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Found 12 results

  1. Wynton Marsalis holds a special place in my heart, in that he's the most famous person (sorry, Jon 🍷) with whom I've ever had an extended conversation. On Jan 19, 1984, he performed a modern jazz concert at UNC-Charlotte - not long after his Grammy triumph - and my professor, my fellow student, and I drove two hours each way (from Clemson) to see it. Unbeknownst to the entire crowd, there was a "meet-and-greet" after the performance in a small room - we happened to overhear that it was occurring - and we got to speak with him, just the three of us, for what must have been twenty minutes - he even gave my professor (a fine, amateur horn player) pointers on his embouchure (you've never seen a Computer Science professor with a bigger smile on his face). Two of my greatest treasures are a Marsalis-autographed copy of the CDs linked to above (the second also autographed by drummer Jeff Watts). Enough background - this is a wonderful podcast: "Jazz Artist Wynton Marsalis Says Rap and Hip-Hop are 'More Damaging than a Statue of Robert E. Lee'" on washingtonpost.com
  2. Beethoven's first piano trio was scored for piano, violin, and cello, It's in E-flat major, and this particular recording was with three all-time greats: Eugene Istomin on Piano Isaac Stern on Violin Leonard Rose on Cello
  3. Steve Hackett is a rather underrated guitarist. Enjoy. From 'Foxtrot' - 'Horizons' From 'Nursery Chryme' - 'Return of the Giant Hogweed' From 'Voyage of the Acolyte' - Hackett's masterpiece 'Shadow of the Hierophant' From another solo work 'Spectral Mornings'. Perhaps one of his most singular iconic pieces he's ever written.
  4. Here's all you need to know: Vexations - Erik Satie - John Cale - John Cage Here's all you want to know: Unbelievably, John Cale is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
  5. Janet Baker at the height of her powers singing Haydn at the height of his, with Raymond Leppard on fortepiano.
  6. What I find incredible about this is that at 1:27, there is a very slight, almost imperceptible, mistake that nobody has probably even noticed before; yet, Spock gives a very slight, almost imperceptible, wince. Coincidence? I hate to piss on the party, but this music is not what Spock is playing. (But this is - it's by Ivan Ditmars.)
  7. If I were forced to pick one desert-island piece of piano music - perhaps *any* piece of music - the Piano Concerto #2 in B-Flat Major, Opus 83, by Johannes Brahms, would be under serious consideration - I could spend the rest of my life studying just this one piece, and still not plumb its immense depths. It is, simply put, one of the greatest pieces of music ever written - one of the greatest works of art produced in the history of mankind. B2, as I affectionately call it, is a piece of such profundity that I cannot adequately convey it using the clumsy written word; instead, I will direct you to one particularly great recording. At around 50 minutes in length, it is no small feat to get through, but each of the four movements is its own masterpiece, and listening to parts of it is better than never having heard it at all. I cannot imagine what could have possessed a human being to think of something this epic in scope - the profound encapsulation of musical heroism, written down with pen and paper. It is the equivalent of any Beethoven Symphony or Sonata, or of any painting by da Vinci, or of any play by Shakespeare. We can start right here with my choice for the greatest pianist who ever lived: Sviatislav Richter. It's in five parts on YouTube, so you'll need to listen to all five to hear the entire piece. You can spend as much time listening to this piece as you would reading War and Peace, and your time will be equally well-spent here: 1st Movement - Allegro non Troppo (This is a very long movement, and it was apparently necessary to split it into two YouTube entries.) 2nd Movement - Allegro Appassionato (Just when you think music can't get any more profound than the 1st movement, along comes the second.) 3rd Movement - Andante (This long, expansive, absolutely beautiful movement is almost desperately needed after the 1st 2 movements, which leave the listener completely spent.) 4th Movement - Allegro Grazioso (The ten-second passage from 1:56 - 2:06 is unspeakably difficult, but notice also the call-and-response motif from 1:05 - 1:30 - it is imperative to play this lightly.)
  8. I thoroughly enjoyed that wonderful performance. If you enjoy Brahms and challenging piano parts, watch this; Brahms - Piano Concerto #1 in D-Minor (Op 15) played by Hélène Grimaud
  9. Our members seem to be attracted to strong females, so you all might be interested in this relatively minor, semi-decent, somewhat-obscure classical pianist named Mart(h)a Argerich from Argentina. Here she is at age 67, playing Scarlatti's D-Minor Sonata, K141. It's only 3 1/2 minutes long, so drop whatever you're doing and watch this: All kidding aside, if you don't know about her, learn. Learn as much as you can. I'll post more about her if you promise to do your homework.
  10. I had been meaning to post something of the Brazilian singer Luciana Souza's weeks ago, and then it slipped my mind. I'll make up for it now. I'd have to say she's my favorite jazz/pop singer working today. "Doralice" (1960, Antí´nio Almeida and Dorival Caymmi) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FawMGW4xygg "Muita Bobeira" (1998, Luciana Souza) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06Xix1XnkLg "Here It Is" (2001, Leonard Cohen and Sharon Robinson) Enjoy.
  11. We have been enjoying the Young Concert Artists, a concert series held at the Kennedy Center (as well as in NYC) which features up-and-coming classical musicians. Artists are chosen via an international audition and are provided with recitals, educational, and management opportunities. The DC performances are held at the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater, usually on a Monday or Tuesday night (when much of the Center is quiet). The artists usually perform 4 or 5 pieces, some solo but often accompanied by piano or violin. Last night featured 19 year old French clarinetist Raphaí«l Sévère (yes, an evening of classical music devoted to the clarinet!). And he was wonderful. Last night he performed: Johannes Brahms - Sonata for clarinet in E-flat major, Op. 120, No. 2 Pierre Boulez - Domaines for solo clarinet Sylvain Picart - Fantasy on Themes by John Williams Igor Stravinsky - L'Histoire du Soldat for clarinet, violin, and piano Francis Poulenc - Sonata for clarinet and piano Next performance is Bulgarian-American violinist Bella Hristova on Tuesday April 28. It's a lovely way to spend an evening at the Kennedy Center.
  12. It's probably inevitable that we have a thread here on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Whenever someone refers to a piece by Mozart, it's with a number ranging from 1 to 626, preceded by the letter K. The "K" stands for Köchel (pretty much rhymes with Herschel), and refers to a catalogue of Mozart's works issued by Ludwig von Köchel in 1862, during our Civil War. Köchel attempted to catalog the works in chronological order, but as could be supposed, much of it - particularly the early works - is a guessing game. Nevertheless, the Köchel Catalogue remains the reference standard for listing works of Mozart, and has been revised several times, most recently in 1964. Some pieces also have an Opus Number, but that's a different system altogether, and for Mozart, is nowhere near as complete - the Köchel system is what you want to be using. K1 through K5 are a series of Minuets written for the fortepiano when Mozart was 5 and 6 years old. They're not particularly important or interesting except for academic reasons, but here they are (I'm assuming the copyright has expired). EarlyPianoMusic.pdf
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