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Found 187 results

  1. Bye bye Blackie's. We won't hardly miss ya... Back when I was an undergrad at GW, this was one of the "destination" restaurants that parents took their little darlings to when they came to visit. I remembered it fondly, until I visited a few years after graduation, when I had gained a greater appreciation for good food. Remember those childhood shows that you remember fondly, until you catch them on Nick at Nite, and the memory is ruined by a godawful piece of dreck? Similar reaction...
  2. I'm going to be out in LA for a conference next week. Sadly, without a car (gov't travel ain't exactly luxurious...). So, can anybody recommend some places in (gulp) Central City for good lunches and not too expensive, but good!, dinners? I'll eat any kind of food (ok, actually I'm a fishaterian, so steak houses I'm not so interested in). By not too expensive, I mean less than roughly $50-60/person, including tax, tip, any liquor I want to drink, etc. I'll happily accept recommendations for good food that will require cab ride! And, of course, if it's something that LA does particularly well (e.g. Mexican, Asian), all the better. Thanks, --- Water Grill (Joe H)
  3. I can't find an existing thread. If there is one, please merge. I did not go here, but my wife did, for lunch. Here's what she said 'And I had an absolutely AMAZEBALLS lunch today. AMAZEBALLS. Did you see the picture I texted you? It was horribly expensive for lunch though. But daaaaaamn!' You have to understand, she's in publications and just doesn't talk like this. Apparently, it was a really good lunch.
  4. From the sounds of things, it seems that Little Sesame is a separate entity getting its start in DGS's lower-level, with a common co-owner in Nick Wiseman. Thus, it will also get its own thread. Congratulations to the whole team, Nick, Robin, and everyone else - please stay active here and let us know when you expand beyond lunch, get a beer and wine license, open another location, etc. All these pop-ups and restaurants within restaurant are parallel to recent college graduates living with mom and dad for a couple of years because they can't afford to pay rent (heck, I did it for a year - I think it's a great idea, and it can even bring the family closer together).
  5. http://www.bubandpops.com/Home_Page.php I hadn't realized this spot opened in February. I had the chance to drop in for a quick bite last month and was pleased...though I don't want to go too often as the kettle chips are very tempting and quite good. The day I stopped in I had a Turkey sub, and I loved it as it was shaved thinly, and roasted fresh. Wisely they have the chips on the counter for samples. Wise for them, unwise for me! I bought them and immediately put them in the kitchen when I returned to work so others would eat the majority. It is a family run operation, and it shows. They are extremely friendly and will chat with you if they are slow and you have the time. Nice to have a non-chain, family restaurant in the franchise-heavy golden triangle. Mr. S went on a different day and tried the brisket and said it was delicious. The menu has lots of appealing items, but almost all are off limits for me due to allergies. I do hope others will go and report back on the rest of the menu as I think this type of place can easily be missed. (like all their home-made pickles and roast pork sammies) It's in an English Basement and difficult to see from the road. They're also aiming to catch the late-night crowd as they are open 'til 3am.
  6. Surprised there hasn't been discussion of Batali's extravagant new venture - Eataly. I'm going to be in NYC next week and it'll be hard not to give this place a visit. This is so over the top but the success of the one in Venice makes one think this could actually work.
  7. Expansion is always a scary word for acolytes of a particular restaurant. Although it often results in financial stability, a new creative avenue, and the room to retain or promote staff -- as a selfish group, us diners demand our favorite chef to be chained to his or her one restaurant, serving us with the dedication of a lifelong host. For Hugo Ortega, who is the American dream personified (Mexican immigrant dishwasher to James Beard award winner), expansion is just another way to demonstrate why he’s one of the best chefs in Texas. Xochi is the newest of the four restaurants he runs in Houston, opened this year, and a no better argument for adding even more to his mini-empire. Occupying one corner of the brand-new and gorgeous Marriott Marquis downtown, Xochi is sleek and lively, keeping up the modern aesthetic that Mexican restaurants have finally been allowed to embrace nationwide. The food follows suit; progressive and rooted in history (mostly Oaxacan) at the same time, for an all-together exciting meal that deviates just enough from Ortega’s other restaurants. Infladita de conejo ($14) -- Ortega’s version of the Olvera-popularized street snack. A puffed black tortilla cradled a sizable portion of braised rabbit, the bitterness of the fried tortilla balancing out the sweet, tomato-braised conejo. Red and green sauces with raisins and almonds rounded out the dish. Something old, something new, but a complete success. Puerco en mole de chicatana ($15) -- The pork ribs are fine on their own; obviously distant in comparison to the smoked meats found at true barbecue pits. But the real magic is when you pull apart the meat and slather on the “ant” mole served underneath. Ortega has long welcomed the presence of insects in his cuisine, and ants are what I assume account for the acidic and sweet notes in the otherwise hearty mole. Add the mole-doused rib meat to the accompanying corn tortillas (which probably have an interesting heritage, as they were a pale gold color and flecked with blue), and you have one hell of a taco. Helado de maiz ($9) -- Two types of ice cream here: one sweet corn, the other queso fresco. The former is playfully represented as baby ears of corn. Crumbled corn cookie and a dab of cinnamon-y, atole-influenced corn cream acted as garnish. Very fun and just right for those who pass on cloying or heavy final courses. I expect Xochi to be better a year from now, as any weak points get discarded and the best dishes are fine-tuned into perfection. Right now it’s excellent, and I would urge anyone traveling to the city to make time for a meal there. Houston is lucky to have Hugo Ortega, and his followers are lucky to have so many different ways to enjoy his cooking.
  8. Walked by this place on the way to what would prove to be an excellent lunch at Siroc. Anyone tried it yet? Initial Yelp reviews are outstanding. It's right across 14th st from Buredo, in the old Lighter Cafe space at the top of the Metro escalator. Great to have some good felafel within walking distance of my office.
  9. Chef Monnier comes from the late Arômes, and his latest venture brings his take on seasonal French bistro fare to the heart of Baltimore. I'm mostly a skeptic of Restaurant Week, but the dinner I had here last week was a tantalizing taste of what Chez Hugo offers. I started with a refreshing tomato gazpacho which was the right balance of sweet and tart, and paired nicely with a very good order of gougères. Next was a lamb murguez sausage, which was fantastic - tender, juicy, and spicy, with that unmistakable lamb flavor. This came on a bed of couscous with parsley, golden raisins, and a harissa yogurt sauce, unadventurous but a good complement to the sausage. Dessert was a poached peach on a sweet biscuit with vanilla ice cream which was just OK. Tastes of my companions dishes were mixed as well. The escargot appetizer and monkfish entree were very fresh, but a little too clean-tasting and could have used more aggressive seasoning. The steak frites and accompanying green peppercorn sauce were perfect, however. Overall, for a Restaurant Week meal I thought Chez Hugo did a good job of balancing a creative and affordable menu, and there were enough strong components that I'd like to come back to try them at their best.
  10. Badwolf DC has information about Casa Luca. http://www.casalucadc.com/ is the restaurant's website. http://www.opentable.com/casa-luca is Open Table's site for reservations. Fabio won the Rammy award this past weekend as D. C.'s Chef of the Year for Fiola.
  11. Anyone been yet? I know they are only open for lunch so far, but the initial buzz seems quite good. I was never in doubt of course, but I think this could be something really special. We have ressies for the middle of next month for dinner, so I will be sure to report back but just curious to see if anyone has been there yet. Also....thoughts on parking? Mirabelle
  12. I recently had a chance to visit Bottega Louie, a bright, cavernous space in The Brockman Building on South Grand that is both a gourmet market and restaurant. The large open floor and high ceilings plan gives the place a certain vibrancy, with an accompanying noise level that you might expect from such a large room. I took a seat at the 10 stool bar in the front closer to the market and quite enjoyed the Cioppino, which also cost $30. It was a full bowl of succulent seafood, that contained perhaps the most plump mussels I have ever been served. Truly satisfying.
  13. Ocean Prime. Looks like another expense account steak and seafood chain is opening up just blocks from the White House, at 14th and G in the old Ceiba space. "OCEAN PRIME is much more than just a steakhouse or a seafood restaurant. OCEAN PRIME is an extraordinary dining destination." "We deliver more than just in amazing food and drinks: We create remarkable experiences." "Stylish attire suggested." I'd yawn, but I can't work up the energy.
  14. I looked for a while but can't find a thread on this place, which seems inconceivable to me, so I'll assume the error is mine. I just want to put in a plug and say that if you're looking to get a drink downtown (specifically near my office) you can do a lot worse that the bar here. It feels old school Washington, and for the past couple of years they have a put in a really good bar program. It's not cheap, but they use good ingredients (and fresh ingredients) and they know what they're doing with their cocktails. You can typically get seats at the bar or one of the bar tables, which you can't always say about Old Ebbitt, you can have a conversation, and they won't do something ridiculous like shake your Manhattan (like Old Ebbitt). I thought it deserved mention.
  15. Jessica Sidman of Washington City Paper reports that Woodward Table and WTF (Woodward Takeout Food), is now open. Has anyone heard anything about the opening Chef de Cuisine?
  16. Stan's Restaurant is in the MacPherson Square area, and is a worthy addition to the Dining Guide. A friend and I both tucked into a club sandwich, which thanks to Mario Batali in Lucky Peach a few years ago, I usually order at my first time in a restaurant because, as he says, "the club sandwich is the most interesting, most telling dish about how hard the kitchen is trying." And so it would be at my first visit to Stan's.... The club sandwich here did not disappoint. The combination of ingredients hit the spot. Filled to the edges of the four triangles, the lettuce was fresh, the bacon was fried in-house, the tomato was fresh and maybe local, the architecture was sturdy, and the satisfaction quotient was high. I had the fries as the side, and almost to my surprise, they were crisp on the outside and soft and hot in the middle. This place is a bit of a dive and somewhat loud, but I can't think of too many reasons not to return when I'm in that neighborhood.
  17. A new year brings new openings. Hung Liu In Print "Hung Liu In Print invites viewers to explore the relationship between the artist’s multi-layered paintings and the palpable, physical qualities of her works on paper. To make her prints, Liu (b.1948) uses an array of printing and collage techniques, developing highly textured surfaces, veils of color, and screens of drip marks that transform the figures in each composition. Describing printmaking as “poetry,” she emphasizes the spontaneity of the layering process, which allows each image to build organically with each successive layer. Before immigrating to California in 1984, Liu grew up during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution in China, where she worked alongside fieldworkers and trained as a painter. Adapting figures from historical Chinese photographs, Liu reimagines antique depictions of laborers, refugees, and prostitutes. Her multifaceted oeuvre probes the human condition and confronts issues of culture, identity, and personal and national history. Best known as a painter, Liu ably translates the “weeping realism” that characterizes her canvases into the medium of prints. This focus exhibition highlights selected prints from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts as well as the artist’s related tapestry designs."
  18. Hoping for you as well, but I can't think of any reason why it would be. But this prompts a good question: what are your best bets in that little corridor for a pre-theater (or pre-event) bite? I don't go to National Theatre often, but I do end up at JW Marriott for receptions and Warner Theatre is right there too - what are one's options? Occidental? Central? I'll quibble with @The Hersch's suggestion. Not the "Jaleo, with spectacular food" part, but it's just too far for this purpose - strictly speaking that's a full mile roundtrip. Am I being too precious? Maybe. But consider given the occassion(s), I'd be wearing a suit or at least a jacket, my companion likely in heels and a dress. And the sticky weather months are already upon us. Assuming we'd want to park once (and NOT drive to the theater + cab two ways), 0.3 mi. is probably the maximum walking radius. Thoughts?
  19. So...based on this review it sound like Oval Room is deserving of its own thread. Anybody besides Waitman and Mrs. B been since Chef Secich took the helm?
  20. My uncle's wife and her friend were in town for a visit and wanted to meet up with @MichaelBDC and me for dinner. They requested sushi but our #1 place, Sushi Ogawa, was booked and not knowing their budget, we decided not to push our luck with Sushi Taro. I ended up booking Sushi Gakyu after reading Tim Carman's review in the Washington Post. I used to walk by there everyday when I worked in the area, almost willing it to open, so I was very excited to finally be able to check the place out. When I made our reservations, I indicated that the four of us would like to sit at the counter and order omakase. The day of, the restaurant called to confirm our reservation and asked if we would like the $100 omakase option or $150 omakase option. As one could guess, the higher price meant more and higher quality fish. I selected the $100 omakase option but mentioned that we may order more if we were still hungry. We arrived right at 7:30pm to a mostly empty restaurant and our dining partners already seated at the counter. We would be the only ones at the counter the entire evening though there were 3-4 other tables seated and we did overhear one of the servers mention something about a party upstairs (perhaps Sushi Gakyu was catering it). Within five minutes of sitting down, we realized we were in for a treat. One of our dining partners was speaking in Japanese to Chef Ota and she insisted on ordering a bottle of sake from the "featured sake" list rather than the regular one. We started off with a bottle of Kotsuzumi "bloom on the Path" Junmai Daiginjo. It was so smooth and clear. We started with a refreshing salad of tomato, cucumber, seaweed, and dashi jelly. We also ordered edamame. That was followed by fried salmon cheek which was very good. Sashimi of sea bass with ponzu came next. Then came a taste of fugu/puffer fish (though I forget what part of the fish we got). A second bottle of sake. Four different slices of salmon nigiri. Three different pieces of tuna nigiri. Nigiri of seared prawn, raw scallop, and raw prawn was next. Finally, eel and a sweetened omelet. That was supposed to be the end, but we added small bites of uni from Maine and California as well as a little marinated squid. It was all fantastic. My only quibble with the meal is that the rice seemed a bit dry or undercooked, but the variety of the fish really made up for that. Our dining companions picked up the bill so the real price of dinner is unknown. Sushi Gakyu is certainly another option for sushi lovers out there and I definitely see us going back for another round of omakase.
  21. Soupergirl is located on M between CT and...18th st NW, this little take-away place just opened a few weeks ago. Some of you may recognize Soupergirl b/c she's been selling at local farmers' markets for years. Her food is all virgin (my short-hand for local, organic, eco-friendly, ect). Plus she's vegan and kosher. In my eyes the vegan thing is a huge downside. I love meat. All kids of protein. I digress. The menu consists of maybe 6 fresh soups every day and they offer free tastes. She has Gazpacho (or did earlier this week). There's also pre-packaged salads of both the veggie and grain varieties. Some of her soups are served both warm and cold. I've had a wonderful soy veggie soup and a fabulous quinoa salad that I added shrimp to once I got home. Excellent. Didn't really need the shrimp but I thought: why not? Give it a try; I think you'll like it.
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