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Found 10 results

  1. Sey Coffee is from the same folks who brought Lofted Coffee. This is my first shipment of Sey Coffee that arrived today. Jhon Wilson Poveda In the Cup: pineapple, meyer lemon, mango, peach, floral Layo Taraga In the Cup: black tea, watermelon, persimmon, citrus Carlos Calderon In the Cup: tropical fruits, tangerine, floral Jair Caicedo In the Cup: meyer lemon, white grape, black tea Carlos Calderon and Jair Caicedo are already sold out. Here is the link to their site: https://seycoffee.com/
  2. I drove past today, and there's signage up on the window of the old Tutti Frutti frozen yogurt shop, so Rare Bird is probably getting pretty close to opening. I also found this: "Food News: Rare Bird Coffee Roasters, Longhorn Steakhouse, Coming to Falls Church" by Jody Fellows on fcnp.com As far as I can tell, this is not a second outlet; they're moving their base of operations to Falls Church.
  3. Yet another lovely independent business in Brooklyn. Gorilla Coffee is a corner coffee shop and roaster in Park Slope. The handful of red topped tables evoke 1950s/60s era diner. An old guy wearing a fedora behind the bar is taking orders, a young hipstery Asian woman is making coffee. Cafe au lait and an almond pastry to go please. oh, yeah, the Gorilla art is great too.
  4. I started Saturday and Sunday mornings here this weekend at the 20th Street location in Chelsea. Their cappuccino was creamy coffee goodness. The shop was narrow, sleek, very well kept, and adorned with interesting artwork that appeared to be for sale. It is on a nice tree lined street right down the block from the NYPD 10th Precinct Station (which was about the only thing to remind you you were in the middle of Manhattan). The only negative for me was that they do not open until 7:30am on weekends which means I had 45 minutes to wander the streets passing probably a dozen open Starbucks in the process (NYC must have the highest concentration of Starbucks per square mile of any place I have been). Nevertheless, I kept my resolve and was glad I did. This is a coffee worth the wait.
  5. My expectations of Rapphannock Coffee & Roasting were so low that it wouldn't have taken much to exceed them. However, despite its flaws, Rappahannock is one coffee house that South Arlington or North Alexandria residents should be aware of. I walked into Rappahannock, and was immediately caught off-guard by Beethoven's Emperor Concerto playing on the speakers (at this point, it was theirs to lose ). There was one lady working the counter, and about ten customers on a late weekday morning. Looking around the room at some of the decor (including several types of Ethiopian coffee beans), it's possible that there is an East African ownership of, or influence on, Rappahannock - there's also a large parking lot in back with plenty of off-street parking (there's a stone walkway up to the front of the store, so I assume parking here won't result in your car getting towed (check the signs more carefully than I did, just to be sure). I ordered a Large Americano ($2.85), and added a fourth shot of espresso ($.60) - the barista is quiet and reserved, but opens up once you say more than two words to her. She smiled as she gave me the WiFi password. Taking a seat in the sunlit back seating area, with the roaster merely feet away in its own sun room, I plugged into Rappahannock's WiFi and set out to enjoy my coffee. Reading some of the reviews online, one gathers that Rappahannock's roast is on the dark side (it is), but my Americano is a level up from what you'll get at Starbucks. They have simple syrup at the fixins bar, and did I mention the Emperor Concerto was playing when I walked in? Rappahannock's website is here, and there's a fairly accurate description from The Washington Post's Alex Beattie here. Reports are that the bagels are above-average and the thing to get here, but Rappahannock also has a selection of panini sandwiches, salads, and soups in the $3 - $7.50 range. A recycling container sits in a little nook in the back. Online bean sales have been temporarily discontinued, probably because of lack of demand. Rapahannock Coffee & Roasting, operating under the name JCL Coffee, Inc., is an above-average independent coffee house. It merits serious consideration by people along the Columbia Pike corridor, but is essentially a local destination. For putting out a decent product at a reasonable price, for offering WiFi in a funky, sunlit seating area, and for not vaporizing the squalling, demanding little brat and his inept mother (for whom I feel pity, rather than anger), Rappahannock is initialized in Italic in the Dining Guide, alongside of most independent coffee houses. While top-flight independents can rest comfortably, the sorry state of South Arlington coffee is the buoyancy that pushes Rappahannock up to the top of its neighborhood. As I was walking out, I heard Chopin's 3rd Piano Sonata playing, so I took a seat along the front wall, overlooking Columbia Pike through the large front bay windows, and continued to work and enjoy my coffee, still hot after nearly thirty minutes. PS - The Florida Fresh-Squeezed Orange Juice (Large, $2.79) is nothing more than Tropicana Pure Premium, poured straight from the carton.
  6. I first tried Karlací¡ Coffee at a tasting they were holding at Weygandt's in Cleveland Park. Owner Oscar Aldana grew up in Colombia and moved to the States when he was 26. He started Karlací¡ to support Colombian coffee growers from the Quindio region, many of whom he knows from his youth/family connections. A cool story and roasters of some very nice coffee.
  7. Follow up to the DC location posts above -- Zeke's DC location is opening on Sat, Nov. 2 (via Bakehouse's Facebook post of Zeke's Facebook post).
  8. Dublin Roasters is overdue for its own topic here on donrockwell.com. Of course, that assumes I didn't miss one despite searching for it. Up in Frederick today, I'd been meaning to visit Dublin since i first learned about it a year or so ago. Great shop. The owner, Serina Roy, is a former Frederick police officer with a love for coffee. Though she's been roasting coffee for more than 15 years, I'm not exactly sure how long Dublin has been operating. At least several years as its current location is its second. They seem to source beans very carefully from a mix of direct relationships with farmers and through wholesalers. The roasting operation centers on a 65 lb roaster visible from the counter. The woman staffing the counter today, Taylor, couldn't have been any nicer or more accomodating. We tried an espresso which, served in a coffee cup rather than a demitasse, tasted more like coffee than espresso but was excellent. I ordered a french press (they don't do pourovers) of a Yemeni coffee since coffee from Yemen isn't too common in shops in this country. it was pretty good and probably would have been even better had I had a bit more patience before depressing the plunger (one of a few reasons why I prefer hand pours). They have a large variety of coffees and I love, love, love how accommodating they are. They'll brew anything they have to order if you ask. It really bums me out when I'm in shops around the country who'll be selling 6 or 7 different beans at retail but will only brew one for you. That's not so uncommon and highly annoying. The space is great. Huge. Free and good WiFi. Lots of old sofas and comfy chairs. And, it's all situated about 2 miles from downtown Frederick so plenty of parking and space inside the former motorcycle wearhouse. Definitely worth a stop when in Frederick. Very cool. I'm a fan.
  9. Oby Lee had a really good coffee shop/roastery in Rehoboth Beach for years. He could make disgusting-sounding flavored coffees taste really good. Their sticky buns were legendary. We heard he lost it in a bitter divorce. Anyone been to his place in Arlington? http://www.obylee.com/
  10. I don't know Annandale that well but, as best I can tell, amidst all the great Asian restaurants, it's an area very under served by good coffee. While I can't be 100% certain (and would love a good challenge here from any who know Annandale better), I feel pretty safe advising that anyone in the area looking for decent coffee should go here and only here. OTOH, by no means would it make sense to drive here from Arlington County, Alexandria, DC or MoCo for coffee. Beanetics, like Caffe Amouri in Vienna or Misha's in Alexandria, roasts their own beans, which they largely buy from a NY based wholesaler. Relative to all the other roasters I can think of in our area, the operation here is a bit larger in terms of the square footage devoted to a large capacity roaster and related equipment and beans at immediate left when you enter. Pretty cool setup based only on curb appeal. I ordered a small cappuccino and a pourover (the latter using their own roasted Hawaiian Kona coffee since that's a varietal less common with shops who sell other roasters' beans). I forget the type of espresso machine they have but it wasn't a Marzocco. The capp was heavy on foam relative to the espresso and the espresso itself was a bit bitter. Serviceable to be sure but probably a better bet to go for freshly brewed coffee here. They offer either french press or pourover though the latter with a plastic funnel and filters too small for the opening but workable. My Kona was okay. Nothing with especially notable flavor or complexity but smooth enough and drinkable. The owners here have definite passion for what they're doing. They had maybe a dozen different single origin and blended beans available for sale in unusual but perhaps more advanced packaging. They do put roast dates on all the packages, which is great to see. Most were roasted within the past 5 to 7 days with just a few that went back no more than 17 or so days. Pastries, cookies, muffins are all fairly standard for area shops. They serve Two Leaves and a Bud tea, one of the two better options available on the market for bagged teas. I like when I see this or Mighty Leaf in a coffee shop since I don't expect them to invest more in the best loose leaf tea program. If looking for a decent cup before or after an Asian repast out Annandale way, you probably can't do too much better than Beanetics unless headed back toward DC.
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