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Found 7 results

  1. Looking around more, I think it's covered generally under Baltimore and Annapolis -- found recommendations for a couple places (Bartlett Pear Inn in Easton, Bistro Poplar in Cambridge), though not centralized. But that helps a lot. The restaurant on the dock that we went to last time was Palm Beach Willie's -- not a name that inspired confidence, but it was terrific, very local, very fresh, very homey. They were hit by a huge party that arrived a few minutes before us, so it took quite a while, but it was well worth the wait. Some kind of sweet potato side was wonderful, too (can't recall the specifics). --- [The following posts have been split into their own threads: Bistro Poplar (rorkin)]
  2. I was at Bob Kinkead's and his brother collaboration joint in Boston, Sibling Rivalry. A big disappointment. We had raw oysters, tuna tartare, foie gras and beef tenderloin. Middle of eating our "skinny" oysters, my husband bit into the most FOUL smelling oyster. My 1/2 dozen were okay but the mignonette sauce with sesame oil? a big faux pas...sesame oil overpowered the taste of the oysters so much that I just had mine without any. The tuna and foie gras were above average...nothing spectacular but no disappointments. The beef tenderloin came out medium when we ordered rare...The restaurant offered to take the oysters and steak off our bill...which was graceful of them. But don't restaurants get it???? It's not the free meal I am looking for. I will pay for quality. Bob Kinkead should not be opening up restaurants with his name if he is not capable of ensuring the quality!! To Bob's credit, his wine list was excellent. We ordered a New Zealand Savignon Blanc (name, which I forget) and a Cab from Kelman Vineyards.
  3. Chestertown Have a non food-related event to attend this weekend in Chestertown, MD and wondered whether anyone has any good haunts out there....I suspect that most people heading to the Eastern Shore from the DC region, when asked about great food or restaurant recommendations, would recommend Cantler's or Mike's or another Annapolis/Kent Island area hangout. Since we're only traveling from Annapolis to Chestertown, not very far really, I thought it would be nice to grab a bite out there and make an afternoon of it. Anyone have any good recommendations in town? Thanks!
  4. It's DC, y'all. There have to be other Harvardians in the dr.com ranks? Class of 2000 here, but I started as 2001. Since 2000 asks me for money and 2001 doesn't, it's clear they've adopted me. I don't encounter many alums in Carlisle PA these days. And I should have made the thread title Harvard College, or included Radcliffe, or yadda yadda yadda ... I know, I know. Lowell House, lit concentrator, HRG&SP and HRDC. You??
  5. What to do when you have an empty weekend this Spring? Explore the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, a 125-mile-long scenic driving tour which begins about 80 miles east of Washington, DC. I could rewrite all the information about the tour, but it's all right here on the website: harriettubmanbyway,org, which contains all the information you need to know. If anyone is sifting through the website, and finds any interesting nuggets, please feel free to post them here, as I'm sure certain things deserve to be highlighted. One thing this website can do is to suggest places to eat along the way, which can be our way of giving some value-added information not otherwise on the internet. If anyone knows of any restaurants and hotels near the route, please chime in, and if we get enough, I'll organize and order them so everyone can have a more pleasant trip.
  6. Please don't remember John Glenn only for his partisan politics - the man was, is, and always will be a great American Hero - just look at those tags in this thread, and there could have been more. I have total respect for this great American, and I hope everyone else does, too. Senator Glenn left us earlier today at the age of 95 - we lost a giant today: What a great man.
  7. Bistro Poplar is a French-inspired, new American spot emphasizing local seafood, produce and a strong kitchen. It has been open about 3 and a half years. Chef Ian Cambell is clearly part of a newer and very talented corps of locally centered chefs on the Eastern Shore having studied at CIA and worked with Andrew Evans at the Inn at Easton and Thomas Keller in Yountville. We headed here for dinner this weekend and really enjoyed it. Here's a short excerpt from the Bistro's own website: "Chef Campbell uses many local ingredients for the bistro's traditional recipes. Simple and hearty are good descriptions of bistro fare, and Bistro Poplar strives to remain true to these while providing attentive, yet unassuming service. The menu changes seasonally, with freshness and quality being the main focus." HEADLINE In a world where many restaurants claim all kinds of crazy things on their websites, the above excerpt is totally accurate. A very nice menu, expertly prepared with a couple interesting options. Fine dining but decent value at somewhat higher prices. Not a destination in the sense of prioritizing this if just in the area for a night or two (with what else is available in Easton and elsewhere) but a nice choice for variety if in the area for several days or more. Very friendly, efficient and attentive crew. VENUE Hadn't been in Cambridge much before but, without exploring it very thoroughly, it seems to be struggling a bit with the down economy; saw some vacant storefronts on the main drag, etc. That impression stands in some contrast to the fairly active harbor filled with various smaller yachts and cruising vessels. The drive from Easton is about 20-25 minutes south on 50. Bistro Poplar stands a bit in contrast (in a very positive, bright and enticing sort of way) to the rest of the street on which it's located. Maybe about 20-24 tables with a combination of free-standing tables and some booth type setups along the perimeter of the rectangular dining room. Clean design that doesn't really prompt specific attention but, rather, serves to not distract from the food and conversation and conveys simplicity with casual elegance. In short, dining room design very much mirrors the restaurant's philosophy and menu. SERVICE We got a short-notice table on a busy Saturday night thanks to our inn's help and Natalie's hospitality. From the instant we entered until we left, we were helped by 3 to 5 different people who were all very friendly and seemed genuinely enthusiastic about the Bistro and about serving guests. Staff (both front of house and kitchen) are a definite plus in BP's favor. As the excerpt above claims, the staff were very much attentive but not assuming but I'd also add very sincere and friendly. FOOD Everything was carefully prepared and presented with fresh ingredients. A few dishes surprised more than most of the others but there were no real disappointments and this is in keeping with the restaurant's focus. More specifically, we had: - A traditional Onion Soup Gratinee ($8): Classic preparation that maybe could have used a bit more salt or seasoning but overall was quite satisfying with sweet onions and gruyere. - Fried Green Tomatoes w/ Crab Hash and Beurre Monte ($16): Friends ordered this and I didn't try it but it was easy to tell this was a big hit. Visually, two large and thick tomato slices with crispy thin breading and ample portion of crab...remoulade... - Black Sea Bass w/ avocado, corn and tomato confit salad ($26): My SO and I both went for this since a local (Ocean City) fish. Very fresh and perfectly cooked. A minor quibble that the skin could have been a bit crispier but we both loved and finished this generously portioned (two full fillets over the chopped avocado, corn and tomato) dish. The tomato confit was rich, sweet and full of fresh flavor. - Atlantic Cod w/ curry risotto ($23): Simple preparation that looked fresh and good. Our friend who ordered this finished it happily. - Sea Scallops w/ Panzanella Salad ($28): Another friend ordered these and, suffice to say, these scallops were both very fresh and cooked well. Crispy exteriors and sweet and nicely cooked interiors. Nothing overly creative but genuinely enjoyable. Much better than a similar dish at Mason's in Easton I had the previous day. - Truffled Mac & Cheese Gratin ($5): Served straight-from-the-oven piping hot, this was delicious. Again not something so innovative but expertly done and very tasty. It didn't last long on the table between the two of us who shared it. - Sauteed Spinach w/ garlic side ($5): Like so many of the dishes, great ingredients allowed to shine without any obstructionism disguised as experimentation. My vegetable-loving SO enjoyed this. - Cappuccino ($4): I blew it to not ask what coffee they were using since they offered a full assortment of espressos and drip. Whatever the espresso roast was, it was good and full flavored. - Carmelized Peach Pie w/ creamy lavender sorbet ($9): After a full day of very good to great food on the Eastern Shore, we didn't have it in us to order desserts all around so we shared this one between 3 of us. Maybe one of the more interesting dishes but very successfully executed as everything else was. Fresh sweet seasonal peaches enclosed in a slightly sweet and browned (carmelized) pastry. I started wondering what the difference between ice cream and a "creamy sorbet" might be but that faded as I just really enjoyed the creamy sweet deliciousness floral overtones. Really nice dessert. - 2008 Trimbach Pinot Blanc ($38): Perfect pairing for the scallops and fish with nice crispness, minerality and fruit. About triple the retail price. VALUE We came in at just over $200 for 4 with the bottle of wine and pre tax and tip. I'm not sure how good or bad a price the wine was but, overall, this seemed very fair for what we had. This is a spot probably well positioned and priced for its community. Very good value. BOTTOM LINE A thoroughly enjoyable meal from a Chef and restaurant that actually is doing what they claim to do. This area (Easton, Cambridge, St Michaels, etc.) feels under-represented on dr.com and perhaps much improved from even a few years ago with several very good and worthwhile options for 'discriminating palates.' Surely Ian Cambell and Bistro Poplar are full members of this club. Go if in Cambridge or even make the 20-30 min drive if in the general area for more than a few days.
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