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Found 66 results

  1. La Fromagerie is a new cheese shop that will be opening soon in Old Town (corner of King and Payne Streets). From the website, it looks like the focus will be on American products. Anybody have any additional details?
  2. Chef Monnier comes from the late Arômes, and his latest venture brings his take on seasonal French bistro fare to the heart of Baltimore. I'm mostly a skeptic of Restaurant Week, but the dinner I had here last week was a tantalizing taste of what Chez Hugo offers. I started with a refreshing tomato gazpacho which was the right balance of sweet and tart, and paired nicely with a very good order of gougères. Next was a lamb murguez sausage, which was fantastic - tender, juicy, and spicy, with that unmistakable lamb flavor. This came on a bed of couscous with parsley, golden raisins, and a harissa yogurt sauce, unadventurous but a good complement to the sausage. Dessert was a poached peach on a sweet biscuit with vanilla ice cream which was just OK. Tastes of my companions dishes were mixed as well. The escargot appetizer and monkfish entree were very fresh, but a little too clean-tasting and could have used more aggressive seasoning. The steak frites and accompanying green peppercorn sauce were perfect, however. Overall, for a Restaurant Week meal I thought Chez Hugo did a good job of balancing a creative and affordable menu, and there were enough strong components that I'd like to come back to try them at their best.
  3. Silly website aside, I wonder if will be in the same league as his Provence, which was brilliant. Mashed potatoes with a ladle of rosemary-infused olive oil where the gravy goes....mmmmmmmmmmmm
  4. Cafe Tatti is a charming and quaint French Bistro located in a shopping center near Balducci's in McLean. I called around 2:30pm for a 6:30pm reservation on Monday night, and had no problem securing a table (not that I thought I would). When we arrived, we were seated at a two-top by the front window, a prime location, and the manager explained to me that they have a regular named Phillip, this is his table, and they weren't sure if the table was for him or not so they reserved it, and are glad to see it taken by another Phil. It was a nice, funny story (for which I'm not doing any justice) and a good introduction to the restaurant. Again, the restaurant is charming and quaint, with tiled archways, ceramics on the walls, other various artwork including many versions of a rooster which is the restaurants icon (of sorts), tablecloths and candles on the tables, formally attired wait staff. It describes itself as a French Bistro, but it has quite a few "Mediterranean" components to it as well. The staff, from top to bottom, provided excellent service throughout the meal (e.g. thoughtful suggestions, multiple unsolicited water refills, bread refills, checks on quality and taste, etc.). Prior to receiving our check, the manager came over with two (unasked for) shots of Amaretto (iirc), noting that on such a dreary day/evening (it had been raining all day and all night), a small digestif is the only response. It was very nice. Service started off with a small baguette, served warm, and was quite good. We ordered two glasses of the house Bordeaux, and were rewarded with hefty pours. For an appetizer, we had the Mussels Provencale, which was listed as a special that evening. We expected a pot of mussels that we'd have to work through, but instead were given a plate of mussels served open-faced (if you will) with the Provencale sauce added on top. I rather liked this presentation (much less fuss!), and the tomato sauce (tomatoes, chopped onion, garlic, among other ingredients) was very tasty. It wasn't ideal for bread-dipping, but we found a way. It was an ample portion split among two people. Entrees come with a Caesar salad (here, and example of the Mediterranean influence), amply and tastily dressed, topped by fresh ground pepper (if desired). For mains, we both got the Filet Au Poivre, which came with a side of roasted carrots and potatoes (these aren't mixed together). The steak was a large portion (the online menu says 7oz, which is probably accurate), and the gravy was delicious (with plenty for bread-dipping!). I didn't leave a bite. We got a slice of coconut cake and a slice of chocolate cake to go, and they were the only misses. I don't think these were made in-house, which is probably why. The cost was very reasonable, even considering we ordered wines by the glass (cheaper by the half liter or bottle), and both got the most expensive menu item. We look forward to retuning.
  5. From: The List, Are You On It. Christophe Poteaux, currently Executive Chef / Food & Beverage Director for Aquarelle at The Watergate, will open this new restaurant in Old Town Alexandria by September, featuring a moderately priced, modern French/Mediterranean cuisine with a blend of world ingredients. So does anyone know where and when this is going to open?
  6. So it seems Bonaroti might be getting something other than a Potbelly within skipping distance of it. I noticed this place taking over what used to be the storefront/restaurant of Wolftrap Catering, and it seems to have a nice concept in mind - even if the location might be lethal: Clarity Vienna Facebook Page @clarityvienna on Twitter The pedigree is certainly something to raise an eyebrow at, being owned by Jonathan Krinn, formerly of the 2941 Restaurant, and Jason Maddens, formerly of the Central Michel Richard in DC. Just from looks alone this appears to be something different from a simple Maple Ave. Restaurant clone, but there's no information on the menu or cuisine past guessing what a 'freestyle American bistro' would serve. Also, no one's posted about it yet from what I can see, so I figured I'd get the ball rolling.
  7. I just had brunch at BRX, an American Bistro in Great Falls, VA (www.brxgf.com/). Having eaten here for lunch and dinner, sadly I had overlooked this local establishment for brunch. This place is nestled in the small shopping center along Route 193 (Georgetown Pike) and Leesburg Pike (Route 7) at the traffic light. They are locally owned and have an excellent menu and specials weekly. Brunch was excellent - all their food is made to order and from various eggs benedicts to pancakes, crepes or omelettes you cannot miss. Because they are situated in the corner of the plaza you have to look for it. The decor is nice and the bar area separated by glass from the main dining area. When the weather is nice, you can be seated outside. The staff is accommodating and the owner is often visible and interactive making sure your experience is to your liking. The have a great wine selection as you will observe when you enter there is a wine locker area that appears well utilized. If you are looking for a nice, consistent locally-owned restaurant with comfortable atmosphere, check it out.
  8. Northern Virginia magazine reported that Cassatt's owner Art Hauptman opened the market portion of Bistro 360 on Oct. 17 in Cafe Assorti's former location. Although Northern Virginia magazine states that "Hauptman hopes to have the restaurant and wine bar of Bistro 360 open late next week," the Bistro 360 website says that the Bistro360 Eatery will open on Nov. 3 and the wine bar and market are now open.
  9. It took some digging, but I independently confirmed that L'Hommage Bistro will be opening at 450 K Street NW, just east of Mount Vernon Square. The Chef de Cuisine will be Josh Perkins, who was most recently at Ecco in Atlanta - he has 25 years of experience in the industry. The Mâitre d' is named Mustafa Fairtout (I'm not sure about the spelling of Mustafa's last name), who was a Server at Cafe Milano. This will be a classical French bistro with onion soup, páté, steak frites, etc. The restaurant will seat 175 with 50 at the bar and 80 on the patio. Owner is Hakan Ilhan of Al Dente et al. A bakery will be attached to the bistro, selling French breads, sandwiches, coffee, and to-go meals - the bread will be made in-house. --- I was also sent this article: "Alba Osteria Owner Hakan Ilhan to Open French Restaurant in Mount Vernon Triangle" by Rebecca Cooper on bizjournals.com
  10. I eat here with some regularity and keep coming back because they do all the standards well, have an experienced and friendly staff, good parking, a very good wine list and reasonable prices. A good choice for a bustling neighborhood bistro. The table under the stairs is a nice, quiet private spot.
  11. Name certainly doesn't bring me visions of moules-frites...more visions of a certain barber and a bakery shop .
  12. The Guards became Rialto which is now Maxime, under the same ownership as Rialto (via Washington City Paper). Maxine opened on March 26, 2015 (via Washingtonian).
  13. Just an fyi, I wrote this up for BYT, but a new french-inspired place is opening on 9th Street. Here's a first look. "Brought to us by Phil Rodriguez and Joey Belcher, of Sticky Rice on H Street, and Mick Mier and Joe Steger the design team responsible for Science Club, Napoleon and Sesto Senso, 1905 will offer French-inspired bistro fare. They hope 1905 will be a cozy addition to the neighborhood. The kind of place you want to eat, hang out, drink some wine, then come back the next night and do it again."
  14. No thread for Chez Billy in Petworth? Ok, I'll go. A friend had been talking this place up late last year, so I wasn't too surprised when my SIL gave us a gift certificate here for Christmas (she lives in NYC, and asked my friend for recommendations). Were there other places I'd rather have been given a GC to in the city? Probably. But, I was also glad to have an excuse to try out Chez Billy. We went on a Sunday night, and the restaurant was never crowded, although the bar had a number of folks. The bar room is actually the more interesting of the two with its high ceilings, but the other room was nice and cozy for a winter night. It was a bit darker than I would like, but maybe I'm just getting old. Service was good. Nothing outstanding, but nothing bad. We started with Tartine Aux Champignons ($12 Sauteed wild mushrooms, grilled country bread, sherry vinegar, duck egg) and Soupe A L'oignon Gratinee Lyonnaise ($10 Classic onion soup), both of which were good. For some reason I was thinking the tartine would be more tart-like, when in fact it was just as described - a piece of grilled bread in a bowl, topped with mushrooms and a duck egg. It was good, but I think I was still thrown off by my own wrong expectations. The soup was excellent. So many times I have trouble with French onion soup cutting through the cheese and bread and eating it in a dignified manner. This was rich and cheesy, but very manageable. Our mains were Confit De Canard ($23 Pommes"Πde terre sarladaise, shitake mushrooms, garlic spinach, roasted duck jus) and Jarret De Porc ($24 Cider braised duroc pork shank, white beans, local kale, bacon). Both meats were falling off the bone, as expected, and both were very good. The pork shank was enormous, and I enjoyed the bean, kale, and bacon swimming underneath. Great wintery dishes on a cold evening. We ended with Plat De Fromage ($8 Walnut raisin toast, wildflower honey), which included a goat, a sheep, and a cow blue (I had been craving a blue cheese that day), and all three were delicious. Although I love walnut raisin toast, I wished there had been a more "plain" bread or cracker or something to let the flavors of the cheese shine through. All in all we really enjoyed our meal and would definitely recommend. I don't know if I'd drive across town, but if you're in the area, it's worth a stop. We even got parking right out front! Beats heading downtown.
  15. Quench has been open a few months now and I finally got the chance to enjoy it. The pedigree is there with personnel links to Bucks F&C, Volt, Black's and others. The menu is clean and appealing and there's a strong focus on mixology. The space is pretty much an open single room with a bar centered along the back wall and tables along the sides and front. So why in Rockville? I'd say they're swimming against the tide here, given how the MoCo rules around bars work. Don't get me wrong though - I'm glad they're here and I hope to support the effort as it is worth it. I'd swear the MoCo rules make it so the only way a bar can survive is to sell burgers and 2lbs of fries with it - a la Greene Turtle, Applebees, TGI Fridays, etc, etc. Quench is NOT that. They're right across from Cava. That's nice and maybe together they'll turn that little area into a better-than-average restaurant/bar desitination place. Maybe they already have. I enjoyed brunch, where I had a perfectly cooked omlette (I'm picky about that) with apples and bacon, with a simple side arugala salad with small, sharp bits of shaved reggiano (or parm, I'm never quite sure.) You can see the influences: my favorite breakfast ever was at Black's Bistro, where the eggs were the best I've ever had. The menu looks like and includes things seen at Voltaggio's places, such as deviled eggs. The service was good/efficient and the folks I spoke with were very nice. They are all-in with neighborhood involvement, social media, etc. It may take that kind of effort to overcome the tendancy to have the bar be the star and then MoCo brings it down. But if they can do it like Cava, where the food is excellent AND the bar is hopping, then they should do just fine and are a welcome addition to the area.
  16. And as I said in response - it's easier to drink and laugh with friends when someone will bring you the drink in the first place.
  17. To kick off our week of dining out (my vacation), last Sunday we tried Bistro L'hermitage, technically in Woodbridge, but close enough to Occoquan to be considered part of that area. Halfway through our brunch we were already talking about a return visit. The restaurant is beautiful, and very much what I think of as a French country bistro (in my imagination, at least). We were greeted graciously, and service throughout the meal was attentive and professional. I ordered the hanger steak, medium rare, and egg, sunny side up. Both were perfectly cooked and delicious. The mixed greens salad was coated with a delicious vinaigrette, and the fried potatoes were crisp on the outside and soft inside, tasting like . . . potatoes. I loved every bite of everything on my plate. WW thoroughly enjoyed his grilled chicken Reuben with warm potato salad. The potato salad was lightly dressed with a mustard vinaigrette, and the taste I got was a perfect balance of acid and potatoes. I couldn't taste his sandwich, but he declared it wonderful. The menu is filled with tempting offerings, and if all of the cooking is as careful and skillful as it was at our brunch, this is going to be one of our favorites--and we only have to cross the Occoquan to get there!
  18. Le Marais has a few branches in San Francisco. We had brunch at the Castro location today given that we live in the neighborhood. Croissant. On par with the ones at Tartine. A bonus is that the staff at Le Marais has ZERO attitude which practically ensures that we'll be back. Butter and jam. The jam was nothing to write home about however. Their hot chocolate was basically a cup of steamed cream with a shot of cocoa. Oh well, can't get everything right all the time I suppose. Croque monsieur with ham and gruyère, small salad. Unlike at other places we've been to so far, Le Marais uses brioche instead of croissants for their croques. Vinaigrette had a touch too much mustard and acid. Duck confit with roasted potatoes, mushrooms and small salad. Same issue with the vinaigrette here as above. Plate was otherwise perfect. Le Marais 498 Sanchez (18th Street) The Castro
  19. I prefer to let the pictures speak for themselves. It's one of my favorite places to eat at in NYC although sometimes I do wish the aura of preciousness could be dispensed with. Buvette 42 Grove Street (Bleecker Street) Greenwich Village
  20. We went tonight and had an excellent meal. Both chef/partners Claudio Pirollo and Mickael Cornu were there on Sunday night! Great pate, super mussels and a delicious gratin of prosciutto wrapped endive for starts. The rib-eye steaks were perfectly done. Charming service made the evening thouroughly enjoyable.
  21. ARLnow.com is reporting a new "gastropub" (I hate that term) named The Green Pig Bistro is coming to this space.
  22. The French Hound serves lunch on Saturday. It's a great little spot. http://www.thefrenchhound.com/
  23. 2 Park Avenue (32nd Street), New York, NY 10016 Phone: (212) 725-8585 Web: http://www.artisanalbistro.com/ Menus: http://www.artisanal...menus_index.php For years, Artisanal has been my go-to lunch spot anytime I'm near Penn Station or Grand Central, though it's a bit of a hike from both. It's not a cheap lunch, but it has good food and wines by the glass. On my visit last Friday, I sat at the bar and started with six "East Coast" oysters (no place of origin was indicated on the menu or when they arrived) ($18) and a Hugel Reisling from Alsace ($14). The oysters were big and nicely briney, but served with a Mignonette that was basically red wine vinegar. This isn't typical and, regardless, a good oyster is a good oyster. I also ordered The Big Cheese, a killer grilled cheese with Fontina, Tellegio, Gruyere, and Emmenthaler ($15.50), to which I added tomato ($1.50) and bacon ($2.00), and subbed an under dressed green salad for the standard chips. Add another Hugel and the bill was $71 for a big lunch, which admittedly wasn't their finest effort (an anomaly, but still an enjoyable meal). Steep, yes, but you could stick to the sandwich itself or the excellent burger and leave for much less.
  24. Drove by the Cabin John market strip center on Mac Arthur Blvd. What was once a pizza hut take out space and then an italian/ice cream concept connected to the Cabin John Market how has a sign for the Wild Tomato. Searching on the web, it look like a concept from the owners of Persimmon in Bethesda. Interesting location but gets me excited given the lack of choices in Potomac Village. With this, Burger Joint in Cabin John Mall and Founding Farmers coming to Park Potomac, perhaps things are turning around for Potomac in terms of dining choices. See Wild Tomato
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