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Found 913 results

  1. Consider Pó, which is on Carnelia Street in the Village. It has a six-course tasting menu at the unheard of price of $48, and the food is extraordinary. I think that this was Mario's first place in New York, and it continues in the tradition. It's small, not elegant and a tough reservation, but a wonderful value for New York or, for that matter, anywhere else.
  2. Fine dining has apparently arrived in Springfield! Monty's Steakhouse recently opened in the Whole Foods plaza on Old Keene Mill and Rolling Roads in Springfield. I haven't yet eaten there, but I stopped in today for a look-see. It's a nicely appointed dining room with white table cloths on the tables and a tidy bar in the front corner. Monty's is independently owned and touts itself as "best value" upscale, casual dining. The owner is Springfield native Donna Montazami, with a Cafe LaRuche and Vapiano pedigree, and the executive chef is CIA graduate Marco Camacho, who worked at the Woodmore Country Club and the Mayflower. I glanced at the menu and was impressed by the reasonable prices -- dry aged, locally sourced beef and lamb chops in the mostly $25- $40 range, plus fresh seafood options and specialty burgers. Lady Kibbee and I will likely drop in for a meal in a few days. http://montyssteakhouse.com/
  3. Has anyone been? I have a reservation for Friday, and I can't find anything on DR.com about this place. I would be very grateful for feedback from anyone who have information. And dear mods, if there is a topic already, feel free to move this post and delete the duplicate. Cheers.
  4. Steel Plate opened recently in Brookland from the owner of Rustik. It's located on 12th between Monroe and Newton (right across the street from Smith Public Trust, which is in it's World Cup soft opening phase). +1 and I went childless last night to check it out, although it's apparently quite child-friendly (high-chairs and what not and we saw 3 kids while we were there). We didn't get to check out the upstairs, but the downstairs space is nice. A bit dark with the dark wood everywhere, but a nice long bar down the right side, booths on the left, and tables up front by the window. Exposed brick wall, Edison lights...not atypical from a lot of new openings, but I liked the space. Our server was also very friendly and helpful with suggestions. It wasn't too busy when we were there (6:30-7:30 or so on a Thursday night with maybe 6 people at the bar and 8-10 at tables). They also have HH from 5-7pm that apparently is good a the tables as well as the bar ($2 off Rose, Malbec, and draft beers). As for the food, I didn't think it was out of this world, but we definitely liked it, look forward to going back, and are very happy to have another "nicer" option in the hood. We started with the Corn Cobblets (miso butter, herbs, mojama - $4) and the Pork Cheek Tonkatsu (tonkatsu sauce, mustard greens - $8). The corn was one cob cut into four pieces and coated with the butter and seasoning. Good summer appetizer with a little twist from the miso flavor. My +1 loves miso and liked this a lot. The pork cheek was two good-sized chunks with Japanese BBQ sauce and some greens on the side. Very rich and meaty with a nice tang from the sauce. We had a hard time deciding on entrees (the waitress recommended the lamb burger and beet catsup, which wasn't up our alley, but apparently is quite good). But we ended up splitting the Sloppy Jose (pork shoulder, tomatillo sauce, chayote apple slaw - $12) with fries and the 'Shroom Ravioli (shitake, bean sprouts, broth - $14). The sandwich was large and good. We couldn't taste the tomatillo really, but the pork and sauce plus the slaw were quite tasty. And the fries were thin cut and hot and crispy. They are served with mayo here (which I believe is homemade) unless you ask for ketchup. I liked, but did not love, the ravioli. 5-6 ravioli in a well-seasoned broth topped with mushrooms, carrots, bean sprouts, and some other veggies, and swimming alongside ginger pearls. Definitely seemed like a good light pasta dish for the season and had some interesting flavor. We had to ask for spoons to get at the broth. Dessert might have been my favorite part of the meal. We split the Uber Chocolate Trifle (dark chocolate cake, milk pudding, hazelnut crisp - $7). Served in a stemless wine glass, this was a rich and delicious end to the meal. The hazelnut crisps (almost like a cross between rice krispies and a brittle) on top were a nice contrast to the soft cake and sauce. Other menu options included Doro Wat Wings, tots, 3 salads (charred caesar, house, and mustard green), chef's board (soft goat, cow/goat blue, and firm sheep with duck prosciutto, camel sausage, and cured catfish), lamb and lentil burger, beef burger, daily flatbread, fried chicken and dumplings, veggie hotbrown, BBQ brisket, spiced catfish, and scallops, and some other sides. Definitely some interesting sounding and eclectic dishes with most things in the $11-15 range and the most expensive being the scallops at $18.
  5. FWIW, the Negril in Gaithersburg has been sold and is now called Antonio's. It's still selling Jamaican food but has added Latin American food to the menu. All this has been reported on in some other thread. My coworkers and I hit this place for lunch at least once every other week. It's sad to report that after maintaining the previous owner's high standards for several months after the change in ownership, Antonio's has officially gone downhill. The last two meals there have been extremely unremarkable (I won't say "bland" but in comparison to previous efforts, it certainly seems that way). The spicy scotch bonnet hot sauce has been replaced by the generic red hot sauce that you find at the Chinese fast food outlets in the mega-mall. The jerk chicken no longer has any kick and the chicken curry tastes like they're using generic curry powder out of a can. Ugh.
  6. Being new to donrockwell.com I decided to look around and see what I could find about the places in my neighborhood. I was a little surprised that there were not any posts about Sixth Engine even though they've been open for over three years now. Perhaps that's because it wallows in mediocrity. Don't get me wrong, they've always had a consistently good brunch and well cooked burgers. The problem for me is that much of the rest of the menu has always been a little 'heavy handed' when it comes to ingredients and sauces. Thankfully, the chef who opened the place, Paul Madrid, has left and things are starting to get better. Additions like the arugula salad and roasted cauliflower with "Ling Sauce", which is very much a sweeter General Tso's sauce, have injected life back into the menu. Hopefully they will continue down this path. The bar program, on the other hand, came flying out of the gate and hasn't lost its momentum. Draft beers rotate regularly to highlight the best of the season and the bartenders take pride in not only making the drinks, but also the ingredients, creating custom shrubs and tonics to use in their creations. While I realize the latter can be found at craft cocktail bars all over the city, it's surprising to find in a place that has the vibe of a glorified TGI Fridays. The layout is more on par with the food than the bar program. Do not go there if you're looking for a quiet evening. The bar bleeds into the downstairs dining area and with TVs in both, it can quickly become a situation where you have to yell at the person across the table from you in order for them to hear you easily. The beautiful upstairs dining room has exposed brick walls and hardwood floors that echo all of the activity in the kitchen that adjoins it. Surprisingly the outdoor patio is the least noisy of the three even with the traffic on Mass Ave just a few feet away. There are a plethora of tables and the service is good. The sun us really the only enemy. During happy hour you're fine and in the shade while the sun scorches Philos' patio across the street. During brunch though you are in the sun's crosshairs and it will roast you at your table even with umbrellas in place to help prevent that. At the end of the day Sixth Engine is a nice place to get a drink and maybe have something to eat if it speaks to you. Otherwise, have a few drinks and walk around the corner to Wise Guy Pizza and score a slice of pie.
  7. Was jonesing for Korean so I loaded up the kids and we went to Tosokchon for a late Sunday Lunch. We all thought is was Fantastic. Seafood Pancake was top notch and not too greasy. I didn't get the dumplings since I hesitated and the kids killed them. Bibimbap was pretty standard the noo roong ji crispy rice element was well developed in it, the Soondae Guk was a wonderful broth and the requisite blood sausage and other offal bits in it were worth the gout flare up potential. The Noodle Soup with Clams was a delicious soup with wellmade, chewy noodles and way too many clams for the price. The star of the meal was the Gamja Tang. The soup was so well developed; spicy, sweet, robust with julienne vegetables and an abundance of beautifully cooked pork, a few carrots and a chunk of potato. So good, I really am looking forward to being a little under the weather and letting this stew cure me sometime this winter. There was some banchan, kimchi was delightful. My wife didn't quite understand the toasted rice water/tea they served us throughout but we all grew to find it quite refreshing. 2beers, 2 apps 4 entrees $71 before tip. I may go back for Gamja Tang tomorrow
  8. I just saw a sign for a new Grille restaurant to open near Terasol on Conn. & Fessenden. Does anyone know about it?
  9. Details from the Washington Post here. Personally, I'm a little disappointed to hear that it's going to be, in part, ANOTHER pizza place; I realize that's not the entire focus of the place, but I don't think we're exactly lacking for good pizza places in DC.
  10. Garrison has been open for just over a week now. It's a handsome restaurant with a pleasant patio space in front. The menu is vegetable-centric and apparently emphasizes seasonal produce. Mr. P and I nibbled our way through a number of vegetable side dishes/appetizers and a pasta course. Poppy seed gougères were excellent: very small and took awhile to come out, suggesting they were made to order. Gougères are as much about texture as flavor, and these were spot-on. Heirloom tomato salad was nicely composed, with a piece of burrata and mint rather than basil (a nice change of pace), and slivers of almond. Fennel gratin was straightforward but intense, the flavor punched up with a splash of Pernod. Squash blossoms with smoked provolone and Romesco sauce were outstanding, perfectly fried and not too much cheese, so the flavor of the blossoms wasn't overwhelmed. Mr. P also had the roasted cauliflower; he liked it but said it was his least-favorite dish. As I don't care for cauliflower I can't usefully describe the dish. Sweet corn tortellini was a nice summery pasta dish, buttery but not overwhelmingly so. The pasta was a tad overcooked but I'm so accustomed to that now it doesn't bother me. We also ordered two of the three desserts, a chocolate terrine and buttermilk panna cotta, which were pleasant but unremarkable. A nice way to end a meal, not too sweet, not too large, and blessedly not precious, either. Coffee was adequate. Would have liked to have half-and-half or cream with it rather than cold milk, but nope, not an option. Service was genuinely friendly and polite but somewhat lacking in a few ways that aren't worth going into, because for a place open just over a week it was impressively good.
  11. When I was at Pentagon City mall a few days ago, I noticed the Ruby Tuesday has closed. The sign on the paneling over the empty space says that a Harry's Tap Room will be opening there. I can't recall if it gave an ETA other than "soon" on the sign.
  12. For New York style pizza, Upper Crust on Pennsylvania Avenue (next door to Roti) is pretty good. Not like Giuseppi's Pizza was back in the day in Rockville, but close.
  13. Although I've had many a late night drink/dessert here while listening to live piano jazz over the past few years, the food was never something to come here for. Well, gotta say that may be changing. I joined a group of 4 friends which chose 701 for dinner on Friday night. We were pleasantly surprised with our meals [we were sampling each others all night]. Seems that 701 has a new Chef Bobby Verua [sp?] who started this past Restaurant Week [whatta time to start lol]. Think he hails from NY, and brings subtle Asian influence to the dishes [but not in what I call the normal retread way]. For starters, we tried the Beef Carpaccio w/ Arugula, shaved Parmesan, & Mustard Vinaigrette, Ribbons of Tuna [Crushed Avocado, Rice Crisps, and a creamy Garlic sauce ... great contrast w/ the rice crisps and the tuna!], Fried Calamari [perfectly fried lightly w/ a light coating ... but the accompanying sauce really kicks it up], and Asian Pear/Romaine/Bleu Cheese salad, and a small plate of Pumpkin Raviolis [glazed Chestnuts w/ Truffle-Sage brown butter sauce, lightly sweet]. Very good beginning to our meal. For mains, we tried the Horseradish-Crusted Veal Chop w/ Quail Egg, Potato Dauphin, & a Sweet-Soy Bordelaise [hunk a scoop of everything in one bite, great], Glazed Pork Belly w/ Sweet Potato Puree & Pickled Cherries [tasty fatty goodness, another place for me to get my Pork Belly fill lol], Stuffed Saddle of Lamb w/ Braised Tomatoes, Crisped Potato Confit, and Pear Demi [quite good but didn't love], Dry-Aged Sirlion Steak w/ Ancho-Soy Glaze, Gingered Shiitakes and Truffled Potatoes [nicely done], and Roasted Mahi-Mahi w/ Sweet Potato Ravioli, Malayasian Chili Sauce & Basil Oil [liked but also didn't love]. Perhaps my tastes of the Veal Chop & Pork Belly tainted the rest of my tasting, dunno but the flavors of those 2 were excellent. As for desserts, not so much. We were cautioned by the server that the desserts aren't there yet, the Chef hasn't focused yet on them [putting his stamp on the 1st/2nds] but will be very soon. Thankful for that information [and not particularly attracted to the dessert list], we still shared a couple w/ coffee. Lemon cheesecake [eh], and honestly an Apple-something else which was cold [i.e. not fully cooked, not easy to cut through] that underwhelmed me. Our thoughts were that warm desserts would have gone over well with the cold weather, perhaps something lightened like a warm ricotta cheesecake, else a bread pudding or sorts. There are lots of choices if the Chef peruses the competition, looking forward to trying his versions once ready [just based on what we saw with the other courses]. As for service, it's fine as it's always been for me. He had a good sense of humor, chatted us up, and nicely prefaced our expectations about the desserts [so as not to ruin or lessen our experience much] We were mentioned how happy we were with the meals to the server, that the Chef stopped by to thank us. He's young, looks to be only in his early 30s perhaps? Very gracious. Server mentioned how liked he was so far, & has the kitchen's respect already. [guess plugging away at 200 meals during a RW night on your 1st week can do that heh]. Now I have an excuse to actually try meals at 701! Maybe take advantage of their Pre-Theater menu for less than $30.
  14. I recently asked bbhasin what was good these days at Bombay Curry Company, and he sent me quite a detailed response. I thought it was too good to waste on one person, so I asked for his permission to reprint it. Here it is, in its entirety: Cheers, Rocks. The menu is not too elaborate, as some Indian restaurants go, and comprises of some of the traditional ' comfort foods' like butter chicken, korma, vindaloo etc. which I am sure you may have tried elsewhere. Focus instead on things you may not find elsewhere. For starters try the chicken wings, marinated and charcoal broiled in the tandoor oven. The Bhel Puri, a melange of puffed rice, savoury indian noodles, diced onion & chopped cilantro mixed with our sweet & spicy tamarind chutney. Great textures & flavors. I would also recommend the Shammi kabab, little griddle fried patties 'of almost pate`consistancy' ground beef and split yellow lentils. Our samosa filling is also a bit different, you will feel the tanginess from the dried mago powder. Do not ignore the little Kachumbar salad For your dinner Try the chicken Kadai, hot and spicy, chunks of chicken stir fried in kadai(heavy wok) with crushed dried red chilles, cilantro seeds, chopped ginger and garlic and then finished in a thick tomato sauce with fresh cilantro and dried fenugreek leaves. Pathar Kabab- is a pounded lamb scallopine marinated and flash grilled on the griddle. Tradionally the shephards cooked it on the hot stones around their campfire. The Fish curry is Cubes of Cod loin simmered in a curried creamy sauce with coconut, mustard seeds, curry leaves and toasted chilly peppers. I think the Bombay Curry Company does a very good job with the biryanis, almost like fried rice. Chooza kabab is skewered marinated chicken chunks with onion tomato and pepper, grilled, served on abed of steamed rice topped with a curried sauce. Was very popular at a New Delhi restaurant I worked 30 years ago. But then, food is relative, different things appeal differently to different people. I think our butter chicken is the best around. Jeff Tunks likes it as he mentioned in the Washingtonian, Jim the chef from RT's down the street gets it without fail but my friend's 13 year old says it tastes like tomato soup, I could kill him! The lady from Bistrot Lafayette likes the Lamb in the curried spinach. Mike, who worked for Roberto Donna and now has his own place La Lucia(I think) in Alexandria loves the Tandoori Chicken and if its not on the sunday buffet when he comes in, we have to do some to keep the peace. So go figure.
  15. As I was in a bit of a "treat yo'self" mood last night, I decided to check out Mike Isabella's new place Kapnos and apply some strict ethnic scrutiny to what he is offering to the DC-area bourgeoisie as Greek food. The focus Kapnos (meaning 'smoke') is grilled foods from Northern Greece, although many of the items of the menu are classic Greek dishes regardless of their local origin within the country. Not wanting to BS around with the shi-shi items on the menu, e.g., kohlrabi crudite (I'm fairly sure the average Greek does not know what kohlrabi is, and certainly not in this economy...) or duck pita (duck phyllo pie on the menu), I lined up some of my favorite foods and those that I thought would most representative of Kapnos' focus. Tyrokafteri "“ Too much tyri (cheese) and not enough kafteri (spiciness). Tyrokafteri should really bring some heat, and I thought the sparse and thin slices of hot pepper could not provide enough heat to balance what essentially was a large plate of whipped feta with olive oil. The fresh-baked pita was really nice though; I always liked that at Zaytinya. Patates tou Fourno (aka Fourno Patates on the menu) "“ My username on this site also happens to list two of the basic ingredients for patates tou fourno (oven-roasted potatoes): ladi (oil) and lemoni (not surprisingly, lemon), oven-roasted potatoes have always been one of my absolute favorite dishes since I was a kid. So, you can imagine they hold a special place in my food life. Isabella's version is good, and more importantly, the dish does not try to do anything clever; they are simple and rustic. The potatoes themselves had that nice golden appearance with some charring, and were neither too mealy nor undercooked. However, in Greek cuisine, you can rarely have oil without lemon, and unfortunately, that's what was lacking from these potatoes. A bit more lemon and this dish will be a standard plate for every table at Kapnos. Charred Octopus "“ This was the big winner, and I could tell from the moment I sunk my knife into the first tentacle. Octopus is tricky to cook (as I learned first-hand recently), so I commend any chef who nails this. This was tender, not chewy in the slightest, and had that great roast flavor. Plus, the green harissa was a really nice addition to the dish. Overall favorite and this should be a standard plate for anyone dining here. Roasted Goat "“ So close, but not there yet. The goat is quite tender and has all the characteristics of delicious spit-roasted meats. However, like the potatoes, it was lacking something to balance out all that meatiness. I would have liked another herb or perhaps a tad more salt on the goat itself, because the harissa + yogurt combo on the plate was not enough to balance. But, I can see this dish improving over time as the restaurant evolves. Overall, I'd say that Kapnos earns a solid B+ right now. Since the restaurant is so new, I imagine the recipes will be worked and re-worked until they hit their peak. However, it's a worthwhile entry and I'll be keeping an eye on its progress over time.
  16. Wanted to grab a quick drink and bite with a friend and I thought we'd try Stageplate, having read about it somewhere. Meh - they opened in August and their menu still has "coming soon" teasers of appetizers. There were two and we ordered both - calamari and shrimp. Completely average Limited options of wines by the glass. Entrees were mid 20s to 30s - not sustainable. And a very odd vibe - we both were unsure what to make of the place. I give it 4 months, tops.
  17. Looks like a new restaurant is taking over the 21st and P corner that was formerly Cafe Trope. Its called Scion. Was walking by today and a "Now hiring" sign is in the window. Anyone have any info?
  18. I noticed that Piola (Pizza) is opening in Rosslyn next to Cafe Asia. I'm sure it's just some international corporate mess (their other U.S. locations are in Miami and New York), but has anyone ever been who can tell me something more?
  19. Definitely hipster Asian joint (in the vein of Momofoku or Toki Underground). I had their steamed pork dumplings and pork bao. Their bao were just like Momfoku in that steamed bun with a taco type presentation vs traditional enclosed bao. Quality was decent. I'm definitely interested in going back and trying their house made noodles. http://www.nainaisnoodles.com/ 1200 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910 301-585-6678
  20. [posted on eGullet 2003-2004] I have been to Makoto a dozen times-or-so over the years, and shaped by the crusty shell that has gathered around it, my opinion has become less critical, more accepting - think of the elegant decay that defines Venice which has literally been sinking for centuries. I still want to judge Makoto neck-to-neck with the finest restaurants, but that is simply not fair. The chef's menu, as always, has 1-2 compelling courses, a thing-or-two that shouldn't have been included, and the rest falling within the genre of interesting but not-quite-there. But yo, homeys, it's $45 for about ten courses! And if you order the tenderloin (and I urge you to despite your natural inclination to get the fish as the main course), you'll have a decadent, satisfying four-gulp portion of steak that is easily worth $10 by itself. Their small fatty pork dish is as good as anyones in Washington. The cold, unfiltered sake, though expensive at about $12 for a small carafe, is one of the city's great unknown treasures. The persimmon with a tofu paste is beautifully presented, but ultimately bland: but it's persimmon! - where else in the city will you get that as a savory course? You get a good scallop, a good shrimp, a couple mushrooms, all thrown into a miniature teppanyaki thing and overcooked right before your eyes. The small inital courses are always more interesting than the inevitable grilled-protein/soba/shaved-grape-ice which is the triad finishing the meal. Their sushi/sashimi has, in the past, been as-good-or-better than anyones in Washington, although my recent visit was perhaps the result of El-Nino: the fish was okay, but not world-class like it has been before. It needs to be repeated that the 10-course chef's menu is $45. Where does Makoto fall short? It dicks you on the incidentals, and I don't mean maybe. The supplements to the Tsukuri (raw fish) course are a rip-off. Avoid them and get what comes with the tasting menu (trust me on this). Thirsty? Ask for some water and you'll be told that they only serve "bottled water," but what they plop down in front of you is this El Cheapo soft-plastic half-liter Pennsylvania-Turnpike "spring water" that is so insulting that you'd prefer to have DC tap water in its stead. Your incidentals will easily and quickly double the course of your meal if you're not careful. The cold, unfiltered sake is worth the price, but other than that, try to avoid the bottled water, steer clear of the fish supplements, and don't order anything extra. Several years ago, I'd feel like a cheapskate advising you to do this, but things are different now: restaurants are not turning over two seatings each night on every table. You won't be hurting them at all if you go in and stick to the basic chef's menu with a beer and some tea, at least not during the week. This is my summary: Get the tasting menu. Order the tenderloin (not the salmon, or orange roughy, etc.) as the main course. Don't stress about the sobas, which other than the fermented bean curd, are virtually interchangeable though you'll never go wrong with the mushrooms or the yams. Do not order any extra sushi or sashimi. The last time I did this I paid dearly for extra fatty tuna, fatty yellowtail, spanish mackeral, uni, and egg, and quite frankly the only thing worth getting out of the bunch was the egg (yet the single greatest piece of sashimi I've ever tried was the fatty yellowtail on a previous visit.) Stay away from the bottled water. Be careful on your ever-increasing cold-unfiltered sake tab, which can quickly rise because it's so good. If you do this, you'll walk out of Makoto thinking to yourself, gee, how did they pull that off at that price? The answer: the chef's menu should be priced a bit higher than it is. Go see for yourselves, as this remains one of the great fine-dining options in Washington if approached with caution. "Fine-dining" is relative, but this place at least goes through the motions and makes an attempt, even if it sometimes falls short. Cheers, Rocks
  21. I'm sure this thread already exists, but I can't find it. Went here today for lunch, and really enjoyed it. As opposed to Friday, when they apparently had such a crowd that they ran out of pastrami by 2:30 pm, it was pretty quiet at 12:30 today, with no line, and plenty of seating inside. It's been a while since I've eaten at Wagshall's, so I can't second the position of the Post that it's the best pastrami in the city, but it's a really good sandwich. I had the Stacked, which was pastrami, slaw and dijon mustard on a kind of brioche bun. I got potato salad as well for I'm not sure what reason. The sandwich wasn't huge, but was definitely plenty of food, and as mentioned in the article it was a remarkably engineered sandwich, as it maintained structural stability throughout. And the pastrami itself was pretty fantastic. I'll definitely be back.
  22. I can't say too much about the food at Corsino Cantina, because we only stopped in for a glass of wine and a few nibbles at the bar. I mentioned in a post from several years ago how much I liked that lots of places in NYC bring you a snack at the bar. We were at Corsino during happy hour and were each treated to a ricotta and orange honey crostini, a generous cube of mortadella, and a dish of olives and pickled veggies. The crostini were quite good so we ordered a few more: fennel, orange & white anchovy and chicken liver. Both were very simple but nicely prepared. Everything on the menu is under $20, with the exception of a seafood pasta that includes lobster ($21). The ambiance was warm and friendly, with warm wood walls and floors and candelight. The bartender was pleasent helpful and had no problem pouring samples of a wine or two, so we could find one we liked. They had a great selection of Italian wines - and grappa. It seemed like a popular local spot and is one that I would be happy to stop back into on a future visit to the neighborhood.
  23. Can't believe you people didn't got going on Palena yet. The cafe menu continues to grow and amaze as always. From the latest, bisque with mussels, touch of rice and spinach flan; stuffed Pennsylvania lamb with piquillo bread sauce; and hen gallantine sexed up with pistachios and foie gras have blown my mind. The menu is so familiar and well-loved by now that ordering became a struggle, although not entirely un-looked-forward to. Should I have something new? Or should I get the best burger in NW? Of course, last night I figured had to have my burger fix before taking off for two weeks of caviar therapy. I said it first...Jeff is very dreamy and extremely dexterous with beverages of all sorts.
  24. I'm going tonight to this restaurant for a friend's birthday. I'd never heard of it before yesterday. Has anyone been? Any must-order dishes?
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