camaraderie was great.
  3. Didn't see a thread on this place but targeting a February opening. A little research indicates this is from the same people who run St. Arnold's Mussel Bar.
  4. Bethesda Bagels, on Bethesda Ave. near the Barnes and Noble also makes authentic NY style bagel* that are first boiled, then baked. My mother (who is now 96) told me that when she was young she used to make her own bagel, when she lived in places where they were unavailable. When I was growing up in Los Angeles, we lived in a Jewish neighborhood where there were many bakeries and delis. Bagel, along with onion pletzel, bialy, corn rye and challah, were always in the house. My mother always preferred "egg bagel," which had egg in the dough and were a bit softer, over "water bagel" which are the denser, chewier NY style. Interesting to learn today, via one of Darkstar's posts, that Montreal bagel have egg in them. My mother's preference may reflect her Canadian childhood: though she lived in Winnipeg, not Montreal, it's my understanding that many Canadian Jews emigrated from the same general area in Belarus during the years leading up to WW1, often heading first to Toronto before moving to other Canadian cities. Mimi Sheraton wrote a fascinating history of the bialy. I wonder if there is a similarly well-written book about the bagel. *my father, a notorious language pedant, always insisted that the plural of bagel is bagel. I often lapse into the Americanized usage of the plural but since I am talking about my family history here, I'll respect my father's nitpick.
  5. Update on the Bethesda Fine Dining Location, which reports a May opening (credit--Bethesda Magazine)
  6. Carlos recognized me almost instantly. I thought he looked like he'd put on a few pounds. But there was no mistaking the man running the front of the house at Louisiana Kitchen, which opened last Saturday in the former New Orleans Bistro space on Cordell Ave. The menu is almost exactly, exactly the same as that of the now-departed Louisiana Express. They even managed to carry over the phone number from Louisiana Express: 301 652 6945. The only accidental omission, Carlos admitted, was the "Cajun pizza". They're going to try to run without it for now. Prices seem to be very slightly higher...a quarter here, fifty cents there, maybe a buck on a few of the apps. But the setting is now fresh and shiny, with new furniture, dishes and flatware, and finally some room between the tables. Yes, the spicy fries are back! Running the kitchen is co-owner José Blanco, the long-time chef at L.E. The two of them managed to hire many of the former staff from L.E., although I didn't see any of them on this Thursday afternoon. Several locations for the venture were considered from Silver Spring to Frederick, but when the former New Orleans Bistro space came available, everything clicked into place. The space came broom-clean with none of the decorations, so the interior re-do has been limited to a new floor, some paint and wallpaper, new fixtures, and the addition of a window from the dining room to the back of the rotisserie. There aren't that many clichéd doohickeys on the wall yet. José's in-laws are helping with some ongoing tweaks to the interior, but otherwise it's up and running. There's also a little blurb on their website regarding the passing of Peter Finkhauser, the owner of Louisiana Express.
  7. I tried using the useless p-o-s search function here and didn't find a thread, so please merge if need be. Has anyone been here? We're having dinner there tonight.
  8. Don Pollo, at 7007 Wisconsin Ave in Bethesda (just south of Bradley Blvd). Wow! Some of the best Peruvian chicken I've ever had. Mash potatoes to die for and great Cole Slaw, All for $6 dollars
  9. We're going to see some friends play Friday night at an Irish bar called Flanagans on Cordell Avenue and want to have dinner beforehand. What's good these days in the moderate category near the bar so we can park early and then walk? --- [The following posts have been split into separate threads: Flanagan's Irish Pub (ustreetguy) Buono Sera (porcupine) Kabob Bazaar (Pool Boy) Bangkok Garden (Pool Boy) Grapeseed (Choirgirl21) Parking in Bethesda (jrichstar) Tout de Sweet (jandres374) Freddy's Lobster and Clams (jandres374) Pizzeria Da Marco (Pool Boy) Jetties (jandres374) Bold Bite (Pool Boy) bd's Mongolian Grill (jandres374) Red Tomato (Pool Boy)]
  10. Surprised there isn't a thread for this place yet. It has, for my money, the best Ethiopian food in Shaw/U Street. Wonderful veggie platters, plus delicious kitfo and doro wat. Note that they don't have fuul or chicken tibs though (just beef and lamb). Great takeout too; tons of food at great prices. Anyway, I'm posting because of this exciting, yet concerning article. Chercher is expanding, which is great, but the article contains a tidbit that I desperately hope will turn out not to be the case: ""Abebe says he’s also started work on a 60-seat Columbia Heights location at 3608 14th Street NW that’s scheduled to open in February. That Chercher, the smallest of the bunch, will house a large kitchen in the back where staffers will prepare and cook all of the food for the entire chain. Abebe says he’s installing a central kitchen, in part, to maintain quality control across the brand. "Ethiopian Chain Chercher Plots Massive Area Expansion" by Lenore Adkins on dc.eater.com (*) “The problem is … they don’t cook the same,” Abebe told Eater DC. “Because why does it take a while to cook a stew, like chicken stew long hours? So we (will) cook in one place so everywhere people go, they get the same kind of food.”" They're going to make all the food in Columbia Heights and then, what, reheat it? This sounds like a no-good, very bad plan.
  11. M&N's Pizza is so weird and yet so awesome. It is in a micro turret shaped building. They sell beer, too. They make mostly average pizza. But they make two pizzas of note. One of them for the pure awesome hilarity of it and the other because it actually tastes good! My coworkers discovered this place years ago and it has become the defacto place the company orders pizzas from for office things. Office lunches or meetings. Whatever. Like I said, most of it is just so blerghishly average. But the guy running the place is so friendly and nice that you just want to buy more stuff from him. He's infectious. That being said they make a cheeseburger pizza. I know, I know. What the hell?! Close your eyes, breath in the vapor through opened mouth and nose, as you inhal-o-latch in to the first bite and what do you think? McDonald's Cheeseburger. I kid you not. It's probably been 15 years since I had one of those things. Maybe longer. But it somehow is so universally known that it just is. This is that cheeseburger in pie form. Pure awesome hilarity. The other one, despite having average crust, sauce and cheese, is the Spicy Thai pizza. I am not really a fan of thematic pizzas, but I'm game to try it. It may not be exactly Thai, it is pizza after all, and even though the flavors are not purely authentic Thai, it oddly scratches the bizzaro itch you did not know you had. It's a devious pizza because all you really want is the flavor and not the average crust. Is it a place you want to go to and eat? Maybe not, at least maybe not more than a few times, but I'll bet you'll be back if only for the guy running it and that damn Spicy Thai pizza.
  12. I have received information about an incredible dinner. The meal will take place on Thursday, August 30th at Q by Peter Chang in Bethesda. The address is 450 East West Highway, #100, Bethesda, MD 20814. Dinner will be served in a private dining room starting at 7pm. The service of the meal will be family style. . A Taste of Home: Chef Peter Chang’s Hubei Tasting Dinner $60 Per Person (exclusive of beverage, tax, and gratuity) 7PM – 9PM FIRST COURSE Wuhan Sesame Noodles Cilantro Shrimp Ball Hot & Numbing Shredded Chicken w/Crepe SOUP Ginko Duck Soup THIRD COURSE Chang’s Homemade Fish Cake Hot Pot Chrysanthemum Greens and Tofu Rice Ball Pan-Fried Rice Flour Steamed Pork Belly Grandma’s Shredded Pork with Green Pepper Chicken Mushroom Curry Stew Chopped Chili Curry Stew Coral Branzino FOURTH COURSE Sweet Osmanthus Dates Executive Chef, Peter Chang Reservations required: (240) 800-3722
  13. Silly website aside, I wonder if will be in the same league as his Provence, which was brilliant. Mashed potatoes with a ladle of rosemary-infused olive oil where the gravy goes....mmmmmmmmmmmm
  14. My wife and I were strolling around Bethesda one Saturday evening, free of child and looking for a new experience. We heard that Thelo had recently opened and it looked quaint with a nice patio (they didn't have their liquor license yet, but should have it now). The weather was nice so we thought we would give it a try. The owner very enthusiastically went over the menu with us. It was early so were were the only patrons there. He is certainly proud of the place and the food his chef is creating. We had the feta, a grilled cheese which was soft (not halumi), grilled and chopped eggplant salad, roasted beets, which came with a potato/garlic sauce, and finally an order of tzatziki (more about this later). The owner came over and chatted with us a bit before our food came. He is a Greek restaurant veteran. He told us how everything is made in house (except for the imported feta and yogurt). The chef makes the gyro every day. Grilled chicken is thigh instead of breast. I asked him about the tzatziki, and he enthusiastically told us how the chef starts with cucumbers, seeds them, grates them, then squeezes all liquid from them. He was so proud, while we didn't originally order it, but we had to and we were glad we did. It was thick and tasty. My favorite dish was the eggplant spread which was packed with flavor, but everything really was good. They don't serve the dips with pita here, but rather a crusty bread which gets some char from the grill (our Greek friends told us later that this is common on the islands). Everything was great and I need to get back to try the meat. One warning--as the owner told us, if you are going with a date, you both need to eat because the food is packed with garlic (vampires beware!). This was no joke, as I am pretty sure my pores were oozing it for a while after the meal!
  15. A non-foodie friend suggested Lucy Ethiopian Restaurant for dinner last weekend and we came away quite impressed. +1 ordered the Girgiro, the chef's own creation that came out on a "fire plate" - very tasty and tender and very generously portioned. I ordered the Gurage kitfo rare and it was excellent - nicely warmed with lots of flavor and generously portioned. We sampled a bit of the lamb tibs and vegan platters ordered by others - they were pretty good for what they are but not nearly as good as the Girgiro or Gurage kitfo. The injera was good and they also serve a good kocho (a chewy thicker flatbread that's served in wedges, which is also available at Enat). The service can be a bit slow and erratic at times in the busy restaurant, but it's actually quite nice and attentive for an Ethiopian restaurant. The menu is quite extensive, so there's a more here to lure us back.
  16. Our own oliveDC (Metrocurean) is reporting on her blog that Mendocino Grille and Sonoma's owners are planning a Bethesda outpost for spring of 2008, to be called Pacific. It will have a wine bar like Sonoma and offer breakfast and a small gourmet market. Griz Dwight of Grizform Design, who designed Black's Bar and Kitchen and PS 7 is the designer.
  17. Anil Kumar is now at Bethesda Curry Kitchen, right across the street from Grapeseed, which opened on Tuesday, February 11th. On this very cold evening, the nearly empty restaurant seemed like an eternity away from Gringos & Mariachis, just a few blocks down Cordell Avenue, and which also opened on February 11th. I have no doubt that on this evening, Gringos & Mariachis was packed. A liquor license is still a few weeks away, so for now, this restaurant is without alcohol. I started my dinner with a homemade Mango Lassi ($3.50) which reminded me that Kumar's former restaurant, Saveur India, had some of the best Kulfi I've ever tried - Bethesda Curry Kitchen also has homemade Kulfi on their dessert menu. Chef Kumar is from Hyderabad, a huge city in the South of India, and the south is very well-represented on the menu. The city of Coorg sits about 400 miles southwest of Hyderabad, nestled in the Western Ghats. When I go to India for the first time, my plan is to spend some time in Goa, but a detour to Coorg is also on the agenda. Coorgi Chicken ($15.99) isn't a dish you see very often in the DC area, but it was very well-executed here, and obviously long-cooked, containing 5-6 boneless, Halal thighs in a wonderful curry (the quality of this chicken was very high). Served with basmati rice, I also got a Mehti Paratha ($3.00) for the requisite sauce dunking. On a frigid Saturday night, there was only one other family of four dining in this somewhat stark, utilitarian restaurant. "Until you get your liquor license, weekend dinners during the winter are going to break your heart," I said to my server. I cannot think of an atmosphere that's more different from Gringos & Mariachis than Bethesda Curry Kitchen, but both restaurants are initialized in Italic in the Dining Guide which speaks volumes about the potential quality of cooking here. Also just down Cordell Avenue from Passage To India, I don't even see the two as competitors - one is a curry house; the other is fine dining. Bethesda Curry Kitchen is going to survive, not by weekend dinners, but by delivery and lunch buffets. I walked past the empty buffet - which had the signs up - and noticed that my Coorgi Chicken was on it, so you can enjoy this exact same dish for lunch, with many others to accompany it, for less money. In fact, until they get their liquor license, a lunch buffet would be the perfect way to initiate yourselves with this fine newcomer.
  18. In business more than 30 years, Georgetown Bagelry is the best bagel provider in the greater DC area imho. They boil, which eliminates most of the chains and others around from real competition. Beyond that, the flour, technique and ingredients they use all reflect a business serious about creating a high quality, authentic product. Finally, Georgetown Bagelry (though not in Georgetown) is a small local business with good people and values. They deserve lots and lots of support.
  19. Haandi in Bethesda is now Kadhai. Interesting...this is from Robert Dyer on his excellent Bethesda blog. http://robertdyer.blogspot.com/2013/05/haandi-changes-name-to-kadhai-in.html The gist is, Haandi in Bethesda changed its name...don't know if it's with the same owner/management or not. If you look at Haandi's web site is says the Bethesda location is permanently closed. The other location seems unaffected. There are a bunch of new menu items as well.
  20. Foong Li is not great, but it isn't nauseating. We've been all over the menu at Foong Li, trying the familiar and the not-so-familar and while we have had dishes we didn't like, none were as bad as those at HEOTB. Are you telling me that we shouldn't order spicy shrimp wonton (and if so, why?) or that they are supposed to served in a greasy glop? Are you telling me that a dish that is supposed to have ginger and scallions, but has no ginger is the fault of the Westerner who ordered? Maybe I am supposed to know that authentic Chinese ginger is flavorless? Sorry - I really think this was bad cooking, not bad choosing.
  21. (The Google couldn't find an individual thread about this place, just a couple of posts in Dining In Bethesda) I've only been to Bistro LaZeez for lunch, and found the food pretty good, with a couple of exceptions. The chicken sandwiches can be a little dry, so ask for extra sauce. Their felafel sandwich is my favorite: cruchy felafel with plenty of tahini, and lots of delicious slices of pickled turnip. Mazzas have been tasty, but IMO the hummus is better at Lebanese Taverna so get the Baba Ghanouj instead. Lentil soup was disappointing, consisting of just a few lentils floating in a thin, sour broth. Grilled chicken is very tasty. It's a cute little place, service is pleasant, and the owner is very nice.
  22. Walked by at lunch and saw the Now Open sign out front. Turns out it was their opening day. Hope springs eternal when it comes to Bethesda delis, so I decided to give it a shot. It's pretty bare bones space, with a handful of tables inside and an outdoor space with a few plastic tables. But delis don't need to be fancy if the food is good. There the news is somewhat hopeful. The matzo ball soup is solid, with a big fluffy ball and broth that could have been a bit more flavorful but overall was very nice. My litmus test for delis is pastrami. Heckman's is solidly in the thick-cut pastrami camp and the good news is that it's undeniably juicy and well-balanced. But it's also uncomfortably fatty -- not the unctuous kind of fat that melts in your mouth but the kind that makes the sandwich hard to eat when it's stacked high. I ended up trimming some of the fat myself and then enjoyed the sandwich. Surprisingly, they didn't have pickles, which at a deli is unfathomable but presumably will be rectified soon. Service was somewhat confused, which is not surprising on day one. To be fair to the wait staff, I think the problems largely originated in the kitchen. Overall, I'm somewhat more hopeful than some of the other delis that have come and gone in Bethesda.
×
×
  • Create New...