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Found 21 results

  1. My girlfriend, friend and I checked out Unconventional Diner last Friday. They plan on serving breakfast and lunch soon, but for now are just serving dinner. The space itself was modern looking and bright--not "cozy" but more "clean" and "trendy". At 6:30, the place was only half-full (more on that later), but it filled up by the time we left. We were seated near the semi-open kitchen. The cocktail menu was okay. Like a lot of places, it leans toward the sweeter side, which is not my favorite taste. I don't remember which drink I ended up ordering, but it was good and fairly priced. As for starters, we ordered the following: chicken pot pie poppers -- the kitchen seemed to be churning these out. Think rillettes, but with chicken pot pie ingredients. Fun presentation and tasty (though not incredible). everything lox -- this is basically a deconstructed everything bagel with cream cheese and lox, which is one of my favorite foods. Unsurprisingly, I liked this a lot. The lox was tasty and a good portion, and I enjoyed the bagel bites that it came with. Chef Deshaies, who was expediting not too far from us, noticed us looking around for a serving spoon after this was dropped at our table and had a waiter grab one for us, without us having to ask. Then, he noticed us still having a bit of trouble serving it, he grabbed us another spoon himself to make it easier for us. We were impressed by his ability to do so many things at once. wheat berry & butternut squash salad -- none of us cared much for this. its dressing was too close to mayo. For entrees, I ordered the crab linguini with squid ink pasta in and crab bisque. This was decadent, with a good portion of crab and well-cooked pasta. My friend ordered the steak and eggs, medium rare, with chimichurri and sunny side up eggs. This was beautifully presented on a large plate (picture from the restaurant's website below) and tasted as good as it looks. My girlfriend ordered the fried chicken, which was a half-bird that came with a biscuit, gravy, cole slaw and homemade hot sauce. Even though it was only a half-chicken, this was a TON of food because the breading makes it look bigger. We loved this as well. Our only complaint was that the food came out too fast. We had all our appetizers within 10 minutes of ordering, and our entrees not too long after that. Next time, i'll ask them to pace it better. The GM and chef came to our table to ask how everything was during our meal, which was nice. On another note, I worry about how this place will do long term. I think many people will go thinking it's diner food at diner prices, which it is definitely not. Those looking for higher-end food probably are not interested in elevated diner food. Those interested in diner food don't want to pay $25+ an entrée for it. I hope they find an audience, because the food is good and Chef Deshaies is clearly quite a talent.
  2. Folks -- Any recommendations for a late dinner with friends around the Washington Convention Center? Moderately priced. Any cuisine but of course good food Thanks!! --- To make this clear for out-of-town visitors, there was an "old" Convention Center, and there is a "new" Convention Center. *IN THEORY ONLY* every post on this thread was written after the new convention center opened, and should therefore pertain to the new one, and not the old one, but double check to be sure - here are descriptions of the old, and the new: Washington Convention Center (The Old Convention Center): This was located at 909 H Street NW, to the northwest of Verizon Center. Opening in 1982, it was 800,000 square feet, making it the fourth-largest convention center in the United States. However, by 1997, it was only the thirtieth-largest, as other cities poured money into competing for convention dollars. Plans were made for a newer, more modern facility, and on Dec 18, 2004 - 5 months before this website opened - it was imploded. Nevertheless, to show you how large this was, it's boundaries were: H Street NW on the South, New York Avenue NW on the North, 11th Street NW on the West, and 9th Street NW on the East. Walter E. Washington Convention Center (The New Convention Center) This is located at 801 Mt. Vernon Place NW, north of Mount Vernon Square. Opening in 2003 - the year before this website opened - it is 2,300,000 square feet, with 703,000 square feet of exhibit space. It's boundaries are: Mount Vernon Place on the South, N Street NW on the North, 9th Street NW on the West, and 7th Street NW on the East - just a five-minute walk from where the old convention center was.
  3. I was thinking about this restaurant the other day, knowing that it was supposed to open in the Spring (but figuring that it would be delayed) and realized that we went the whole summer with no news on when exactly it will start service. I figured I would come here to see if cheezepowder or any other members had heard any rumblings and was shocked to see that no one had posted a thread about it yet. There has been quite a bit of buzz on the internets for over a year now, and dare I say that if David Chang and Eric Ziebold did not have anticipated openings this year or early next year that this would be the hottest reservation in town when it opens. I'm sure everyone has at least heard in passing about it at this point, but wanted to see if anyone had any more insight into what sounds like a very cool new restaurant. Website / @thedabneydc on Twitter "Jeremiah Langhorne's Restaurant, The Dabney, Will Open in Blagden Alley" by Missy Frederick on dc.eater.com "Meet Jeremiah Langhorne: Picking Composters, Pigs, and Potential Line Cooks" by Tim Carman on washingtonpost.com
  4. Just wanted to get myself going. And what better way, than to sing the praises of my favorite spot. Thanks to Tom and his crew for a mgnificent evening of food and drink for our Rocks roast. That mushroom and crab(?) soup just added to my assertion that Chef Tom has the magic touch when it comes to that course. The steak was out of this world good. Someone mentioned elsewhere that it was in the same league as Ray's, and I agree. Spring rolls, Kit Kat bars and ice cream -- all excellent. But of course the piece de resistance was the company.
  5. Shouk is a fast-casual eatery serving 100 percent plant-based deliciousness!!! Here is the menu: - the restaurant opened May 3rd. On Sunday, May 15, 2016, I enjoyed the following: Shouk Pita with roasted fennel, crispy potato, red pepper, pistachio pesto Polenta fries with tomato tahina Shouk Salad with lots of fresh & roasted veggies, crunch, tahina vinaigrette
  6. "I like to watch" - perhaps one of the most memorable lines ever uttered by Peter Sellers. I agree that the Columbia Room deserves some investigation. Derek's running a "Shaking vs Stirring" session on Wed 3/24. Drinks include Dry Martini, Gimlet, Ramos Gin Fizz, Sazerac and Golden Gin Fizz.. This has a great deal of appeal to me (as long as I work doesn't take me out of town). Anyone else interested?
  7. As a Hong Kong native, I'm pleased to report that dinner at Tiger Fork was a satisfying taste of home for me. The combination of technique and ingredient quality accounts for much of the positive experience. Cantonese food in East Asia (and, for that matter, in Vancouver, Toronto, SF, and NYC) is represented across the full price spectrum. In the DC area, I feel that most Chinese cooking available to us is clustered around a relatively low price point. The Source comes to mind as an exception, but I've always found their interpretations to be too muted in flavor. In interviews, the team behind Tiger Fork talk about research trips to Hong Kong and the menu reads like a collection of their favorite finds. Nothing wrong with that. There's a focus on dai pai dong (street-side food stalls) classics, with some dim sum and HK BBQ thrown in. They really did their homework; I think the flavors and textures are pretty spot-on. Cheung Fun with Shrimp and Flowering Chives and the "Kowloon Buns" showed expert dough technique: chewy but not tough. The cauliflower part of the Chinese Cauliflower dish was unremarkable, but the star was copious stir fried flowering chives which were crisp and fragrant and just the right amount of oily. The BBQ Plate of pork belly, char siu (why do so many restaurants, including this one, spell it "char sui" on their menus?), and soya chicken showed textbook preparation, but was elevated by use of high quality cuts. Minor nit: the char siu marinade tastes exactly like the jar of Lee Kum Kee I have in my fridge right now. I'll give them the benefit of the doubt that they happened to have perfectly reverse-engineered it for their house-made version! We didn't try any of the (heavily hyped) baijiu cocktails, but the Hong Kong Milk Tea was good: properly strong and not too sweet. We wanted to try the Coconut Rice Cakes for dessert, but they were already sold out at 7pm. The HK Style Egg Tart is, according to the Washingtonian piece on the restaurant, out-sourced to Maria's of Rockville. It's not a great egg tart. (Tiger Fork: if you're reading this, please in-house the next version. I suggest studying the Portuguese egg tart from Fat Rice in Chicago.) Front of house was run perfectly--there were no signs that it was opening week. By the time we left, the bar and dining room were packed. This is a great addition to the local scene and I'm looking forward to trying more of the menu (especially the announced dim sum brunch expansion).
  8. I normally don't cut-and-paste press releases, but then one says all you need to know. That said, while this may technically be "Shaw," it seems to be the centroid of Shaw, Convention Center, Mount Vernon Square, and Logan Circle, so I'm not sure exactly where to put this in the Dining Guide. Congratulations, Ron and Sherman! --- WASHINGTON, DC - August 21, 2013: Bringing new flavor to 9th St. NW in the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, DC, Thally serves Modern American Cuisine created by Chef and Co-Owner Ron Tanaka, along with a rotating list of wines and craft beers, custom cocktails, housemade sodas, and unique spirits in a 70 seat restaurant which includes a 14 seat bar. The restaurant hopes to open on or about Tuesday, August 27th. A Dream Realized Thally is the brainchild of two good friends who have been talking about opening up their own casually elegant restaurant in Washington, DC for years. Chef & Co-Owner Ron Tanaka and General Manager & Co-Owner Sherman Outhuok finally found the perfect place, on a burgeoning block of 9th St. NW near the DC Convention Center, and Thally was born. Thally was conceived to be a comfortable and inviting neighborhood restaurant, as well as a destination worthy of Washingtonians crossing the city to discover our mouthwatering cuisine. Our name pays tribute to our Shaw neighborhood as well as our families: "Thally" refers to the Tally-Ho Stables (built in 1883) located in Naylor Court directly behind our restaurant, as well as to Thalia, Sherman's daughter. (Thally is pronounced without saying the "h", as in Tally-Ho.) The interior décor also reflects the character of Thally's surrounding neighborhood. Design details include: exposed brick, reclaimed wood, vintage barn-door hardware, blackboards, antique pipe fittings, leather seating, substantial wood and steel tables, and a 28 ft. absolute black granite bar with leather-finish. Our logo and the custom wall graphics created by local graphic designer/ artist Matthew Hlubny for Thally's dining rooms and bathrooms feature images of the antique stables, row-houses and carriage houses that are characteristic of the Blagden Alley-Naylor Court designated historic district in the Shaw neighborhood, contained between O and M Streets and 9th and 10th Streets. MENU Simple, Fresh, and Flavorful"¦ all of Thally's dinner dishes have been carefully created by Chef Ron Tanaka with those three words in mind. FIRST COURSE chilled cucumber soup "“ greek yogurt, celery, cumin, dill, mint romaine salad- capers, grapefruit, worcestershire croutons, buttermilk vinaigrette salad of grilled peach, crisp prosciutto, spiced cottage cheese, bibb lettuce, balsamic watermelon, heirloom tomato, herbed goat cheese, pickled radish bacon, lettuce, tomato, avocado, avocado vinaigrette, pain de mie toast crab roulette- peekytoe crab, cauliflower/tomato salad, dill carnitas sope- pork shoulder, red chile sauce, epazote, radish SECOND COURSE swiss chard- tarbais beans, fennel, mushrooms, shallots grilled branzino- eggplant caponata, basil, piquillo jus pan seared rockfish- corn salsa, filet beans, tomato, tarragon roast duck- artichoke, greens, black olive sauce grilled pork t-bone, mustard brined, pinto bean puree, mustard greens, ginger, grilled scallion grilled delmonico steak- baby spinach, coffee dust, bordelaise sauce BEVERAGES WINE: Thally will serve 24 wines by the glass, with a rotating list that switches out 6 wines by the glass per week! DRAFT BEER: Our bar has 10 craft beers on draft. DRAFT CIDER: We're cider fans, and will always have 2 ciders on tap and a few by the bottle. THALLYTAILS: Custom cocktails created by Co-Owner Sherman Outhuok. HOUSEMADE SODAS: In lieu of serving traditional sodas squirted from a soda gun, Thally will be making its own sodas and colas. OUR TEAM Thally is co-owned by Chef Ron Tanaka, Sherman Outhuok, and Paolo Sacco. Ron Tanaka, Chef & Co-Owner A native of San Diego, Chef Tanaka began his culinary career in the mid 90s when he came to DC and began working in the pantry of the Morrison-Clark Inn under the tutelage of Susan McCreight-Lindeborge, who was a great inspiration to him. He was then spirited away by well-known Michel Richard who hired Tanaka as a line cook when he opened Citronelle. He continued to refine his cooking talents and techniques while working for Frank Ruta at Palena and then Eric Ziebold at CityZen. When Cork opened on 14th St NW, Tanaka was hired as Executive Chef, putting the restaurant (and himself) on DC's culinary map. Excited for new adventures, Chef Tanaka left Cork to reinvigorate New Heights in Woodley Park, quickly making it a must "“go dining destination, and earning it accolades on Washingtonian's "2012 Very Best Restaurants" List. He is excited to now open his own restaurant which dedicates itself to Simple, Fresh, and Flavorful Modern American cuisine. Sherman Outhuok, General Manager & Co-Owner A longtime fixture on DC's bar scene, Sherman Outhuok was a managing partner for a number of years at Posto restaurant on 14thSt. He then went on to open Maple in Columbia Heights as the Bar Manager /AGM. He makes his own "Cello" (sweet and citrusy) liquors, inspired from his time at Posto. You'll regularly find Outhuok behind the bar mixing up new batches of Lemon, Tangerine, Orange and even Grapefruit Cello. You'll also see him front-of-house, greeting guests. Paolo Sacco, Co-Owner With more than 20 years of experience in Washington, DC, as well as substantial culinary work throughout Italy, London, and New York, Paolo Sacco is highly regarded as a dynamic leader in the restaurant and hospitality industry. He is the well-known and admired Owner of Ristorante Tosca, Co-Owner of Posto, and now a Co-Owner of Thally. Sacco's hard work, dedication, and mission to always provide the highest quality cuisine and service to his patrons have placed him among the elite of Washington's restaurateurs. Sacco's career in DC began when he became the maitre d' at the very trendy Bice Restaurant from 1993-1995, where he was responsible for the operation of the dining room, as well as creating unique menus with the chef. Since its opening in April 2001, Ristorante Tosca has firmly established itself as a mature player and premier Italian restaurant on the Washington restaurant scene. Sacco's trattoria-style restaurant, Posto, has followed that same path "“ albeit on a more casual level, as it is quickly became a cornerstone on 14th St.'s restaurant row. With Sacco's guidance, Thally is poised to lead the charge in making 9th St. NW a culinary destination. LOCATION, HOURS, AND CONTACT INFO: Thally is located in the newly thriving 9th St. Corridor in Shaw, immediately adjacent to Seasonal Pantry and A&D Neighborhood Bar, in the middle of the block between N and O Streets NW. 1316 9th St. NW, Washington, DC 20001 202-733-3849 info@ThallyDC.com www.ThallyDC.com Facebook.com/ThallyDC Twitter: @ThallyDC Open Tuesday "“Sunday: 5pm -11:30pm (bar), 5:30pm - 11pm (kitchen) Closed Mondays Private Dining Thally is able to accommodate parties of up to 25 people in a separate, semi-private dining room. In addition, Thally is also available on Mondays for full restaurant buy-out to accommodate 70 people.
  9. Chef RJ Cooper will open his first independent project, Rogue 24, in the Mount Vernon Square neighborhood of Washington, DC. Projecting a winter, 2011 opening, Rogue 24 will be located in Blagden Alley at 1234 9th St., NW. Executive chef/ owner RJ Cooper, a seasoned veteran chef and James Beard Award winner, is thrilled to bring this landmark restaurant to the developing neighborhood of Mount Vernon Square in Northwest Washington, DC. The 2,600 square- foot restaurant will be tucked away in one of the vacant buildings in Blagden Alley, currently a trendy alley that houses experimental art exhibits. Blagden Alley, located directly west of the Washington, DC Convention Center, is in engaging new epicenter of revitalization. The project leadership of Norman Jamal of Douglas Development has lead a wave of recent development, from multi-million dollar condominiums to established art galleries, as well as a burgeoning social scene of coffee houses, bars and restaurants. This recent rehabilitation makes the neighborhood an excellent locale for the first fine dining restaurant in Blagden Alley. "The space is a perfect fit for the intimate, yet edgy experience of Rogue 24," says Cooper of the Blagden Alley location. "I look forward to joining the current and future independent retailers, artists and residents alike in developing this section of Mount Vernon Square as a distinct destination neighborhood." Celebrating Cooper's stylized urban fine-dining cuisine, Rogue 24 will exclusively offer an interactive 24-course tasting menu. Guests will be served a progression of small dishes that excite the senses, tantalize the palate, and awaken curiosity. The multi-course meal will offer a place at the table where guests can dig deep into a culinary team's philosophy: exploring their suppliers, cooking techniques and sources of inspiration. Rogue 24 will provide an effortless space for the diner to enjoy the imagination of Cooper's menu. The avant-garde beverage program will house a beverage director that will serve as both sommelier and mixologist and will prepare all beverages at a tableside cart, providing innovative pairings that will stimulate the entire experience. 8 beverage (a combination of wine, cocktails and beer) pairings will be offered throughout the 24- course meal. "It is my vision that Rogue 24 will provide an emotional experience. That is what creates memorable meals"”more than the food, the wine, and the service, the overall culture of the restaurant must evoke emotions in its guests." Working alongside Cooper, Harper McClure will serve as chef de cuisine. McClure hails from Atlanta's renowned Bacchanalia restaurant and previously worked with Cooper at Vidalia as his sous chef for nearly five years. The two chefs look forward to reuniting for this groundbreaking new project. ### Situated in the center of the 52-seat dining room, the state-of-the-art kitchen will showcase Cooper's creativity and desire to interact with guests. This architectural design will allow every guest to have an individual chef's table experience. Cooper has enlisted architects Brian Miller of edit and Lauren Winter of Winter Architecture, the famed duo behind Washington, DC's most creative and functional spaces including The Gibson, U Street Music Hall and Dickson Wine Bar, to execute this vision. Rogue 24 will be open for one dinner seating Tuesday-Thursday two dinner seatings Friday and Saturday evenings. The fixed menu price is $130, $140 for non-alcoholic beverage pairings and $170 for alcoholic beverage pairings. About Chef RJ Cooper and The Kid Can Cook, LLC Chef RJ Cooper's Rogue 24 will be the first of several restaurants as part of his and wife Judy Cooper's umbrella restaurant group, The Kid Can Cook, LLC. Rogue 24 will be followed by a variety of projects, including a more casual concept, Pigtails, to open in Washington, DC. Cooper is a seasoned veteran chef who has worked at some of the most prestigious restaurants in the nation, and has served as an integral part of the development in Washington, DC's fine-dining culture. Notable accolades include the prestigious James Beard Award for Best Chef Mid-Atlantic in 2007, as well as recognition from starchefs.com, as the 2006 Rising Star Chef. Cooper also works with the national non-profit organization Share Our Strength®, as a longtime advocate in the fight against childhood hunger. Cooper is the Chair of Share Our Strength's Taste of the Nation's® National Culinary Council, is the founder of Share Our Strength's Chefs on Bikes program and in 2008 was recognized with Share Our Strength's Leadership Award for Chef of the Year. Chef Cooper also serves on the Advisory Board of the startup, DC-based non-profit organization Chefs as Parents that is working to transform DC-public school nutrition programs.
  10. I was down at the GRB Convention Center this afternoon to pick up my bib for the marathon tomorrow, and stopped into Huynh for what was meant to be a quick lunch. I never thought about it until today, but Vietnamese food is an excellent choice for "carb-loading" before a race. Lots of rice/rice noodle dishes, and limited amounts of fat. Clearly many of my running compatriots had thought about such things before, as the restaurant was packed, with a 30 minute wait. The 4-year old and I shared orders of banh uot thit nuong and banh uot tom chay, rice paper wraps filled with grilled pork and crushed dried shrimp respectively. The pork wrap is served as a wrap with herbs and lettuce along for the ride, while the crushed shrimp is more of a loosely folded affair, topped with crisp fried onions. Light and carby. I wanted rice, but the boy demanded noodles, so we settled on bun tom nuong (rice vermicelli with grilled shrimp). As long as the protein is well-grilled, bun is pretty hard to screw up, but the well-seasoned, snappy-but-moist shrimp served atop our tangle of noodles kicks up Huynh's version a couple notches above the standard. Of course, while preparing for a marathon in the hot and humid Houston weather, one shouldn't neglect electrolyte replenishment, and the chanh muoi (salty lemonade) made with pickled lemons (or limes?) hit the spot. Let the rest of the country gorge themselves on plates of pasta. In Houston, we'll stick with Huynh.
  11. Location and Rates - Website This is a 15 story hotel, in an beautiful ornate building right across the street from City Hall. The lobby is small, but well appointed, and there were always many staff available to help. The car valet area is also small, given the corner on which the hotel is situated, and can lead to backups on the street. However, if you pull around the side, street parking has been set aside as a loading area for guests. Also, if you continue straight down Juniper for a block and a half, you can park in the convention center parking garage for over $10 cheaper per 24 hours than at the valet. Of course, you can't enter and leave for that savings, so you'll have to be prepared to leave your car there. This is no problem due to the location of the hotel, which is central to many of the sights. We walked to the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, etc. We walked to the Italian Market. We walked to South St. We walked to Reading Terminal market. I think we could have walked to the Rocky Steps/Art Museum. Anyway, you can't beat the location. There are 3 elevators, and given the size of the hotel and the speed in which they move, the hotel could stand to have 1 or 2 more. Be prepared to wait. Also, for safety reasons, you need your room key to get above the 2nd floor, so make sure you get plenty of keys when you check in. The room was "recently renovated", and included 2 queen beds. Neither large nor small, it adequately accommodated 4 adults and one 5 yr old for a 1-night stay. The room was modern, black and white color scheme, and had comfortable beds and pillows. The shower and toilet were separated from the sink area, making it easier for multiple people to get ready at the same time. Free wifi, with the option to pay for enhanced speed. Working and responsive thermostat. There's also a small, but useful, 7-11 one block away.
  12. Virtually destined to become an instant and epic temple of cocktail love, The Passenger breaks cover with Tim Carman's CityPaper interview here.
  13. Location and Rates for Tonight - Website Absolutely great report. Thank you! btw...getting that hotel for 100 bucks is a steal I have not been able to snag on priceline in 4 years. You paid at least half, if not a third. It's a rare deal. Best I've done is the Hyatt Penn's Landing for 70 bucks....out of season. Good for you!
  14. I recently discovered this little bar just a block north of the D.C. Convention Center. I've only been upstairs, but it's cozy. They have an upstairs back patio, which should be terrific in nicer weather, though they do seem to have gas heat lamps for cool temperatures. A friend of mine is bartending there tonight after 6:00. If anyone feels like it, drop on by and check the place out. I'll make it down there tonight eventually myself www.thespace-dc.com Don't know any details about edibles. Hopefully, more info will be forthcoming.
  15. My daughter just graduated from college and is moving to DC July 1 to start her new job, and I'll be spending a couple of days down there helping her move and celebrating the 4th. I don't get to DC that often though I live just north in Frederick, MD. so I'm looking for some dining options. Her new apartment is near the Convention Center, but we will be touring around DC with the rest of the tourists on the 4th. She loves to cook and eat good food - but she's not a fine diner (nor am I). Foams, foie gras, etc. are not up her alley. ALso, please note that Mom (that's me) will be footing the bill for the 15 meals to come. So.... Komi it ain't! What would be some good casual not too expensive places that we might consider for lunch and dinner? FWIW, we went to Rasika yesterday and LOVED it! Thanks!
  16. Hi all, I'm planning a sit-down dinner for approximately 45 people the evening of Wednesday, November 5. My guests will be staying at the Four Points Sheraton at 12th & K for a conference at the Convention Center. So the ideal location should be within a 12-15 minute walk of those venues. Due to the size of the party, we will need a private room. Our budget is a max of around $50 per person exclusive of tax, tip, and alcohol, preferably lower. I did a search of Open Table using the "larger party" option and found some surprisingly decent results. The ones I feel are close enough I've listed below. If anyone has alternate suggestions or comments about the following, I'd appreciate it. We're also very open about the type of restaurant -- ethnic food is definitely on the table (worst pun ever). Anyway, here's what Open Table has in the vicinity: Acadiana, Bibiana (!), Bobby Van's Grill, Brasserie Beck, Carmine's, Clyde's of Gallery Place, CoCo Sala, Cuba Libre, DC Coast, Kellari Taverna, Mio, Oceanaire, Ping Pong Dim Sum Chinatown, Poste, Rural Society. Thanks!
  17. I think everyone knows the answer is not Marrakesh in DC. I go there every few years for the experience, but the food hasn't changed in the nearly 20 years I've been going there. It's currently $27/person, or at least it is on Sunday nights. Just by coincidence I was there this evening. The salads were very nice. The chicken in the bastilla was softer than the egg (and there was more powdered sugar than anything else.) The roast chicken with olives and lemon was decent - a bit more lemon would have gone a long way, and you really can't have too many olives on that dish. The lamb shank with honey and almonds was good - tender and sweet from the honey, and the almonds were added late enough that they still had crunch. Couscous was fine, a fruit bowl is a fruit bowl, but the baklava was pretty weak. Boy, now that I write that, why did I go? Several years from now I suppose I'll forget, and go again... <edited to add: I'm a clam!>
  18. Rogue 24 is hiring cooks that want to push the boundaries of where food can go. work@rogue24.com
  19. Maybe Pratt Street Ale house? Granted, the beers from Olivers are really the draw here but I've had some salads / burgers and been satisfied. It's right across from the convention center, so it tends to be my go to when I head up to Camden Yards or Inner Harbor.
  20. I'm surprised on the board has mentioned this place, but I guess it was a real dive. I was in the neighborhood this weekend and because of restaurant week, there weren't many open options. So I looked on yelp and found Akosombo. It mainly serves Ghanaian food to local cab drivers. The building has no sign, looks dumpy, and inside is not the most well kept place. Plus the food is from a giant steam table and served in styrofoam containers. However, it's only $11, and the food was really good. pics I started with a groundnut/peanut soup with goat meat. Then I got rice with slow cooked chicken and spinach with egusi, some kind of ground seed. My favorite was the fufu, a starch ball of mashed cassava and plantain. You just drop it in a spicy soup which had a whole fish in it. I was told by one of the guys there that the best time to go is lunch on weekdays as some of their items were already gone.
  21. The following is a sample from the 8,000 emails we've received about the upcoming Fancy Food Show: Dried Kangaroo Boogers Hi Linda and Mary! I hope all well! I wanted to give you some information regarding Snotland Farms Dried Kangaroo Boogers, the first-ever dried boogers from these outback marsupials. Snotland Farms Dried Kangaroo Boogers will be showcased at the Summer Fancy Food Show on June 17-19, 2012. Snotland Farms Kangaroo Boogers are the optimal, nutritious, delicious, and all-natural, on-the-go snack. They feature honey-roasted boogers and real snot dried in lemur fur imported from Tanzania. I would like to invite you to sample this unique new snack at the Fancy Food Show at booth #3931. If you would like to further discuss the product, please feel free to contact me. Further information about Snotland Farms Dried Kangaroo Boogers is below. Please let me know if you would like to schedule a time to stop by the booth and discuss the product. Additional information, images and nutritional information are also available. I look forward to hearing from you! Best, C. Dundee
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