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Found 25 results

  1. Joe Cocker's passing reminded me of this version of Dylan's "Just Like a Woman". This is such a soul full rendition: Always liked it. ...and come to think of it...a beautiful sexy version by Roberta Flack jeez I like that song!!!
  2. Too many people think "Motherless Children" debuted on "461 Ocean Boulevard" when it didn't happen that way at all. The great Willie Johnson (I loathe to call him "Blind" Willie Johnson, but yes, he was blind) introduced this song in 1927. This is how the song was supposed to sound:
  3. Steve Hackett is a rather underrated guitarist. Enjoy. From 'Foxtrot' - 'Horizons' From 'Nursery Chryme' - 'Return of the Giant Hogweed' From 'Voyage of the Acolyte' - Hackett's masterpiece 'Shadow of the Hierophant' From another solo work 'Spectral Mornings'. Perhaps one of his most singular iconic pieces he's ever written.
  4. Okay, who was lucky enough to see the legendary Danny Gatton play live? His reputation is not just local - my Lyft driver in LA not only knew who he was, but put on a recording of Gatton playing after getting *very* excited that I mentioned his name. "Danny Gatton: World's Greatest Unknown Guitarist" by Phil Harrell on npr.org Tom Principato talks about Danny Gatton (I've seen Tom Principato play - he's no Danny Gatton, but I *love* his sound and stage presence). "The Humbler" is a documentary about Danny Gatton in the works. IndieGoGo page. "New Film Reveals Mastery, Tragedy, of D.C. Guitar Hero Danny Gatton" by Neil Augenstein on wtop.com You can just tell by the way Gatton *perfectly* imitates Chet Atkins - with a super-clean base line accompanying the upper register in two distinct voices - without even trying, that this guy had licks coming out every pore of his body.
  5. "Guitarist J. Geils Dead at 71" by Jon Blistein on rollingstone.com "Musician John Warren Geils, Jr., Founder of the J. Geils Band, Dies at Massachusetts Home at Age 71" on abcnews.go.com
  6. A friend, who is always mining for gems musically speaking, turned me on to Ted Hawkins several years ago. I only have one of his recordings. "The Next Hundred Years" is well worth checking out. His voice is somehow warm and sweet yet hardened and haunting. There's definitely a bluesy aspect to his music, but also a lot of folk and soul. I can't really think of anyone quite like him. He was a busker at heart; always reluctant to record his music. One of my favorite tunes is "Strange Conversation": I had a strange conversation My baby called me on the phone She said that your next lover's gonna be the blues And now I'm gonna be gone I like his take on Credence Clearwater Revival's "Long As I Can See The Light": Enjoy!
  7. I love Big Maybelle. I used to have a two-LP compilation of her work that was fantastic. I haven't heard it in probably 20 years (or more), but I recognize this track from it. Thanks for posting it. I must confess I don't remember ever hearing of Sid Wyche, so thanks for your research. Turns out he co-wrote the widely recorded standard "Well all right, okay, you win" and also the mischievous (to put it mildly) "(I Love to Play Your Piano) Baby Let Me Bang Your Box", first released by The Toppers in 1954:
  8. This is a great, not-very-well-known blues number with some great recordings. Here are Nina Simone, Sarah Vaughan, and Dakota Staton.
  9. Her live album from the Monterey jazz fest is also excellent. Truly a great artist.
  10. I preferred it on first listening, but after listening to Fuller's version (by itself - you can't listen to them side-by-side) a couple times, he's starting to win me over. Just the thought of him playing in some rinky-dink "hall," with 30 people standing around him in a circle, clapping the beat while he's puffing out notes on his kazoo (probably with a cigarette hanging out the corner of his mouth) - that's just a great visual.
  11. Known variously as Look on Yonder's Wall, Look over Yonder Wall. Which of these is greater than another?
  12. Alberta Hunter was a wonderful jazz and blues singer in the 1910s to 1940s who had, like many black performing artists, more success in Europe than in the US. She made quite a lot of recordings. This one, "You Can't Tell the Difference After Dark," was recorded in 1935 but not released commercially at the time. It surfaced on the compilation of naughty blues and jazz recordings called "Copulatin' Blues," which was released some time in the 1980s and is available today on CD: This song was broadly suggestive, as were many of the recordings on the compilation. Others were downright filthy, and I encourage you to go out and find them. In the 1950s, Hunter abandoned her singing career and embarked on a career as a nurse. In the mid-1970s she re-emerged, in her 80s, recording the soundtrack for the offbeat Alan Rudolph film "Remember My Name," whose title song she wrote. (The movie starred Tony Perkins, Geraldine Chaplin, and Alfre Woodard, with whom I had gone to acting school.) She had an engagement of several years at a Greenwich Village club called The Cookery, where I caught her act sometime in 1977 or 1978. She sang one of her signature tunes, "My Castle's Rockin'," which she sings in this recording from a few years later: Here's a recording of the same song that I imagine she made in the 1930s: I loved her.
  13. One of the greatest and most influential electric guitar-players in the history of electric guitar, his live performances were, well, electrifying: I had the enormous pleasure of catching Freddie King live at the old Jazz Workshop on Boylston Street in Boston, probably about a year after this recording, and man that cat could wail. He had this way of throwing in some really surprising, flawless lick, and then he'd look out at the audience with a sly grin. His set that night was one of the high points of my life. He really tore the house down:
  14. Okay, one more 20th-century chanteuse, Sarah Vaughan, who had one of the great voices of the century, which can be mentioned in the same breath with, say, Janet Baker. Here she is in 1954, with the phenomenal horn player Clifford Brown, singing "It's Crazy":
  15. While I love Ella Fitzgerald, and have mentioned elsewhere the pleasure I had in hearing her in concert long ago at Symphony Hall in Boston, she has never been one of my favorite singers, and I've never been a devotee of her cult. I think my biggest problem with Ella's singing is that in so many recordings, she seems to sing songs as if the words had no particular meaning. Not always, but often. There's no denying her mostly flawless vocal technique. My favorite album of hers is "Pure Ella", which you can find on YouTube. It's just Ella's voice and Ellis Larkins's piano; it was released in 1994, but was a combination of two LPs from the early 50s. Here is Ella from that album singing "I've Got a Crush on You."
  16. I notice there isn't a thread on one of the finest songwriters of the 20th century - Townes Van Zandt. Unlike some other "songwriter's songwriters," I always always prefer Townes' versions of his own songs over the covers. As the (also) great Steve Earle said, "Townes Van Zandt is the best songwriter in the whole world, and I'll stand on Bob Dylan's coffee table in my cowboy boots and say that." "Pancho and Lefty" "Waiting Around to Die" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDymc0CJ6pQ And my favorite of all time: "If I Needed You"
  17. Rarely have I seen a musician who put his heart and soul into every performance. The guy toured nearly 300 days a year into his seventies. RIP BB. Live at the Regal
  18. One of the greatest concert albums of all time, "The Johnny Otis Show Live at Monterey!", from the 1970 Monterey Jazz Festival, was once among the crown jewels of my LP collection. From that record, here is Esther Phillips, known in her early years as "Little Esther", with "Little Esther's Blues". She left us way too soon.
  19. Quite possibly the coolest person of the Twentieth Century. Jonah, 1946 That's All,1960 (?) Didn't It Rain, 1964 I came to Sister Rosetta by way of gospel music, and found myself in the middle of rock 'n' roll.
  20. I especially love Billie Holiday's late recordings for Verve. This recording of "April in Paris" from 1956 was included on the wonderful collection "Lady in Autumn: The Best of the Verve Years" released in 1991, which I strongly suggest anyone who cares for singing or for jazz or for Billie Holiday should have. I believe that's the great Ben Webster on tenor sax.
  21. I posted a link to Etta James singing "The Very Thought of You" from her beautiful "Mystery Lady" album over in the Carmen McRae thread. Here's another great track from the same album, "How Deep Is The Ocean." I totally love this album and can't say enough nice things about it: Here, on the other hand, is Etta James doing the kind of thing she was better known for, tearing up Otis Redding's "I Got The Will." I hate to use the word "apotheosis" again so soon, but if this ain't apotheosis, I don't know what is:
  22. As I mentioned in the Lee Wiley thread, Dinah Washington's recording of "Manhattan" (1960) includes an update to the Larry Hart original lyric from "Abie's Irish Rose" to "My Fair Lady" ("and for some high fare/we'll go to 'My Fair/ Lady', say"). In spite of the rather sappy orchestration and the extreme vibrato employed by the singer, I must admit that I adore this version of the song.
  23. The Allman Brothers Band closed out 45 years at 1:30 am this morning at the Beacon Theater in New York City. Fittingly on the 43rd anniversary of Duane Allman's death. Rolling Stone with the review Final set List: First Set "Little Martha" "Mountain Jam" "Don't Want You No More" "It's Not My Cross to Bear" "One Way Out" "Good Morning, Little Schoolgirl" "Midnight Rider" "The High Cost of Low Living" "Hot 'Lanta" "Blue Sky" "You Don't Love Me" Second Set "Statesboro Blues" "Ain't Wastin' Time No More" "Black Hearted Woman" "The Sky Is Crying" "Dreams" "Don't Keep Me Wondering" "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" (with drum solos) Third Set "Melissa" "Revival" "Southbound" "Mountain Jam" "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" "Mountain Jam (reprise)" Encores "Whipping Post" "Trouble No More"
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