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Found 31 results

  1. Today, after discovering that Myanmar was locked and dark (I'm 0 for 2 on my lunch attempts this week), I remembered this post and set out to find Miu Kee. I ended up at Vinh Kee, on Route 50 at Graham Rd. (same shopping center as Pho 75, but facing 50). We started with steamed dumplings, and although the dough was kind of tough, the dumplings were tasty. I had shrimp with Chinese broccoli and my husband had shrimp with spicy salt. Both were so good my husband is already talking about going back.
  2. In a fit of hubris... I left the map at home figuring that I knew exactly where Fortune was and, having read the map quickly, could get us there. At the risk of alienating all northern Virginian's, we were stuck in Dante's 8th level of hell (reserved for those stupid enough to drive in Virginia on a Sunday, or during rush hour, or during not rush hour, or, say, any time except 3:25am and 3:27am on certain Tuesdays when there is actually only a small traffic jam at every light) we spent an hour getting from 495 to Bailey's crossroads. Wound up at Peking Gourmet, which isn't. Maybe tonight is a two negroni night as well. Ah well...
  3. Surprised no one has written up Da Hong Pao. Went for dim sum Saturday in short time we had between kid holiday season activities. Arrived right at 11:00 and there were about 8 tables open. Within about 20 minutes, every table seemed to be full ad 40 minutes, there was a sizable number of people waiting, though not as long as the lines at Oriental East in Silver Spring. The strength of Da Hong Pao is the variety. They have a lot of different things, rivaling some places in Chicago Chinatown, but not as many as the more extensive NYC Chinatown places. Definitely more than any place else I have been to in DMV. Had our usuals of siu mai, ha gao, yu choi, shrimp cheong fun, lo bak go, and stuffed tofu. The steamed dumplings were all well done. The lo bak go was disappointing in that it was stone cold. By the time it came, we had requested it, we were pretty full anyway, so we ate half and packed the rest to go, figuring we can microwave later. Stuffed tofu was interesting in that it was fried like Japanese agedashi tofu, with a crispy corn starch style crust. We also got fried shrimp balls which I enjoyed, but since the kids surprisingly did not like, I ate two and a half which get pretty heavy. Highlight for me was that they had the crispy roast pig. Got my week's animal fat intake, and am very happy for it. Finished with egg custard tarts for dessert which are nice and light and come as three small ones rather than two larger ones as most places seem to do. Service is generally pretty good and they are responsive with keeping tea filled. Carts that come around have mostly the steamed items, and the rest, you request using the pictures on the menus. My son liked the pictures so much he wanted to take it home. They were gracious enough to give him a clean one. This is definitely above average for DC dim sum, and head and shoulders above the rest for variety.
  4. I don't know if I went on an off-night, but I thought Kee was terrible. Or I ordered the wrong stuff - seafood - I felt like I was chewing on rubber.
  5. Facebook page. Read about this place on Chowhound so I went to check it out today (a Thursday). They do in fact have carts on weekdays but the selection wasn't great. I didn't see any turnip cakes. On the other hand, the dumpling soup (ordered off the menu) was a good deal for about $5 - lots of tasty hong kong style wontons or dumplings. The dim sum quality was good, not great. I tried their chicken feet, lotus wrapped sticky rice, fish balls, and fried yam dumpling. Their seasoning are on the light side, and not oily at all. Now you have even more options for Cantonese food around 7 corners.
  6. Rolling Cooking is a restaurant that has only been open since 2016 on Rolling Road near Old Keene Mill Road in Springfield. It's in the same plaza as Afghan Kabob and TCS Computer, behind Einstein Bagels. However, this version of Rolling Cooking is only 4 weeks old, according to the hostess, meaning it changed ownership at the end of January 2018. In the past 3 days I've ordered delivery and carry out, and right now, this is the best of Springfield's Americanized Chinese restaurants. What strikes me is how greaseless the fried dishes are -- the shrimp tempura has a heavier crust than I'm used to, but the greaseless crunch on the outside gives way to soft shrimp on the inside, and the salt-and-pepper flounder filet are delightful pillows of deliciousness. And I had this latter dish after delivery and carry out, both, and in both cases, it was delectable. In my delivery order a few days ago came shredded pork with chili peppers and General Tso's chicken. The pork was OK, not spectacular, but tasty. The General Tso's chicken was a nice rendition, with perfectly portioned chicken cubes bathed in a not-overly-sweet sauce that had a nice kick. In my take-out order tonight, I repeated the salt-and-pepper flounder to prove I wasn't imaging its goodness a few days -- I wasn't -- and I added the whole fried rockfish. The rockfish was a bit over-fried, so it had some dryness, and when the dryness co-mingled with the bony fish, it was as pleasant as I would have liked. This appears to be a dish to be eaten in the restaurant as soon as it comes out of the fryer. As I was waiting for my carry-out order, the hostess brought me a plate of warm, salty peanuts, followed by a cup of hot and sour soup, and a nice tumbler of hot tea. These treats were gratis, but inspired me to add a nice tip to the carry-out check. I also noticed a six-top occupied by a Hispanic family, and a beautiful dish of chicken fried rice in the middle of that table. A four-top with an Asian family speaking Chinese to the hostess is always a sign that the indigenous population enjoys the food here too. I'll keep an eye on Rolling Cooking to make sure that it stays consistent, but it ranks at least a nose ahead of Springfield's other Chinese offerings at this point.
  7. We went to Oriental East today. At first, we thought we made great time by getting there at 10:50 AM, but it turns out that there was already a line of about 200 people outside, waiting for the restaurant to open. They ran out of tables before we could get a seat, so we had to wait about 30 min for the first round of people to finish eating. Next time, we will be there 30 min prior to opening. Everything was really good, except for the turnip cake, which was too soggy. Oriental East doesn't have any warming mechanism on their cart to keep the dim sum warm, therefore, you have to get there early to get fresh and hot dim sum.
  8. I was out in Fairfax so I finally stopped in Nanjing Bistro (in the same shopping center as Chuy's). It's supposed to be authentic Nanjing cuisine. The menu I received has lots of pictures, so if you didn't get an authentic looking Chinese menu with pictures, you should request it. I had a cold spicy chicken dish (the sauce is surprisingly sweet with a hint of fishiness, probably from some kind of fish sauce), a bean paste fish filet, and some stirred fried veggies. None of them knocked my socks off but the food is pretty good.
  9. Little man requested Chinese food and the only criterion was to try a "new place," or "somewhere we haven't been before." Seeing this place in the Washington Chinese newspaper recently, I thought this would be a good candidate. Good signs: specials written in Chinese on a white board, mostly Chinese families, busy on Friday night with mostly Chinese families, Chinese families sharing a big round table, fish tanks, lots of clay pots and roast animals on tables, and good-looking roast ducks, chicken, pigs, and porks hanging on a window. Not so good signs: the prices. Little man and I shared: half roast duck ($12.50), stir-fry snow pea shoots ($14.95), vegetarian egg rolls ($2.45), and kingdom style pork chops ($12.95). We had more than half of each entree for leftovers, but even so, I had a little bit of sticker shock. I did really like their rendition of Kingdom Pork Chops. It was nicely sweet and sour, with a nice, slightly crispness to them. Little man's favorite tonight. The pea shoots are out of season, so it was slightly tough, but still good, even if a bit pricey. The duck was fine. I think XO or Golden Hong Kong has a slight edge to this duck. I didn't get to ask any questions about the chef or when they opened, as they were swamped tonight, but little man placed this restaurant in his top-eateries list. So we will be coming back. It is a great option for those living close to here. Taste @ Hong Kong (Ignore the wrong Chinese characters on the website's main page. The ones I used match those shown in the picture.)
  10. For those who are not a fan of Mark's Duck House but are a fan of Cantonese cooking in the Falls Church area, there is a little, hidden alternative pretty much right across the street. Open since February of this year, XO Taste has the hanging poultry & ducks, roast pork, and other familiar Cantonese dishes on an expansive menu, BUT in a much, much cleaner and brighter setting. Today's Pipa Duck was the highlight of the evening, nicely roasted, although slightly fatty still, crispy skin, with great juice and marinated flavor. The bonus was that it was not too salty or dry, as served at some places. They also had a great array of congee, so my friend and I went with the traditional Thousand year old eggs with pork congee. Again, not too salty, but not as thick as other Cantonese restaurants--this dish was every bit as comforting as good congee should be. The pork had a nice salty kick to it, but not overbearing. The only miss of the evening was the Seafood in XO sauce, since they didn't use a lot of sauce, and the kitchen used too much yellow chives and onions, and not enough seafood. But it's XO sauce! All this came to around $32, which is probably a bit pricier than some of its Cantonese counterparts, but for the atmosphere and complimentary sweet red bean soup dessert, I'd come here again. Especially to explore more parts of the menu. And those little swimmers in the water tanks towards the back of the restaurant. Most of tonight's diners were Asian families, in case you were wondering. Someone on one of the area chats asked if the reviewer had gone before, so it's on some people's radars. Hopefully it'll be on the area food critics' radars soon too. 6124 Arlington Blvd. Falls Church, VA 22044
  11. Sooooooooo yesterday I decided to try my new thing of spontaneity when it comes to restos as I explained in my previous post sort of. I was going to go to Eim Khao Mun Kai which is a very interesting and nice spot that serves Thai Chicken Rice. BUT I had always wanted to try the interesting looking Chinese restaurant across the way. I made the plunge and went across the street to see the menu. It was a pretty uninteresting menu featuring basicly what you could find on any Catonesey Chinese American restaurant menu. I persisted and went in and ordered. I got the salt and pepper pork chops and some roast meats on rice like duck etc (I am a great lover of the roasted Chinese meats!!!). I felt everything was a bit boring and too fatty for my personal taste. I wasn't really wowed by this. It just was kinda boring. Now I know I ordered kinda boring but when those roast meats are good it can be a sensational dish and this just wasn't. It was slightly better then New York Noodletown perhaps but not really super dee duper better ya know. I didn't love the pork chops either and felt the flavor was diluted by the fried fatty taste of the preperatioooonnn. So was this meal like terrible not quite but neither was it great either!!! I think in LA this food is much much better generally or San Fran or Vancouver for that matter!!!
  12. The MontCoDimSum Comparo visited New Fortune today for dim sum. I neglected to write down what we sampled, so this is not an exhaustive list:sui mei har gow shrimp cheong fan sweet rice with... um, I can't remember what was in it. Chinese sausage? salt & pepper head-on shrimp steamed BBQ pork buns mushrooms in some rich shoyu-based sauce I couldn't identify braised baby bok choy slices of char sui (roast pork) chicken feet turnip cake jellyfish steamed beef balls fun gor turnip cake sesame balls I'm blanking on the rest right now. What was that dish with the dried shrimp in rice noodle? I also remember an early dish, a flaky turnover with a sweet pork filling. New Fortune has been my dim sum place for several years, but I've never been able to sample so many different dishes before! One of the beauties of New Fortune is the griddle cart. At other dim sum emporiums, the turnip cakes and chive dumplings are fried and plated in the kitchen. At New Fortune, they give those items a final frying on the cart and dish them up fresh and crispy-edged. This really makes a difference. Another advantage of New Fortune is the vegetable selection. As much as I enjoyed Hollywood East overall, the lack of green vegetable offerings was noticeable and unwelcome. The very first thing on our table at New Fortune (before, say, plates and chopsticks) was the dish of (very addictive) bok choy. Also circulating through the dining room was a cart laden with green beans, asparagus, and Chinese broccoli. New Fortune sells BBQ meats for carryout, and of course they offer those goodies during dim sum. We had intended to get roast pig and roast duck, but wound up with a plate of char sui instead. This was hardly a sacrifice - it was perfectly moist, with a good balance of fatty meat and slightly sweet edges. The salt & pepper shrimp is usually one of my favorites, but the shrimp was somewhat mushy in texture today. Come to think of it, I was less impressed than usual with the shrimp cheong fan and the har gow, which are usually quite good at NF. Service was, well... it's dim sum. When we sat down, there were no plates, teacups, or utensils. It took a few minutes before we were set up properly. Daniel had also requested a dish of pickled vegetables, which never arrived. Otherwise, service was really quite good and efficient, and we were offered some special items that had just come from the kitchen (okay, next time we get the salt & pepper squid!). There was certainly no issue with the cart ladies not offering us everything available, unlike at Good Fortune. The tab came to $16 per person including tip. There was some talk about doing a New Fortune dinner - their regular menu is extensive and warrants group exploration.
  13. I can't seem to find a thread on Tasty Garden so I thought I would start one. Located at the corner of 355 and Middlebrook Road (in the strip center opposite Yuraku). They have roasted meats which have all been above average. Tanks with fish, lobster, eel, crab, etc. I have tried a variety of dishes here, but the roasted chicken with crispy garlic and steamed fish (from the tank) are standouts. The fish was cooked perfectly, simply seasoned, but very tasty. Another standout is the shrimp dumpling soup. The broth in this soup is magical. I have been about 4 times and really want to keep coming back and work through the menu. The owner has always been there when I am there and is warm and willing to suggest items.
  14. I was debating whether or not this place deserved its own thread, but I recently learned that it is under new ownership and has a new Cantonese chef. The menu is still the same -- until the end of the month -- but the food is actually edible. Carry-out tonight was Hunan Vegetables, Kung Pao Tofu, Garlic Seafood Combo, Crispy Shredded Chicken, and Spicy Eight Treasures. No need to go dish-by-dish, but the quality upgrade over the previous version of this place is significant. Lady KN and I agreed that we would order every one of these dishes again. No, this is not a destination restaurant, but thankfully, this plaza has a legitimate Americanized Chinese option to go with Kanjana Thai as not-too-bad places to eat.
  15. Don encouraged me to start a "mini-blog" about the search for my favorite chicken dish 炸å­é›ž. It generally translates to crispy fried chicken but literally means "fried young chicken." It looks like this. This is a popular dish in NY Chinatown but hard to find here. Years ago, my mother wrote down the Chinese characters so I could show it to the waiter because on menus it can be called many things in English. Also, different waiters speak different dialects so verbalizing it in my own dialect could get me nowhere. A couple of years ago, I flashed the characters asked at Full Kee. At that time, they said they could make it if I ordered it a day in advance. This is not surprising in a non-Chinatown restaurant because the prep is not trivial. Check out this video. Now I understand how the meat can be juicy and succulent yet sport a delicious crispy skin. My quest is to find and try out this dish in NoVa. Candidates to explore so far include China Wok, Lotus Garden, Mark's Duck House, XO Taste as well as what will be my starting point, Full Kee. I will keep you posted on my 炸å­é›ž experiences.
  16. East Pearl has been open only two weeks, but I've already been three times. The menu is huge, and since every dish I've had has been a hit, I am drawn to keep returning. No website, and too lazy to scan the takeout menu. In fact, as I look at it, I realize that a good chunk of the "chinese" part of the menu isn't even on the takeout menu. In the restaurant, there's not a separate Chinese menu, though there is an add-on page of specials that they have brought each time, so there's no non-Chinese bias. In fact, as soon as I start pointing to the "chinese" side of the menu, they smile and start recommending dishes. Some things I have had, in no particular order: Shrimp wonton noodle soup - nearly paper-thin wonton wrappers that hold large diced shrimp inside, nicely chewy noodles that are impossibly long, and a broth that some might call salty but I can't get enough of. Cured bacon with chinese broccoli - nicely bitter greens, a rich brown sauce, and not only pork belly but also chinese sausage. Deep fried spicy pork chop - not that spicy by my standards, but well fried and juicy Assorted meats & seafood w bean curd in casserole - nothing fancy, but tons of shrimp, scallops, squid, cuttlefish, pork, chicken in a rich sauce. Pig skin & turnips - I was thinking this might be crispy, but it was braised and oh so good. There are entire sections of the menu for noodle soups, "rice on xxx", casseroles, noodles (chow foon, rice noodles, e-fu, young chow, pan fried, etc.), BBQ, and that's not even counting 2 pages of "chef's specialties" which include all kind of organ meats, frog, lobster and clams, etc. All of the food on the other tables looks great, and I'm the only non-Chinese person I've seen in the restaurant after 3 visits. Portions are generous, and prices are low. Three of us were hungry tonight, polished off 3 dishes plus a noodle soup, and the total was still well under $20pp after tax and tip. Definitely a $20 Tuesday candidate.
  17. Does anyone know where to find a proper Cantonese Roast Chicken in the DC area?
  18. The former Good Fortune space on University Boulevard in Wheaton is now split into two restaurants - Cam Ranh Bay on the right, and Gourmet Inspirations on the left. The ownership has changed, but the space has been renovated and on their website (http://www.gichinese.com), the new owner of Gourmet Inspiration says: It has been a while since I went to Good Fortune - the interior has definitely been spruced up. We arrived shortly after they opened at 10:30 on Sunday, there were only a few tables of folks when we got there but it was filling up rapidly by 11:30. At first only a few carts were circulating, but more carts were added after a little while and new items were added to the carts. The good: "¢ everything we got was fresh and hot "¢ no line or wait to get in at opening "¢ service was attentive with tea, carts, and a special order of gai lan The acceptable: "¢ gai lan, siu mai, har gao, cream buns, shrimp rice noodle rolls, taro puffs The less than stellar: "¢ the tofu skin rolls were in a weird gelatinous sauce and the filling was odd in a way that I couldn't quite figure out We only had three in our party, one of whom was not very hungry, so did not sample a wide range. While this was not the greatest dim sum ever, I have had far worse. I'd eat dim sum here again, although in part that is because it is one of the closest to my house in PG county and I don't like Oriental East on weekends. Also, they have made arrangements to allow use of part of the Bank of America lot across the street for parking on Sundays and evenings, and at the Pearle Vision lot when Pearle is closed.
  19. Had Sichuan food on my mind last night, as so often happens, so I visited the poorly-programmed website for Hong Kong Palace. (hint: URL tags, like fading relationships, need some sort of closure) Ah. The owners just bought a place called China Jade up near Shady Grove Metro. So I just happened to find myself in the Shady Grove area at lunchtime today, and can report that the Cumin Beef recipe successfully made the trip north. Much of the HKP menu is duplicated here, plus they've added Cantonese seafood dishes to the mix. When I sat down, Maggie the manager handed me the traditional and Americanized menus, and suggested some of the traditional specialties. This was before she even noticed I looked Asian. We chatted a little about HKP, and she pointed out a family also making its first visit after discovering the change in ownership. So if you're craving some of that HKP cumin beef or fish in peppery broth, but can't cope with crossing the river and getting lost in Seven Corners (Dean, I'm looking at you), give China Jade a try. China Jade 16805 Crabbs Branch Way Rockville, MD 20855 301-963-1570 11am-10pm daily It's at the intersection of Shady Grove Rd and Crabbs Branch Way, in the shopping center with Giant and Red Hot & Blue.
  20. As I was foraging through the newly-opened Momo's Nepalese Food in Springfield Plaza, I noticed across the parking lot a large banner declaring "Grand Opening" and many colored pennants flapping in the breeze at what is now called Golden Hong Kong.
  21. A friend of mine (who is similarly afflicted with a love of all things pork) made this recipe, which calls for cooking strips of pork hung from an S-hook in the top of the oven, with a tray of boiling water in the bottom of the oven providing steam. Sounds like a huge pain, but I'd be interested to see if anyone has experience making this dish (or anything else) with this technique.
  22. Catching up on some of my restaurant reviews. This place is.... interesting..... It seems that a family bought the malibu grill and partitioned the place in half. Half the restaurant is the malibu grill, the other half is Cheong Wong, a cantonese restaurant. I've gotten carry out from them twice. Both times were hit and miss. The First time the HK Wonton soup and pork fried rice were excellent but the beef chow foon was only ok. The second time around the spicy pork chop dish and house fried rice were good, but the wanton soup was bland. I'll probably give them another try in a few minutes but that is more of a result of the lack of good chinese food near me (Aside from Sichuan Village of course).
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