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Found 8 results

  1. Great article about Sonny Liston: "Sonny Liston: The Mysterious Death that Haunts Boxing" on bbc.com
  2. Maybe I'm jaded, but even at 40-years-old, it seems virtually impossible that Floyd Mayweather could possibly lose to Conor McGregor in a boxing match, which is to take place tomorrow night. I have little doubt that in a street fight, McGregor - at age 29 - would destroy Mayweather, but in a boxing match where you can't kick? No way - it's a completely different skill set, from how you square off against your opponent, to the distance between the fighters, to, well, to just about everything. This is not unlike the world racquetball champion trying to beat Roger Federer in tennis. It would be *so* much more interesting if it was just a no-holds-barred fight, but Mayweather would *never* agree to that; on the other hand, McGregor is receiving an unprecedented payday for a mixed martial artist, so I'm sure he'll be just fine with being knocked out in the fourth round, given that he'll be making about $100 million from this. Hell, I'd fight Mike Tyson in his prime for $100 million. Granted, about 1% of that would go towards my medical expenses, but it would be worth it. By the way, pay-per-view is $99! It would be *hilarious* if McGregor said, "To hell with it," and kicked Mayweather in the nuts.
  3. Muhammad Ali is in the hospital now with a respiratory ailment (he's going to be released soon), but that reminds me that we don't have a thread for the person who just might be the most famous athlete who ever lived. I've always felt badly for Joe Frazier, because he didn't get the accolades that Ali did, but most of Ali's extra accolades came from what he did outside of the ring - he, himself, said that "Frazier was the greatest fighter of all times, next to me." Ali may not be immortal, but in a sense, he is - people will be talking about him 500 years from now, and that's as close to immortality as you can come. "Muhummad Ali vs. Sonny Liston (1965) - A Look Back 50 Years Later" And for a taste of what it must have been like to fight Ali in his prime, scroll down to the bottom of the first post in "Requiem for a Heavyweight (1956)" and click on the scene from the 1962 film.
  4. The painting I refer to above is here: "Jack Johnson, World's First Black Boxing Champion, was Jailed Under Jim Crow. Will He Get a Posthumous Pardon?" by Sarah Kaplan on washingtonpost.com Please read the above story. My contention is based on these simple three words: "It's about race." If you buy that, please keep reading in earnest; if you don't, I value and welcome your differing opinions. Jack Johnson was the child of former slaves, and rose to become the world's first black Heavyweight Boxing Champion. The article goes into sufficient detail about his life where I don't need to (I absolutely *love* the story of him giving the officer a $100 bill - it's great!) There is no question in *my* mind that, yes, "It's about race," and Jack Johnson should receive a full Presidential pardon. But. I believe that pardon needs to come from a white President, not President Obama. Before you launch into me, hear me out. If it's about race, what "good" does it do, in terms of advancing race relations, for a black President to pardon Jack Johnson? Yes, it would right a wrong on an individual level, and yes, black people have every right to say, "We don't *want* help from white people." I understand and agree with both of those sentiments. But for the mending between our races to move forward, we need to have a white person (I fell into the trap of typing "white man" before correcting myself) pardon Mr. Johnson for reasons that are, in my eyes, obvious. No white people would be able to accuse "some black President of taking care of one of his own"; they'd be forced to come to terms with reality, although I can easily see some residual racists claiming that "it's a liberal that dun' it." This has nothing to do with liberal or conservative, but it *does* have to do with race. A very credible, logical argument can also be made that the real issue is that it has less to do with race than it does the most basic tenet of all: "right vs. wrong," and I have no logical argument against that (nor would I *want* to argue against that). So, without getting long-winded, if President Obama doesn't pardon Jack Johnson, I propose that our next President does, and everything and everyone (society, race relations, black people, white people, Mr. Johnson's descendents, and most importantly, Mr. Johnson's Legacy) will benefit the most from his pardon being issued by a white President; my only sadness is that he wouldn't be around to see it, but most great recognitions in this world occur posthumously.
  5. "Ronda Rousey Stunned in 2nd Round by Holly Holm at UFC 193" on cbsnews.com This is interesting: "Holly Holm: 'Ronda Rousey was in Unfamiliar Territory When She Finally Got Hit'" by Damon Martin on foxsports.com (I know some people on here don't like fighting, but I find combat sports to have a purity to them that only a few others, such as running, have - there's no equipment, there are no balls (especially in the women's division); it's just human vs. human, and as primal as can be - I suspect it's the oldest sport in the world. If it wasn't for people getting permanently injured, I would *love* ultimate fighting, but unfortunately, that's just not how it works. So yeah, I understand perfectly well how people can despise this sport.)
  6. Today is the 40th anniversary of one of the biggest sporting events in the history of the world of professional sports, The Thrilla in Manilla, or the third fight and rubber match of the epic boxing matches between Mohammed Ali and Joe_Frazier, The Thrilla in Manilla. It was far bigger than a sporting event, as Mohammed Ali, the world's most famous athlete, an entertainer, a "poet", and an amazing promoter in his own right, moved this fight into a sociological battle. The fight itself was brutal. These two extraordinary boxers had three epic battles spread over 1/2 a decade. It was personal human warfare. It was extraordinary. Here is a short summary video of the epic battle and the build up: There are full videos of this fourteen round brawl and epic battle between two valiant, very evenly matched boxers of different styles....but I think this summary gives a sense of the event.
  7. I have to get this post in before the fight starts! "Floyd Mayweather: By The Numbers" by Kurt Badenhausen on forbes.com (Given that each fighter is going to be making *over $100 million*, it seems appropriate to put the Forbes link first.) "Mayweather vs. Pacquiao: Fight Night in Las Vegas" on latimes.com "Evander Holyfield Speaks on Mayweather-Pacquiao and Why American Youth Boxing is Dying" by Nate Scott on ftwusatoday.com
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