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Found 849 results

  1. I talked to a friend of mine who's familiar (although not financially involved) with one side of the story behind the Corner-Bistro / Evo-Bistro split (it's important to remember that this is one-sided information, regardless of how accurate it is). He wrote me, and allowed me to cut-and-paste his words verbatim: ----------------------------- Here is the situation with the Bistro. Sydney was the operating manager of the "Corner Bistro" when it was in the small place. He was a partner (not majority) with Joseph, who owned and operated the Mistral restaurant. And who constantly put in his 2+ cents in the running of the Bistro... They realized that the Bistro needed to grow, and eventually decided to do a double move: The Mistral would move to a location down the street (where the Chinese place was) - and it did, and the Corner Bistro would move to the old Mistral location - and it did too. They still had an active lease for the small place, and options were discussed as to what to do with that location.... Some time during the renovation of the old Mistral location in preparation for the new Corner Bistro, Sydney and Joseph had a business disagreement, more than likely as to either the concept of the new Corner Bistro, or the staffing, or Joseph's day-to-day involvement (i.e. lack of autonomy for Sydney), or a combination of everything. Net result: Sydney, the Bistro chef (Driz), the sous-chef ("Mami"), and the main waitress (Marina) all quit the Bistro!!! The New Bistro opened with all new staff. It's concept changed from a little wine bar to a more full fledge restaurant. From a business view point, it is doing very well, but it is a different set up now... The solution for the location of the old bistro was still is question. Eventually, to try and at least cover the lease, Joseph decided to turn it into a Burger joint ("Joe's Burgers"). Not sure how well it is doing, probably just limping along until a permanent solution is implemented. Meantime, Sydney looked for (and found) a location in McLean to open a new Bistro with the same concept as the old Corner Bistro: A wine bar with tapas. The result is his new place called "Evo Bistro" (Evo = Evolution). It is a little more upscale than the old Corner Bistro. All the individuals who quit the Corner Bistro are there! And a few more 'choice' individuals, specifically 2 people who also know wines! He is in partnership with 2 other people, but the responsibilities are clearly defined among them. Driz revamped the menu, and has many new dishes that look fabulous (can't wait to try them!). And Sydney has introduced a wine tasting section with automated wine dispenser, like the one at "Proof", except here the customer uses the machine with a pre-paid "Bistro card". Whew... That is the story...
  2. Last night they had a valet stand working. Dining room is completely set up. Looks like they smartly added to the bar area
  3. Finally, a good cup of coffee in Bethesda. Also they sell Vigilante beans, of which they get a shipment every Thursday evening.
  4. Does anyone remember Eddie and Brooks Robinson's Gorsuch House? Jul 13, 1964 - "Baltimore's Two Flags" by Frank Deford on si.com
  5. From the sounds of things, it seems that Little Sesame is a separate entity getting its start in DGS's lower-level, with a common co-owner in Nick Wiseman. Thus, it will also get its own thread. Congratulations to the whole team, Nick, Robin, and everyone else - please stay active here and let us know when you expand beyond lunch, get a beer and wine license, open another location, etc. All these pop-ups and restaurants within restaurant are parallel to recent college graduates living with mom and dad for a couple of years because they can't afford to pay rent (heck, I did it for a year - I think it's a great idea, and it can even bring the family closer together).
  6. Somehow this place has passed me by with stealth. I just really noticed it today, and it's apparently going to open in mid-May. (Well, that's the target.) Two of us spoke with a man working outside I assume is the owner, and he said that he plans outdoor seating and will also be applying for an alcohol permit to serve wine (or at least wine). Projected hours: 6AM to 9PM Mondays through Thursdays and 6 to 10 on Fridays and Saturdays. Closed Sundays. Since it has completely passed me by, I have no idea how far he has gotten with any of the permitting for outdoor seating or alcohol. I'm not sure how the immediate neighbors will react to those two facets of the operation. There is a decent space for a patio outside. (Visually, this is catty-corner from the northeast corner of the Car Barn, at 101 15th Street.) Their website is up and functioning: http://www.miascoffeehouse.com I wasn't sure if this was the right forum for the posting, but given that this is the coffee menu, I figured here: Espresso Americano Flat White French Press Pour Over Macchiato Cortado Cappucino Latte Cold Brew Iced Coffee Decaf House Blend
  7. Ben's Best's website has some beautiful tributes and memories - too many to depict here, but here's small sample:
  8. Details from the Washington Post here. Personally, I'm a little disappointed to hear that it's going to be, in part, ANOTHER pizza place; I realize that's not the entire focus of the place, but I don't think we're exactly lacking for good pizza places in DC.
  9. Anyone been recently? Couldn't find a thread but it looks like some people enjoyed it a few years ago (for cheap eats, even a rehearsal dinner)...
  10. For New York style pizza, Upper Crust on Pennsylvania Avenue (next door to Roti) is pretty good. Not like Giuseppi's Pizza was back in the day in Rockville, but close.
  11. Opened 10/21/2013 - Caffé Aficionado, 1919 N Lynn St, Arlington. A new high-end coffee house opened Monday in the CEB/Deloitte building in Rosslyn. They serve Handsome Coffee, from Los Angeles using a 2-group La Marzocco GB/5. They do pour overs later in the day and serve amazing pastries. Not sure who bakes them, but they are delish. Not everything on the menu is available--like some house made Belgian-style waffles. They also have fresh squeezed orange juice.
  12. Pretty cool little corner place amid a neighborhood of Formstone in Canton. Definitely has a quirky Baltimore vibe. We happened to be there on 'pretzel night'. The four different pretzels were more like a pizza made of pretzel dough, topped with various things. We had the Mexican one with chorizo, cheese, salsa and sour cream. As my dining companion said "This is like something I would eat drunk at 2am". I had a really nice crabcake (no filler), and alot of the other food coming out of the kitchen looked tasty. They've got a good bar too, which I hung out at while waiting for my friend to show up. Somehow they are charging $8 for Dale's Pale Ale, though. I don't think I've ever paid anywhere close to that for a beer in Baltimore before.
  13. This place is on Eutaw Street, near the Edgar Allen Poe House and the UMD Medical center. We had dinner there last night. If you go to their web site (http://www.alewifebaltimore.com/), the brief slide show gives you a good idea of what it's like inside -- dark, lots of wood surfaces. It's in an old bank building. I'm not an expert on architecture, but the outside says "Greek revival" to me. The inside features one small interior room, not pictured in the slide show, that may have been the vault, complete with steel door. They have a huge selection of beers, both on tap and in bottles. If you can't find anything you like, then you just don't like beer. They also offer cocktails and wine. I wasn't in the mood for beer last night, so I enjoyed a stiff Manhattan and a serviceable glass of pinot noir. Both of my dining companions branched out and tried a couple drafts they'd never tasted before. For food, daughter and I had the same thing, starting with the smoked tomato soup, which was good, and the Cajun pot pie, which was just OK. It was at least 90% rice, with little evidence of the promised andouille, crawfish, crab, shrimp and chicken, and while pleasantly warming on chilly evening, the flavor was largely one-note (cayenne). My SO had a black bean burger with fries, which she liked well enough. Service was pleasant and efficient on an evening when the front room consisted of 5 or 6 tables and a few customers at the long bar, such that the lone waiter was easily able to see to everyone's needs. It's likely we will return to try some other items on the menu and explore the beer list.
  14. Tried this since Taqueria Distrito Federal seems to be closed and the kids really wanted Mexican. They just opened a few weeks ago and are still not on a fully regular schedule. It's a pretty limited menu with around 5 choices for tacos, same for burritos, and a few sides such as beans and rice as well as the chicken. We got two tacos (fish and al pastor), chips and salsa, a steak burrito and quesadilla. I had the steak burrito prepared al arriba, which means it is doused with salsa and guacamole. It had a nice taste, but not a lot of meat for the size. Felt like it was mostly rice and beans. Only tasted the taco al pastor which had an interesting juxtaposition of slight spice with something sweet as well, some sort of fruit I think. Kids' quesadilla was pretty standard fare, though they also forgot to prepare it so it came out quite a few minutes after everything else. Salsa was very good, though a little too salty for me. Generally the food was good, but at a cost. Our total bill was $41, then with tax and tip ended up being over $53. For a place that doesn't have alcohol and you order from a counter and then sit down, the prices are way too much IMO. My burrito alone was $15. They brought our food to us, but others they called out their numbers and were expected to come up to pick up their food. This really made me miss TDF already.
  15. When I had dinner at Al Crostino the other night, I noticed that the place next door was also new (well, at least I think so). Creme. It looks like more bar/lounge than restaurant, however our server at Al Crostino said it was in fact a restaurant. Has anyone heard anything about this place or been there?
  16. Is it just me, or does it seem like there is a lot of restaurant closings over the past 3 months? Seems like everytime I tune into DR.com, Facebook, Eater, etc... there is another announcement of a place closing down. More so than I can ever remember in the past.... I can only offer my sentiments to those that have had to close up shop....
  17. Bob's Noodle 66 needs to be added to the $20 Tuesday list. I attended an eGullet event there Saturday night. There were 12 people and more (very good) food than we could eat, for $16 per person, including tax and tip.
  18. After Jake's American Grille was quoting a 30-40 minute wait Saturday night with standing room only at the crowded bar, we hopped next door and had a very pleasant dinner at Terasol. Apparently Terasol was a short lived venture in Chevy Chase Arcade and after a two year search has re-opened at 5010 Connecticut Avenue (across the street from Politics and Prose). The front third of the space is an artisan gallery, selling locally produced pottery, jewelry, paintings photography, etc. The back two-thirds is a cafe serving up French bistro classics - onion soup, pate, quiches, ratatouille, boeuf bourguignon, roast chicken, to name a few dishes. The pate plate was two healthy slabs with a small pile of dressed greens, some sliced cornichons, and a little pot of grainy mustard. The quiche was light, fluffy, and quivering. The rataouille, served up in a medium sized souffle bowl, was luscious. Overall, the food made a very good first impression, perfect for a light lunch or dinner. Service was friendly and well meaning but a little hectic and confused. Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
  19. This is my favorite Chinese restaurant in Rockville. The menu is extensive, and I have never had anything that I didn't think was cooked perfectly. The squid deep fried in salt was tender, delecate, and served on a bed of lettuce and roasted garlic and onions. The Dungeness crab with ginger and green onions was wonderful. Try the seafood hot and sour soup for two. It comes in a bowl with enough for 4 at least. The whole fish Hunan style was spicy, crisp skinned and wonderfully moist and flaky. While the seafood is the star here, the other dishes are also very good. It can get crowded but it is worth a wait. The seafood is kept in tanks in the restaurant and is brought live to your table for approval before cooking. We have always had a wonderful meal there.
  20. From driving by over the weekend, it looks like O'Brien's is now named "Branded '72". Emphasis still appears to be on BBQ.
  21. It is truly amazing how much the area of S. Van Dorn Street, S. Pickett Street, and Edsall Road - all part of Alexandria near the Van Dorn Street Metro station - has been built up in the past few years - I had absolutely no idea a Red Lobster had opened up on S. Van Dorn Street, which shows just how long it has been since I've been here. In one of the self-contained complexes rests the Portner Brewhouse, opened by the descendents of Robert Portner. Having tried three different beers here, I wish I could say that the beer lived up to the romance, but both the atmosphere - which is cold and corporate-feeling (this brewery was obviously very well-funded) - and more importantly, the beers themselves, looked and tasted full-on industrial, even though the fermentation tanks are easily seen through windows behind the bar. I wanted to try the house staples and standards, so my friend and I had the following (we arrived during Social Hour, so prices were a dollar off): Hoffbrau Pilsner (20-ounce draft, $5) - despite it's 5.9% ABV, this was a glass of generic nothingness. Vienna Cabinet Lager (16-ounce draft, $4) - the word "copper" in the menu description caught my eye, as this is often a sign of an Amber Ale, a Scotch Ale, or a Red Ale - at 5% ABV, this was marginally my favorite beer of the three, (remember, my palate has a preference for malt over most hops), but I wouldn't return just for this. My friend didn't care for either beer, so I was "forced" to drink the above two - however, the words "orange peel" and "coriander" intrigued her enough to try this: Jaxson's Wheat (16-ounce draft, $4.25) - cloudy, and with more citrus and resin than the first two beers, but still with a palate presence of Anywheat from the grocery store. The problem with all three beers is that there was very little nose, virtually no depth, and a clipped finish - this was a forgettable experience in a forgettable atmosphere that felt like something you'd find inside a shopping mall. If I lived here, then maybe, but I just can't see making an effort, and I'm really sorry to say this, too, as this is the type of place I pull for.
  22. [Posted on eGullet in July 2004...gee, almost a year ago...] One more voice in praise of Eve. Went with a friend last Saturday night. First, I have to say that getting a reservation is Hard Work - I honestly don't know many eateries here that you have to call on Tuesday to make sure you get in on a Saturday night in the middle of summer. But I sort of knew what I was in for, so no complaints from me! Now, I have to disclose that I work at the restaurant where Cathal ran the kitchen before he and Meshelle opened Eve, but in a very unimportant capacity (part-time hostess). I don't think this had any role in the quality of food, or the ambience, only in how we were treated First, I LOVED the decor. Very warm, homey but sophisticated, and soooo cozy. Bar is a bit crowded, but not in an annoying way. Unusual setup of bar with the counter and couches along the wall makes the place feel very social and home-like. Service was very nice. Now, I am not a high-maintenance diner and I generally like my servers as unnoticeable as possible - tell me about the special, deliver the food, answer a random question and bye-bye. Our guy was very good - on hand when I needed him (not often) and not hovering when I didn't. Now, the food. I understand now why legends of Cathal are still alive at places he used to work. It's awfully good. I have no claim to expertise in judging food except bits and pieces gleaned in the course of late-night tequila-shootin' with the sous, bu the man is seriously good. Appetizer was baby beets and goat cheese salad. Anyone who hails from Russia has ideas about beets, mainly about how to avoid it when mommy insists. But this dish was really very good, clean, great ingredients shining through with minimum fuss. I had my mind made up about entrees before going (I know I know..idle hands with Internet access...will have to think about something to put on timesheet) - pork belly for me. But the duck special sounded too good to pass, so I went for it. So good! Can one make duck medium rare and incredibly tender at the same time? Yes yes, that describes mine. Garnished with a very earthy, garlicky-tasting mushroom (something o'woods?) with no trace of garlick ON it, must be some clever basting technique at work. But now I have to come back for my pork! Dessert was chocolate mojito - brick-shaped thingie of mousse crossed with flourless cake structure encased in chocolate glaze with mint Jello scattered about. So good. My friend had a peach granita that was quite good, too, I am just not a white chocolate fan. I can't wait to try the tasting room! Meshelle told me they are going to start "Industry Nights" on Mondays in August - I am officially on a mission to get all kitchen folks from our place to go already. Oh, and she was so very gracious and wonderful to us - stopped by, like, three times in the middle of a Saturday night rush (I know what that's like!) Just a delight to be around. Face it, being cheerful can be very tiring when it's a part of your job description - we've all had these moments at the end of a busy night when you look at your guests and think, oh would y'all just go cluster!@#$ yourselves! But she was grace under pressure personified. Made for a great night for us.
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